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Vol. LXXII, 



No. i. 



Th< 



Home Missionary 

July, 1899 





ALEXANDER HUNTINGTON CLAPP, D.D. 

New York 

Congregational Home Missionary Society 

Congregational Rooms, Fourth Ave. and 2 2d St. 

Entered at the Post-Office at New York, N. Y., as Second-Class [Mail] Matter 



Contents for July, 1899 



PAGE 

Alexander Huntington Clapp i 

Funeral Address by Dr. Jefferson. . . i 

"The Beloved Secretary," by Dr. 

J. B. Clark 2 

Address by Dr. Richard S. Storrs.. 6 

Prayer by Dr. S. H. Virgin 9 

Seventy-third Annual Meeting .... 13 

Annual Sermon, Dr. John H. Barrows 21 

Opening Address, General Howard. 25 

Annual Report 26 

Women's Meeting, Mrs. Caswell's 

Report 29 



Address of Mrs. L. S. Childs, 
Oklahoma 29 

Address by Mrs. F. E. Clark 31 

Continuing Needs of the West .... 32 

Dr. W. H. G. Temple's Address ... 35 

Field Secretary Puddefoot's Address 36 

Home Missions and the Nation's 
Larger Responsibilities, Dr. 
Lyman Abbott 37 

From Secretary Clark's Paper, 
" What Nexf " 42 



The Home Missionary 



Is published quarterly, at thirty cents a year, postage paid. It is sent without charge, on 
request, to be made annually, to Life Members ; Missionaries of the Society and its Aux- 
iliaries ; Ministers securing a yearly collection for it in their congregations ; also to individu- 
als, associations, or congregations, one copy for a year for every ten dollars collected and paid 
over to the Society or an Auxiliary. Suitable names should accompany the payment. 
Pastors are earnestly requested to serve Home Missions by promoting the use of this journal 
and "Congregational Work" at the Monthly Concert and among their people. 

Immediate notice of discontinuance or change of post-office address should be given. 



THE 



HOME MISSIONARY 



FOR THE YEAR ENDING 



&8RIL, 1900. 



Go, . . . Preach the Gospel. — Mark xvi. 15. 
How shall they Preach, except they be sent? — Rom. x. IS- 



VOL. LXXIL 



NEW YORK: 

CONGREGATIONAL HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY, 

FOURTH AVENUE AND TWENTY-SECOND STREET. 
1900. 



INDEX TO THE HOME MISSIONARY 



Volume LXXII 



JULY, 1899-APRIL, 1900 



PAGE 

Abbott, Rev. L., D.D., Address 37 

Abramson, Rev. A., Death of 27 

Acknowledgments 84 

A Country Ripe for Christian Work.... 93 
Addresses: Abbott, Rev. L., D.D., 37; 
Barton, Rev. J. L., D.D., 170; Bar- 
rows, Rev. W. M., D.D., 32; Boyn- 
ton, Rev. G. M., D.D., 156; Calkins, 
Rev. Dr. Wolcott, 97; Childs, Mrs. 
L. S., 29; Clark, Mrs. F. E., 31; 
Clark, Rev. J. B., D.D., 2, 42, 165; 
Coit, Rev. Joshua, 95; Day, Rev. C. 
O., 161; Howard, Gen. O. O., 25; 
Jefferson, Rev. C. E., D.D., 1; 
Puddefoot, Rev. W. G., 36; Storrs, 
Rev. R. S., D.D., 6; Temple, Rev. 
W. H. G., 35; Virgin, Rev. S. H., 
D.D. (Prayer), 9; Webb, Rev. E. 

B., D.D 173 

A Foreign Home Missionary Soc 96 

Allen, Rev. F. H 8a 

All for Each, Each for All 147 

Annual Meeting 214 

Annual Report of Special Committee 26 

Annual Sermon, Dr. J. H. Barrows.... 21 

A Plea for Missouri 115 

Appointments, 44-46, 119-121, 183-184, 237- 

243. 252 

Ashmun, Rev. E. H 81 

A Wonderful Story 147 

A Year of Surprises 24 

Babyless Churches 148 

Badger, Rev. Milton, His Spirit in Dr. 

Clapp 3 

Baker, Mr. E. H., Election of 81 

Barrows, Rev. Dr. J. H., Annual Ser- 
mon 21 

Barrows, Rev. Dr. W. M., Address 32 

Barrows, Rev. Dr. W. M., Memorial Ad- 
dress 211 

Battle Between ■ Christianized Judaism 

and Pagan Rome 37 

Beginning of Our Work on Lower Yu- 
kon 114 

Bible, An Up-to-date 235 

Brand, Rev. Dr. Jas., Tribute to 27 

Broken-hearted Pastors of To-day 169 

Brown, Rev. A. A., Resignation of . . . . 149 
Brown, Rev. C. T., Superintendency of. 82 
"Bullets for Spain: Bread for Cuba".. 155 

California Jubilee 147 

Caswell, Mrs. H. S., Annual Report.. 29, 145 

Changes in the Office and the Field 81 

"Children of the Antilles,," 85 

Childs, Mrs. L. S., Address 29 

Christian Endeavor Alaska Mission 8a 

"Christ or Anti-Christ" 34 



PAGE 

Clapp, Alex. Huntington, Obituary Note 1 
Clark, J. B., Address at Funeral of Dr. 

Clapp 2 

Clapp, Alex. Huntington, His Buoyant 
Soul, 2; His Birth and Education, 3; 
His Devotion and Ministry to Re- 
demption of America, 3; Survival of 
Spirit of Milton Badger, 3; His Influ- 
ence Among the Missionaries, 3; His 
Sympathy, 3, 8; Confidence Inspired 
by Him, 3; His Success as an Offi- 
cer, 4; His Connection with CongTst, 
4; " Blessed Are the Peacemakers," 
4; " Blessed Is He that Considereth 
the Poor," 5; "One Royal Gift " — 
Sense of Humor, 5, 8; A Seminary 
Friendship, 6; A Serious Christian, 
7} A Great Secretary of a Great So- 
ciety, 8; His Predecessors, 8; Thank 
God that We Have Known Him 
Here, 9; " He Has Been Perfected," 
10; "Thanksgiving for His Life," 10; 
"The Mantle of His Gracious Spirit," 
12; The Strong Influence of His Im- 
pressive Personality, 12; Tribute to, 
27; Acknowledgments of Tribute to, 

84 ; Souvenir of 213 

Clark, Mrs. F. E 31 

Clark, Rev. J. B., "What Next?" 43 

Coit, Sec'y Joshua, Address by 95 

Cole, Rev. H. H 83 

Comity? 146 

Committee of Fifteen 168 

Conditions of Utter Desolation 93 

Cong'l Ideas Are Growing 112 

Congregationalism Adapted to All Peo- 
ple and Souls 116 

Co-operation 212 

Cuba in New York and Brooklyn 89 

Cuban Mothers a Sad-eyed Race 87 

Cuban Possibilities 91 

Cuban Training Class, Havana 235 

Cuba, Hidden Treasures in 235 

Cuba Ready 93 

Cuba, Religiously 94 

Contributed Articles: Rev. A. J. Bailey, 
180; Rev. L. P. Broad, 107, 214; Rev. 
H. Bross, D.D., 109; Rev. C. F. Clapp, 
178; Rev. Richard Cordley, D.D., 221; 
Rev. E. D. Curtis, D.D., 112; Rev. 
A. De Barritt, 91; Rev. C. W. Fra- 
zer, 150; Rev. J. K. Harrison, 177; 
Rev. E. P. Herrick and Cuba, 85; 
Rev. E. P. Herrick, 235; Rev. J. M. 
Lopez-Guillen, 89; Rev. H. Porter, 93; 
Rev. G. J. Powell, 231; Rev. H. San- 
derson, 176; Rev. W. H. Thrall, 112; 
Rev. L. L. Wirt, 113; Rev. A. K. 
Wray, D.D «S 



Index 



in 



Days of Isms in Mass 103 

De Barritt, Rev. A., Article by 91 

De Peu, Rev. J., Election of 81 

Desire for Protestant Schools 92 

Dingley, Hon. Nelson, Tribute to 27 

Domestic Missionary Society 100 

Editorial Notes 81-85, i45-i5°> 209-214 

Every Dollar Is Provided for 113 

Every Missionary Secretary an Optimist. 165 

Exchanges 82 

Experiences as a Pioneer Missionary in 

Kansas 32 

Extension of Framework of Organized 

Society 161 

Fairmount College, Kansas 229 

Fargo College, North Dakota 233 

Fernandez, Dr. J. M 90 

Financial Distress of Last Seven Years.. 166 

Floating Society of Christian Endeavor. . 153 

Ford, Rev. J. T., Retirement of 81 

Foreign Work at Home 182 

From Under the Arctic Circle 113 

Function of the Magazine 84 

Funeral Services at Broadway Tabernacle 1 

Go or Suffer 151 

Gray, Rev. W. B. D., Appointment of.. 149 
Growing Strength of the Churches 83 

Harris, J. A., The First Convert 153 

Havana Congregationalism _2io 

Hay Tent, Lawrence, Kan "222 

He Has Given Us the Heathen for an 

Inheritance 42 

Herrick, Rev. E. P 149 

Herri ck, President Geo. M 228 

Hispano-American Church 89 

Historical Survey 97 

History of Revivals in Mass 104 

Home Missions and the Nation's Lar- 
ger Responsibilities 37 

Howard, Gen. O. O., Annual Address. 25, 155 
How Can You Interest the Children? 31 

Ibor City, Congregational Church 86 

Immanuel Mission .'. 87 

Increased Employment of Labor 108 

"Increase the Gifts 25 Per Cent" 160 

Ingersoll, Dr. Edw. P., Election of 8i 

January Convention .'.. 211 

Jefferson, Rev. C. E., Funeral Address.. 1 

Johnson, Rev.. A. K., Death of 27 

Junior Endeavor Societies 31 

Kansas Congregational Colleges 226 

Kansas Self-supporting 213 

Kansas Self-supporting, Article, Supt. L. 

P. Broad 214 

Kansas, Beginnings in, Rev. Richard 

Cordley, D.D 221 

Lamson, Rev. Dr. C. M., Death of 81 

Letter from St. Michael 82 

Lopez-Guillen, Rev. J. M., Article by 

89, 149 

Loyalty Tested 172 

Lum, Rev. S. Y 225 

McDaniel, Rev. S. C, Retirement of 82 

Maile, Rev. J. L., Transference 81 

Majority of American Votes 22 

Marti, Jose, His Last Visit to Key 

West 154 

Massachusetts Auxiliary 211 

Massachusetts Centennial _ 146 

Medieval and Asiatic Institutions 33 

Men Are Worth More Than Methods.. 118 
Men Wanted 176 



Merrill, Rev. Dr. G. R., Appointment of. 149 

Mills, Rev. B. C„ Death of 27 

Minutes of the 73d Annual Meeting 13 

Missionary Apportionments 42 

Moffatt, Miss M. D 145 

Moral and Spiritual Forces of Our 

Agency 103 

Morley, Rev. J. H., Resignation of 149 

Morrison, President N. J 230 

Natural Culmination and Fruitage 89 

National Expansion 38 

Nebraska Congregationalists 147 

Nebraska Plan 210 

New England the Mother of Genuine 

Americanism 22 

North Wisconsin 84 

No. s John Street 37 

Obedience Leads to Co-operation 172 

Officers of the Society 18 

Old Stone Church, Lawrence, Kan 223 

One Hundred Per Cent. Advance 209 

One Hundred Years Old 95 

Opportunity the Mark of the Situation. . 161 
Our Cuban Work in Florida and Cuba... 85 

Our Municipal Evils 23 

Our Spanish Neighbor 182 

Over-churching New Towns 146 

" Pearl of the Western Seas " 89 

Peculiar Fitness of Cong'l Order 163 

Pierce, Mr. and Mrs. A. R., Generosity 

of : 86 

Pioneer Settlements Still Exist 33 

Plenty of Money 98 

Plymouth Church, Lawrence, Kan 224 

" Polygamy Is Not Dead " 33 

Porter, Rev. H 93 

Powell, Rev. G. J., Appointment to Su- 

perintendency 82 

Prayer at Funeral of Dr. Clapp 9 

Precious Experiences with Missionary 

Boxes 30 

Prevailing Religious Indifference 181 

Problem of Immigration 106 

Puddefoot, Rev. W. G 145 

Puddefoot, Rev. W. G., Address 37 

Quantrell's Raid 224 

Quarter of a Million Dollars from Conn.. 43 
Question of Federation 158 

Railroads Are Good Thermometers 176 

Readiness to Be Aroused 163 

Read It Through 209 

Receipts 46-76, 121-139, 184-203, 237-271 

Reconstruction of Organized Home and 

Foreign Missions 166 

Relief Without Pauperizing 101 

Relief Work in Cuba 87 

Roll-call of Consecrated Millionaires 24 

Roll of Honor 84, 149, 213 

Roll of Members at Annual Meeting 15 

" Rule of Bigotry and Cruel Oppression " 87 

St. Bernard Relief Station 113 

St. Michael 113 

Selden, Strong, Mrs. C. M 91 

Self-support 83 

Shelton, Rev. C. W 14S 

Simmons, President H. C, Memorial 231 

Spiritual Forces in American History 21 

Steady and Substantial Advance 107 

Stepped Out of a Missionary Box 30 

Storrs, Rev. Dr. R. S., Address at Fu- 
neral A. H. C 6 

Taylor, Rev. L. L., Report of Special 

Committee 26 

"Teaching First, Then Preaching" 117 

Telegrams at Annual Meeting 20, 21 



IV 



Index 



PAGE 

Temple, Rev. W. H. G., Address 35 

The Apportionment 148 

The Band of Prayer 153 

" The Beloved Secretary " 2 

The Chief Fountain-head of Christian Pa- 
triotism 22 

The Continuing Needs of the West 32 

The Field Force 145 

The Forefinger of America 150 

The Home and the Church 97 

The Influence of Congregationalism 91 

The Long Lever of the Nation 43 

The Massachusetts Centennial 84, 95, 173 

The Missionary Situation 146, 156, 209 

The Motive : 170 

"The Only Congregational Minister" 33 

"The Power of Little Things" 25 

The Situation Stated 156 

The Supreme Need of H. M. S 42 

The Treasury 81, 145 

The Woman's Meeting 29 

"They Were All Evangelists" 104 

To Test Our Policy 102 

Two Orders of Progress 40 

Upton, Rev. A. G 82,149 



PAGE 

Virgin, Rev. Dr S. H., Prayer at Funeral 
of Dr. Clapp 9 

Warren, Rev. Jas. H., Charge to" 147 

Washburn College, Kansas 227 

Webb, Rev. Dr., Address 146 

We Must Train a Constituency 117 

Western Prosperity 83 

Western Prosperity and Home Missions: 
In Kansas, 107; in Nebraska, 109; in 
Indiana, in; in South Dakota, 112; 
in Colorado, 176; in North California, 
177; in Oregon, 178; in Washington... 180 
What Is the Matter with the Situation?.. 165 

What Next? 42 

What Will the Prevailing Institutions 

Be? 34 

Whitman, Marcus 17-5 

Wirt, Rev. L. L 113 

Wisconsin, Self-supporting 148 

Work in Massachusetts 96 

World-sacrifice for a World-salvation 173 

Wright, Rev. R. B., Appointment of 149 

Zeitgeist of Materialism... 106 



33477 



The Home Missionary 

Vol. LXXII JULY, 1899 No. 1 

ALEXANDER HUNTINGTON CLAPP 

Born in Worthington, Muss., September i, 1818. 
Died in New York City, April 27, 1899. 
, Aged eighty years, seven months. 

In the death of Dr. Clapp, a unique and beloved man is removed from the fellow- 
ship of our Congregational churches and from the service of Home Missions. For 
nearly thirty-five years he has been in the employ of the Home Missionary Society as 
Secretary, Treasurer, or Editorial Secretary. This prolonged service was almost con- 
tinuous, notwithstanding some physical disability, up to within six weeks of his death. 
To the last he was cheerful, hopeful, faithful, and his end was peace. His beloved com- 
panion of more than fifty years is the sole survivor of the family, but his friends, scat- 
tered over the land, and especially in the home missionary churches of the West, will 
read with tender interest the tributes to his memory that follow. 

FUNERAL SERVICES AT BROADWAY TABERNACLE 
OPENING ADDRESS 
By Rev. Dr. Jefferson 

|T is not fitting that I should speak at any length this afternoon. 
Who am I that I should speak ? — a child of a new generation, a 
stranger in the city of New York, which was for so many years his 
home ; a stranger to him throughout his long life, save in the last year only. 
But because I did know him this one year I feel I must, here before his 
casket, express my gratitude to Almighty God that I was permitted to know 
him even twelve short months. To have known him even through that 
brief period I count one of the rich, rare blessings of my life. His face 
was an evidence of the divinity of our religion. His spirit was a new proof 
that it is not necessary for a man in this world to grow old. His hearty 
hand-shake in yonder aisle at the close of the morning service, and his lu- 
minous smile, were always to me an inspiration, and the spirit of the prayer 
which he offered here on the evening of my installation, just one year ago, 
seems to me to linger in the atmosphere of this church like a fragrant 




2 The Home Missionary July, 1899 

breath from heaven. That prayer has followed me in all my work. How 
we shall miss him — how I shall miss him ! As the boy in the elevator 
said the other day, as he took me up to his room, " Everybody loves that 
man." I have no doubt that everyone who comes to know him yonder 
will love him, too. 

About four years ago, when it came time for him and his wife to cele- 
brate their golden wedding, he had printed on the cards of invitation 
these lines from Dean Stanley : 

" Till death us part." 

So speaks the heart, 
When each to each repeats the words that hold ; 

For better or for worse. 

Days palmy or adverse, 
We will be one till life's last hour is told. 

Right below these lines from the pen of the distinguished Englishman, 
Dr. Clapp wrote these lines : 

" Till death us join." 

O voice yet more divine ! 
That to the broken heart breathes hope sublime ; 

Through lonely hours, 

And shattered powers, 
We still are one, despite all change and time. 

Can we not say, who knew and loved him here, that we still are united 
with him, notwithstanding a cloud has received him from our sight ? 



"THE BELOVED SECRETARY" 

By Rev. Dr. J. B. Clark 

To those who have known Dr. Clapp only during the later years of 
his life, when every step he took was a torture, it will be impossible to 
conceive of one charm of manner which older friends can never forget — 
the light springing step that marked his every movement, and which 
seemed the perfect physical index of the buoyant soul that reigned within 
him. His entrance into any assembly of his brethren was an instant 
challenge to hopefulness and good cheer. Upon the platform and in the 
pulpit there was something brave and knightly in his very attitude which 
arrested attention, begot faith in the speaker and in his message, and quite 
as much as his words were eloquent, inspiring, and convincing. All this is 
so in contrast to the halting steps with which of late we have been pain- 
fully familiar, that to many of his earlier friends it has seemed that age 



July, 1899 The Home Missionary 3 

had taken an unfair advantage of one who remained young in every other 
way to the latest hour of his active life. 

Alexander Huntington Clapp was New England born and New Eng- 
land trained. Boston schools, two famous academies — Philips (Andover) 
and Leicester — Yale College, Yale Divinity School, and Andover Theolog- 
ical Seminary, contributed to his education. The Centre Church, Brattle- 
boro, Vt., and the Beneficent Church, Providence, R. L, were the scenes 
of his only pastorates, and during the latter he served as Chaplain of the 
Tenth Rhode Island Volunteers, stationed at Washington for the defense 
of the Capitol. 

But for thirty-five years, lacking a few months, his life has been 
devoted to one thought and purpose, the redemption of America through 
Home Missions. His early lessons in this school of work were taken at 
'the feet of Milton Badger, whom he reverenced and loved ; and if the 
spirit of Milton Badger survives to any extent in the office of the Home 
Missionary Society, it is an inheritance, transmitted through the example 
and frequent precepts of Dr. Clapp, his admirer and devoted pupil. 

Something of his blessed influence among the missionary churches 
and pastors of the West may be inferred from the title that early attached 
to his name, and that clings to it still. Among other men, his compeers 
and frequent companions in missionary journeys, he was distinctively 
known as " The Beloved Secretary." Everyone loved Dr. Clapp. His 
sympathy was perfect, and also it was genuine. Many touching letters 
are found in our missionary files from obscure Home Missionaries and their 
wives, blessing him for his visits to their prairie homes and for words and 
acts of cheer which had passed wholly from his own mind. Often of late 
years, white-haired veterans have appeared at our office door inquiring for 
the man who more than any other gave them hope in some dark season of 
missionary experience, and after hours of mutual reminiscence, hours that 
were always cheerfully spared by him for such interviews, they have left 
their trembling blessing, and gone their way with brimming eyes, and 
not often with empty hands, confirmed in their abiding affection for" The 
Beloved Secretary." 

More than most men, Dr. Clapp inspired and invited the confidence of 
his brethren. It would be difficult to compute the hours of his busy life 
when visitors without special claim upon his time have poured their per- 
sonal or family or professional troubles into his ear. Never by the 
faintest sign did he indicate weariness or preoccupation ; never after- 
wards was he heard to complain of such visits as intrusions. The matter 
was generally beyond his power to relieve, and of this his visitor was as 
well aware as himself. One thing, however, he had to bestow — the gift 
of sympathy, unfeigned, and this he was always ready to lavish, without 
weariness or stint. He took his own reward in the knowledge that 



4 The Home Missionary July, 1899 

trouble confided to a willing and sympathetic listener is robbed of half its 
burden. The other half, it is true, fell into his own heart ; but God had 
given him a buoyant spirit that could afford to bear his brother's burden, 
and so he felt that he fulfilled the law of Christ. 

His success as a missionary secretary, treasurer, and editor will be 
cherished in the office as an inspiring tradition. Whatever he attempted, 
like good Hezekiah, he did with his whole heart, and so he prospered. 
His visits to the giving churches of the East were welcome as spring. 
They were occasions to be anticipated with pleasure. Benevolence 
became a sort of luxury when inspired by the stirring and often witty 
appeals of the Beloved Secretary. Large bequests to Home Missions 
were sometimes traced to the magic touch of his hand. 

The Home Missionary Magazine for a long series of years bears wit- 
ness, in almost every number, to his literary taste and skill, and withal to 
a certain flavor inseparable from the man, and traceable in every stroke 
of his pen. "Huntington" is a pen-name as familiar to American Con- 
gregationalists as the organ of the denomination itself, and it was only 
when bodily infirmity forbade him to gather the news of the churches that 
his always fresh and piquant letters to the Congregationalist ceased. 
Were these letters gathered up and published in bound form, they would 
constitute a running history of church life in these two cities for a quar- 
ter of a century. And not of one church only, for his was a catholic 
spirit ; they would bristle with keen and pungent critiques upon the cur- 
rent history of the day ; they would do noble honor to many a hero, as 
he fell at his work ; and, above all, they would ring with the clarion note 
of righteousness in every social or public issue they touched. It is 
simply impossible to estimate the influence of such letters on public opin- 
ion, following as they did week after week, and read as they were by 
thousands of admiring friends in many sections of the land. They were, 
however, to him only the recreations of a busy life, the acanthus leaves 
on the column, whose solid shaft was his devotion, body and soul, to the 
work of evangelizing America. 

" Blessed are the peacemakers ! " This dear brother was born to 
be an arbiter between opposing factions and interests. His early and 
most successful pastorates owed much to this judicial cast of mind. In 
nothing but a question of conscience could he be persuaded to take sides, 
but for the right as against the wrong he was firm as adamant. This 
quality transferred to the administration of the Society made him an 
invaluable adviser. Many the time, when discussions over policies and 
expedients have waxed hot, his well-timed silence has been a salutary 
example ; or his deliberate opinion, moderately expressed and mingled 
with that sweet oil of humor which was always in store, has lubricated the 
jarring wheels and smoothed the road to some middle course that proved 



July, 1899 The Home Missionary 5 

in the end to be a wise one. His official correspondence was eminently 
marked by the same irenic spirit. None knew better than he how to deal 
with the captious critic, the dissatisfied giver or the grieved friend, and 
probably no other officer of the Home Missionary Society, in the seventy- 
three years of its long history, has disarmed more enemies, silenced more 
complaints, and attached more friends than this man of gentleness and 
peace. 

" Blessed " also " is he that considereth the poor." It would astonish 
us all, it would have astonished our brother himself, could the sum of his 
private benevolence be ascertained. Until quite recent years pensioners 
upon his bounty were among his daily visitors. Alas ! they were not 
always worthy. But it took vastly more evidence than his brother 
officers required to convince him that stories of distress were sometimes 
highly colored and that often they were fictions and lies ; and when in 
rare moments of conviction he doubted the tale and refused the solicited 
help, then followed to this tender-hearted brother a half day of sadness, 
made up in part of the fear that he might be withholding help from the 
perishing and partly in pity for the impostor himself. But many were 
the channels through which his bounty found its way to God's worthy 
poor, and many the blessings that returned to rejoice his heart. 

One fiction of his method was to lend money to his distressed brethren, 
taking in return their note of hand. I have seen a full sheaf of such 
notes, which if collected would enrich a missionary secretary. They 
were never meant for collection. They were gifts disguised, and the 
disguise was as well understood by the receiver as by the lender. 

Such a record may not seem to commend our brother as a model 
business man. He was a business man : he came of a stock of business 
men, and in early life he received a business training. But he was more ; 
he was a man of tender and pitiful heart, who chose to be guilty of some 
error in his methods of charity rather than fail to hear from his Master's 
lips, " Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my 
brethren, ye have done it unto me." 

Dr. Clapp was endowed with one royal gift which, more than any 
other, brightened and prolonged his life. No man was ever more free 
from levity, none more intensely reverent ; no prayers like his so led us 
into the unseen Presence. Yet few men, I believe, were ever born more 
keenly sensitive to the humorous side of life. His sense of humor was 
carved on his features, it beamed and scintillated in his eyes. It rose at a 
touch and was as contagious as it was natural. And yet, to myself even, 
it seems a remarkable confession from one who has lived many years 
under its daily spell that never in all these years have I seen .the pos- 
sessor abuse his wonderful gift. Never have I seen it unkindly indulged. 
Never have I seen his overpowering love of fun employed to wound a 



6 The Home Missionary July, 1899 

friend or to wrong an enemy. It was the natural exuberance of a gentle, 
loving heart charged by the creating hand with a double measure of 
that merriment that doeth good like a medicine. And the good it hath 
done, the sinking hearts it has lifted, the tired brains it has refreshed, the 
dark hours it has illumined, the intricate problems it has irradiated, let 
those who stood nearest to our brother in the daily wear and tear of life 
testify with grateful hearts. How can we go back to the old tasks without 
him ? How shall we stand before that vacant desk and look never again 
into those wonderful eyes ? The smile that was our sunshine, the merry 
quip, the quaint story, the droll mimicry, and, above all, the true sympathy 
that would register itself so swiftly on that dear and sensitive face — are 
these all now and henceforth but the memory of a dream ? 

Among all his glorious gifts there was one he lacked and sadly missed. 
He was denied the power of song. His love of music was intense, but the 
gift of expression failed him. In his own musical disability he even 
thought it a marvelous feat of memory that any one could carry a dozen 
musical airs in his mind. Strange that a heart so rich in melodies could 
find no utterance in song ! 

But, thank God, the silent tongue is loosed now — the faulty ear is 
attuned at length — the pent-up melodies of his soul have burst every 
restraining bond ; and could we choose his epitaph, it should be the words 
of Bunyan describing the resting place of Christian in Palace Beautiful : 

" The Pilgrim they laid in a chamber whose windows opened towards 
the sun-rising. The name of the chamber was Peace — where he lay till 
break of day, and then he awoke and sang." 



ADDRESS BY THE REV. DR. RICHARD S. STORRS 

My dear Friends : This would be an excessively sad service to. me if I 
regarded it as marking the close of the delightful and affectionate friend- 
ship which has now been going forward for fifty-five years, since I first 
met our dear brother in the Theological rooms in the Andover Seminary, 
and came to know him well and love him much. But it is not to me the 
close of this long and beautiful friendship ; it marks merely the beginning 
of a parenthesis not long to be continued, in the friendship which began 
so long ago, and which is to be perfected in the world of light. There- 
fore, it is not with sadness so much as with gratitude and gladness in the 
recollection of the past, and a deeper gratitude and a keener gladness in 
the expectation of the future, that I am here, standing beside his coffin. 

As Dr. Clark has described him, in his later years, he has vividly 
recalled to me the peculiar traits and powers in our dear friend, as I 



July, 1899 The Home Missionary 7 

knew him in his youth ; and it has been impressive to me, as I have lis- 
tened, to see how his strong and charming individuality went on into his 
subsequent life, went on to the very end of that life, the same graces and 
the same forces which had appeared in him more than half a century ago 
surviving and advancing to the end. 

I knew him as a diligent and keen-sighted student of theology, who 
had been trained at the New Haven school, of which Dr. Taylor was then 
the honored guide and illustrious head, who had come to Andover to re- 
ceive the somewhat different training which there was given. Serious and 
thoughtful, industrious and earnest he always was in his mental opera- 
tion. He was a Christian disciple of the old sort ; who believed in the 
Bible as the Divine Book for the world, and who, resting upon the decla- 
rations of truth in the Bible, knew that he had there a sure foundation, so 
that his mind was at peace. He believed in regeneration by the Spirit of 
God; and in conversion, as that decisive and final act of the soul in which 
it turns from sin unto righteousness, from the world unto God, and gives 
itself in absolute faith to the guardianship and guidance of Christ, and to 
the doing of his work in the world. He believed in sin, present and reg- 
nant in himself and in others ; and, therefore, all doctrines of grace in the 
Divine Word were exalted and glorified before his thought. He believed, 
with his whole mind and heart, in the atoning death of Christ, and in the 
forgiveness of sin which comes through the acceptance by faith of the un- 
searchable redemption in the Lord; and he believed in the rewards and 
destinies of the future. 

A serious Christian he was, and at the same time always, and equally, 
a cheerful Christian ; for there is no true cheerfulness in life which is not 
founded upon and rooted in the profound doctrine of Christ, in the Divine 
Word. There is no true and victorious joy in life which does not take 
hold of the supernatural reality, which, if we cannot reason it out for our- 
selves, is made clear to us by that which God has been pleased to declare 
in his Divine Revelation. He was always cheerful, even buoyant often- 
times, in his spirit and in his speech. He was a man who had been trained 
at that time in business affairs, as perhaps no other of us had been ; who 
was, therefore, more expert, more capable in such matters, than any other, 
I think, of his classmates was. At the same he combined with all this 
business expertness, these serious views of truth and life, this abounding 
cheerfulness and hope ; and the same humor was manifest in him in his 
youth which Dr. Clark has referred to as manifest in him to the end. 

Fisher Ames once said of the wit of Hamilton, standing by his garden 
gate as he was speaking, "It was as sharp as yonder thistle-blade"; and 
added a moment after, as the wind touched the stalk, " and as delicate as its 
down." That described the wit and humor of our dear brother and friend 
as he appeared in his early life ; and so his were among the traits of char- 



8 The Home Missionary July, 1899 

acter which one always remembers. We sometimes forget those whom 
we knew in the ardor and fervor of our younger days, whose impression 
on us was more commonplace ; but those who are serious and cheerful at 
once, affectionate, energetic, humorous, and witty, we never forget. I 
shall remember him while I live here, and until I greet him, if God shall 
give me grace to do so, in the higher world. 

Tli is special combination of traits and forces led some of us even then 
to feel that he would make a great secretary of some great society, and that 
that might be his office in the world, as afterward it turned out to be. 
His experience in business affairs, his sound judgment, his profound ac- 
ceptance of the Divine Truth, his sense of the value and necessity of that 
truth to the moral and spiritual life of the country and the world, — all pre- 
pared him for the office to which he came. And how much that constant 
genial humor in him has added to his efficiency, as well as that beautiful 
sympathy which has been referred to, I am sure that none of us can fully 
know. I know that for years, when he has written me letters — as I have 
not often met with him personally, for a good many years — when he has 
written me letters, upon that peculiar blue paper which he used, which 
was almost a jest in itself, I have begun to laugh even before I have opened 
the envelope, knowing that there would be some delicious suggestion of 
fun in connection with whatever serious matter he had to say, a fun inter- 
woven and manifest in the writing ; and into how many homes of mission- 
aries in the West, and along the frontier, and in the New England States, 
such letters have gone, carrying perfume and cheer, inciting smiles and 
happy laughter, probably only the record of the last day can tell. 

They say, I believe, that the precious opal takes its peculiar lustre and 
lovely charm from the slight fissures and films which are in the mineral, 
not simply from the mineral itself. And so there is a sense of humor, 
with a deep native capacity for humor, which in themselves might be 
counted even defects perhaps, or weaknesses, which, entering into the 
solid substance and stuff of character, give them brilliance, with that rare 
opalescent lustre which belongs to some characters in the world, and 
which surely belonged to his. 

The honest, energetic, persuasive thought, the honest dominating con- 
fidence in truth, were his always ; and his fund of wit was as much a gift 
of God to him as the power of rhythm is to the poet, or the power to carve 
the delicate marbles to the sculptor. 

As I think of his life, I rejoice that he was able to associate the work 
of his maturity with that of a great institution, like that to which his years, 
so many of them, were given. I remember Dr. Badger, Dr. Hall, Dr. 
Coe, Dr. Noyes, who were early in the direction of the Home Missionary 
Society, every one of them with a peculiar tenderness, and with a rever- 
ence for all in them which was strong, beautiful, and effective. He has 



July, 1899 The Home Missionary 9 

been a worthy successor to everyone of those who were there before him. 
His life has gone vitally into the institution, which is now drawing to the 
end of the three-quarters of its century, and it will live there as long as 
the Gospel continues to be preached by the ministers and missionaries of 
that institution in all our land. 

But, after all, how much more beautiful it is to feel that the life itself 
continues, personally beautiful, sympathetic, humorous, consecrated, in the 
world to come! There may be some in Heaven whom we shall almost 
shrink at first from meeting, if we reach there ; men who were on earth 
of an austere and commanding spirit, men who were here of an immense 
faculty for work, but rather disregardful sometimes of others. How 
blessed to know that there will be those there who have been cheerful, 
rich in sympathy, tender in affection, while also wholly consecrated to the 
Divine Service ; whose peculiar spirit will only be perfected on high ; that 
there will be women there, with all their loveliness, with all their excep- 
tional power over our life, glad to welcome us ! 

An Indian convert said to a missionary among the Cherokees many 
years ago, when the missionary had lost his wife, and later a little child : 
"There is a great star," pointing to the heavens; "I call that Jonathan 
Edwards ; and there is another great star, and I call that Judson ; and 
another is David Brainerd ; but, my dear brother and father, there are 
lovely stars for such as Harriet Newell and Mrs. K., and there is a whole 
milky-way of little stars, and they are the children." We shall meet the 
little children there ; we shall meet all the beloved again ; we shall meet 
those beautiful spirits whom we loved so tenderly, and who always brought 
refreshment and inspiration when we met them here ; and we shall meet 
him there, glorified, transfigured, with his faith only consummated in 
vision, with his power only glorified for the wonderful service which as yet 
we know not of, but which God shall have for us in the beyond ; with the 
smile on his face, which was always sunshine, there more beautiful than 
ever ; and with the joy in his heart, which was always his in partial meas- 
ure, and which there shall be his in glorious fulfillment ! 

Thank God for the early life ! Thank God for the maturer life ! 
Thank God for the closing years ! Thank God that we have known him 
here, and that we are to meet him in the beauty and blessedness of the 
Immortality, whither he has gone a little before us ! 

PRAYER BY THE REV. DR. SAMUEL H. VIRGIN 

Almighty God, our heavenly Father, we remind ourselves of thy 
sacred presence with us at this time, and in the strength and joy of our 
triumphing faith, come to thee with our prayer and our thanksgiving. 



io The Home Missionary July, 1899 

Thou hast kindly taught us that " no affliction for the present seemeth to 
be joyous but grievous," but thou hast assured us that "the sufferings of 
this present time are not worthy to be compared with the glory that shall 
be revealed in us." We hear thy voice saying unto us, " O thou afflicted, 
tossed with tempest and not comforted, behold, I will lay thy stones with 
fair colors, and I will lay thy foundations with sapphires, and I will make 
thy windows of agates and thy gates of carbuncles and all thy borders of 
pleasant stones." Fulfill thy sacred promise in thine own time and in 
thine own way. 

And yet we do not come with tearful eyes and burdened hearts, sor- 
rowing as those who have no hope. We do not say of our beloved friend, 
"He is dead," but "He has been perfected," while we look not at the 
seen but at the unseen, not at the temporal but at the eternal. Absent 
from the body, we think of him as present with the Lord, and pay these 
tender tributes of affectionate regard. 

We thank thee, our heavenly Father, that we are at this hour in pos- 
session of that faith that leads us to believe that he whose vacated earthly 
temple we have brought here where he was wont to worship in the beauty 
of holiness from time to time, is in thy presence, in glory eternal. We 
thank thee that we have the consciousness that his battle is fought and his 
victory won. We thank thee that we have the assurance that thy promise 
to him has been fulfilled, that he is enjoying the answer to his prayers ; 
that his Lord has come for him and taken him to the house prepared for 
him and tenanted by beloved kindred and friends, to be his home through 
all eternity. We bow before thee, almighty Father, in thanksgiving for 
this faith, and pray that it may be dominant in all our spirits at this time. 
Deliver us from the darkness of unbelief and give us the light of the glo- 
rious Gospel. We thank thee for this beautiful day with all the sweet 
charm and tender comfort that it smiles into our hearts from the bursting 
buds in the fields and parks, and for the evidence that it brings to us of 
the sources of abundant life even here beneath the streets of the great 
city. We thank thee for its kindly help, and pray that it may brighten 
and strengthen our lives. But more than for that, we thank thee for 
the beautiful and inspiring words which have been read by thy servant 
this afternoon, upon which we rest our faith, upon which we build our 
hope. 

We bring thee our fervent thanksgiving for the life of thy servant pro- 
longed so many years and made to bring forth fruit in old age, with an 
experience better even than the teaching of thy word, because thou hast 
made his fourscore years to be labor and joy in thy service. We bring 
thee our reverent thanksgiving for the consecration of his youth, for the 
early call of his Lord and that loving response that led him to lay down 
all he was and all he could obtain and all he could become at the feet 



July, 1899 The Home Missionary 11 

of Christ. We rejoice in the acceptance of that consecration, in the 
helpful ministry of thy Spirit, in the fidelity of those early years of prepa- 
ration for the work of life, in the earnest, steadfast devotion to the work 
of the Lord and the teachings of the Holy Scriptures ; we rejoice before 
thee and give thanks for thy rich blessing upon his early ministry, for his 
faithful preaching of the gospel of salvation through a crucified Re- 
deemer, for the many that were led to the Lamb of God that taketh away 
the sin of the world, and for the abundant joy and comfort that the testi- 
mony of their words and lives furnished him to the end of his life. We 
thank thee for the strength of the faith of those that were taught by him 
reliance upon the word of God. 

We praise thee, Our heavenly Father, that thou didst call him to the 
work of caring for the needy and destitute portions of our great country, 
and for that equipment of mind and heart which made him so fruitful in 
this service. Thou didst give him the confidence and affection of the 
whole land. We render our thanksgiving for his fidelity in the various 
relations which he was called upon to sustain, for his judicious handling 
of the treasury, so that under the might of his prayer of faith the small 
treasure multiplied sometimes into enough to supply the needs of many, 
with baskets full of fragments left. 

We glorify thee, our Father, for the great love that was in his heart for 
the humble and obscure toilers, so that the influence of his life is pro- 
longed in the lives of multitudes to-day ; for that patience which thou 
didst develop in him with the weak and erring laborers in thy kingdom, 
so that he was able to take upon himself the burdens of many and carry 
them cheerfully for many years. We thank thee that like the Master he 
entered into the perplexities of those who came with their anxieties and 
cares to him and became a ceaseless blessing to them. We praise thee 
especially for the joy that rippled out of his life and flowed like a river into 
the wasted lives of others, making them fertile again, for the fulfilment 
of thy promise that made Christ in him a well of water springing up into 
everlasting life and pouring itself out in rivers of living water continually. 
O Lord, our God, we thank thee for that loyalty to thy word that 
marked his every counsel and his every utterance, and for the strength 
and beauty of that character that distills its beneficent richness upon us 
to-day. Goodness and mercy did follow him all the days of his life. 

Draw near to us, Almighty Father, and receive our grateful thanks for 
the fruition of his hope, the end of his faith in the redemption of his soul, 
and in his glorious exaltation to be a priest and king forever. Hear our 
prayer, not for him — for we are glad that we have no need to offer petition 
for him, since every want is gratified and thou hast taken him to the 
goodly land where to think of is to see and to desire is to possess — but 
hear our prayer for those that still tarry in the flesh : for thy daughter to 



12 The Home Missionary July. 1899 

whom thou hast given the strength of his affection and his loving loyalty 
these many years. How shall she live without thy sustaining grace, with- 
out thy tender and affectionate fellowship, without those whispers of 
heavenly secrets that came to the disciples from the lips of Jesus on earth ? 
Strengthen her in body, in soul, and in spirit. Multiply to her divine 
consolations. May the glory of heaven come to her before she crosses 
its threshold. Make her pathway brighten and brighten till it is lost in the 
heavenly highway. May her experience of spiritual fellowship be so rich 
that she shall seem to be within the borders of the kingdom even before 
the celestial reunions. 

And bless this church out of whose membership he has gone to the 
heavenly citizenship ; sanctify to pastor and people his long and faithful 
service here ; sanctify his multitudinous prayers ; sanctify the words that 
have been spoken that shall come to mind again and again ; sanctify the 
influences that have been exerted, and grant that young and old may walk 
with like humility, like cheerfulness, like trust, and like faithfulness until 
the shadows pass away. We rejoice to remember the unfailing affection 
and constant support that thy servant gave to the ministers of this church, 
and joy in the assurance of the heavenly greetings and fellowship, oft 
anticipated, and already enjoyed. 

Sanctify his completed toils to the great Society that shall long miss 
his counsel and his labor. May the mantle of his gracious spirit fall upon 
his beloved associates. May the Master come to take his place. May 
these secretaries and those who have been associated with him in service 
in every department look for the voice and face and presence of the divine 
Lord, and so by the very uplifting and exaltation of thy servant may they 
enjoy increased heavenly counsel and strength in their daily work for 
Christ. 

May not the strong influence of his impressive personality be lost 
from the many interests dear to him in the kingdom of Christ, nor be with- 
drawn from the careless, thoughtless throngs of the great city that has so 
long been his home and the subject of his daily petitions, but may it 
rather be crystallized in a multitude of loving friends, so that, though 
absent from us, he shall still live with us, inspiring to service, guiding to 
duty and sacrifice. 

Draw nearer to us, our Father, and strengthen our souls in the service 
of thy kingdom as thy chosen toilers are taken to their rest and reward, 
and make us realize that, as the days move on and we approach the time 
of our departure, it becomes us to walk more closely in fellowship with 
Christ, illustrate more clearly the true spirit of the kingdom, be braver for 
every conflict, stronger for every burden. Sustain and strengthen us all 
amid the shadows of earthly life ; help us to make it " Christ to live " that 
it may be "gain to die " — for Jesus ' sake. Amen. 



July, 1899 The Home Missionary 13 



MINUTES OF THE SEVENTY-THIRD ANNUAL MEET- 
ING OF THE CONGREGATIONAL HOME MISSION- 
ARY SOCIETY. 

The Congregational Home Missionary Society convened for its Sev- 
enty-third Annual Meeting in the First Congregational Church, Hartford, 
Connecticut, at 7:45 p.m., Tuesday, May 23, 1899, with the President, 
Oliver O. Howard, of Vermont, in the chair. 

The devotional services were led by the Rev. Franklin S. Fitch, 
of New York. The Rev. John H. Barrows, of Ohio, preached the 
annual sermon from John vi. 63 : " It is the spirit that quicke'neth." 

After singing, prayer by the President, and the benediction by the 
Rev. John H. Barrows, the body adjourned till 9 a.m., Wednesday. 

Wednesday Morning, May 24. — At nine o'clock the Rev. Justin E. 
Twitchell, of Connecticut, conducted devotional services. President 
Howard made his annual address upon " The Power of Little Things." 

*At 9:45 the Rev. Joseph B. Clark, of New York, Secretary, read a 
paper entitled " What Next ? " 

The Rev. William G. Puddefoot, of Massachusetts, was appointed 
Assistant Recording Secretary. 

At 10:30, after a brief devotional service, led by the Rev. Washing- 
ton Choate, of Connecticut, the time was given to the Seventeenth 
Annual Meeting of the Woman's Department, Mrs. Harriet S. Cas- 
well, of New York, Secretary, presiding. 

The Secretary read her annual report. Mrs. Lucas S. Childs, of 
Oklahoma, spoke of "Missionary Boxes." 

After singing by Miss Gladys M. Jones, of Oregon, Mrs. Francis 
E. Clark, of Massachusetts, made an address upon " How to Interest 
the Children in Home Missions." 

Mrs. R. P. Fairbanks, of Vermont, conducted a responsive exer- 
cise. 

A collection amounting to $400 was taken for the general treasury ; 
a quartette from Redfield College, South Dakota, sang ; and Mrs. Joseph 
Ward, of South Dakota, led in prayer. 

The Rev. Alfred K. Wray, of Missouri, spoke of the people of the 
Ozarks, and an address was made by President Howard. 

After singing by the choir, Miss Jones, and the Redfield College 
quartette, the benediction was pronounced by the Rev. George W. Ray, 
of Colorado, and at 12:30 a recess was taken till 2 p.m. 



14 The Home Missionary July, 1899 

Wednesday Afternoon. — At 2 p.m., the following committees were 
appointed : 

()// Local Arrangements : Rev. Charles M. Lamson, Rev. Henry II. Kei.sey, 
Rev. Alfred T. Perry, Rev. Thomas M. JIodgdon, Henry R. Hovey, George F. 
Hills, J. Coolidge Hills, David Calhoun, Henry T. Olmstead. 

On Nominations: Rev. Henry H. Kelsey, of Connecticut; Rev. Charles B. 
Rice, of Massachusetts; Rev. James H. Lyon, of Rhode Island; Rev. Franklin S. 
Fitch, of New York. 



The Congregational Church Building Society was represented in 
addresses as follows : Rev. Levi H. Cobb, of New York, Secretary ; Rev. 
Charles H. Richards, of Pennsylvania ; Rev. Russell T. Hall, of 
Connecticut. 

At 2:45, after singing, the subject " Massachusetts and One Hundred 
Years of Home Missions " was discussed in addresses by three Massachu- 
setts men : Rev. Joshua Coit, Secretary; Rev. Wolcott Calkins, and 
Rev. Edwin B. Webb. 

After singing, the Rev. Samuel V. S. Fisher, of Minnesota, spoke 
for the Scandinavian Department. The benediction was pronounced by 
the R.ev. Edwin B. Webb, of Massachusetts, and at 5 a recess was taken 
till 7:45 p.m. 

Wednesday Evening. — At 7:45, devotional services were conducted 
by the Rev. Henry C. Simmons, of North Dakota. "The Continuing 
Need of the West " was presented in addresses by the Rev. Walter M. 
Barrows, of Connecticut, and the Rev. William H. G. Temple, of 
Washington. 

After singing, " The Cry of Cuba " was voiced by the Rev. John D. 
Kingsbury, of Massachusetts, and the Rev. Jose M. Lopez-Guillen, of 
New York. 

President Howard led in prayer, the doxology was sung, the bene- 
diction was pronounced by the Rev. Jose M. Lopez-Guillen, and at 10 
the body adjourned till 9 a.m., Thursday. 

Thursday Morning. — At 9 the body spent a half hour in devotion, 
led by the Rev. George W. Ray, of Colorado. 

Vice-President Rev. Edwin B. Webb, of Massachusetts, was called 
to the chair. The minutes of Tuesday and Wednesday were approved. 

The Report of the Executive Committee was presented and accepted. 

It was voted that the reading of the Roll be omitted, and that the 
Assistant Recording Secretary be authorized to complete it. The Roll, 
when complete, was as follows : 



July, ii 



The Home Missionary 



15 



ROLL 

General Oliver O. Howard, President. 
Rev. E. B. Webb, Vice-President. 



EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 



Rev. John D. Kingsbury, 
Rev. Charles M. Lamson, 
John H. Perry, 
Joseph William Rice, 



Rev. Charles' H. Richards, 
Asa A. Spear, 
Geo. P. Stockwell, 
David A. Thompson, 



William Ives Washburn. 



James T. Brinckerhoff, 
Mrs. Harriet S. Caswell, 



FROM THE OFFICE 

Rev. Washington Choate, 
Rev. Joseph B. Clark, 
William B. Howland. 



DELEGATES FROM CHURCHES 



California 
Miss Laura N. Richards. 

Connecticut 

Rev. Sidney H. Barrett, 
Frederick C. Bidwell, 
Mrs. S. H. Blackman, 
Mrs. Horace Burr, 
Mrs. Mary R. Burrall, 
Mrs. Washington Choate, 
J. George Clark, 
George S. Crosby, 
Rev. Benjamin A. Dean, 
Rev. S. R. Dedriksen, 
Rev. F. E. Delzell, 
J. W. Dike, 
Rev. Edward O. Dyer, 
Mrs. B. K. Field, 
Lewis A. Hyde, 
Rev. Frank A. Johnson, 
Rev. J. B. Kettle, 
John W. Lansing, 
Geo. A. Lewis, 
Nelson B. Mead, 
Rev. Robert Pegrum, 
Mrs. J. C. Randall, 
L. D. Sanford, 
Rev. Wm. Slade, 



Rev. Sherrod Soule, 

Mrs. Lois Burnham Sprague, 

Mr. and Mrs. S. B. Sprague, 

Mrs. H. B. Stever, 

H. G. Talcott, 

Thos. W. Russell, 

S. Terry Wells, 

John Woodford. 

Idaho 
Rev. E. A. Paddock. 



Illinois 
Claire Louise Warren. 



Massachusetts 

Mrs. N. J. Baker, 

W. A. Bliss, 

Rev. Edward E. Bradley, 

Ethan Brooks, 

Mrs. Reuben Brooks, 

Mrs. C. M. Burnett, 

Rev. Wolcott Calkins, 

Mrs. W. S. Dana, 

Albert Emerson, 

Mrs. S. M. Fowler, 



Rev. E. W. Gaylord, 
Mrs. Emily A. Hanmer, 
P. H. Hodgman, 
Rev. David L. Kebbe, 
Rev. William Knight, 
Nellie E. Lard, 
Rev. E. A. Lathrop, 
Rev. H. C. McKnight, 
Mrs. Frank W. Merrick, 
Charles W. Munroe, 
Rev. E. J. Moon, 
Mrs. E. A. Nash, 
L. E. Parsons, 
Mrs. L. E. Parsons, 
Rev. Arthur B. Patten, 
L. H. Porter, 
Rev. Charles B. Rice, 
Miss A. W. Small, 
Rev. Albert D. Smith, 
Rev. David H. Strong, 
Mrs. Oilman Waite, 
Rev. Chas. A. White, 
H. Lyman Williston, 
C. A. Van Winkle, 
Miss Miriam L. Woodberry. 



Missouri 
Rev. A. K.-Wray. 



i6 



The Home Missionary 



July, 1899 



New Hampshire 
Laura E. Matthews. 

New Jersey 
Geo. B. D. Keene, 
Rev. James A. Chamberlin, 
Rev. Chas. A. S. Dwight. 



New York 
Rev. Geo. A. Beckwith, 
Harlan Page French. 

Ohio 
Rev. Livingston L. Taylor. 



/ 'ertnont 

Rev. and Mrs. Henry 

Lincoln Bailey, 
Lafayette F. Clark, 
Dr. (). G. Stickney, 
Mrs. (J. G. Stickney. 



Connecticut 

Mrs. H. M. Adams, 
Francis N. Allen, 
Rev. E. F. Atwood, 
Rev. Dr. W. W. Belden, 
Rev. JohnWinthrop I'.allan- 

tine, 
S. H. Barber, 
Rev. Walter M. Barrows, 
Seymour II. Black man, 
Geo. T. Bixby, 
Mrs. Mary P. Bixby, 
Rev. Frank S. Brewer, 
Rev. H. S. Brown, 
Geo. P. Burrall, 
David N. Camp, 
Miss Ellen R. Camp, 
Rev. and Mrs. Wm. Carr, 
Rev. Geo. L. Clark, 
Edward S. Coe, 
Mrs. O. Vincent Collin, 
Rev. Geo. II. Cummings, 
Rev. John De Peu, 
Mrs. Mary Dewey Barrows, 
Rev. J. D. Doolittle, 
Miss Mary D. Eastman, 
Miss Elizabeth R. Eastman, 
Miss M. J. Elmore, 
Rev. Wm. F. English, 
Rev. Eugene M. Frary, 
Rev. Joseph A. Freeman, 
Henrietta A. Frisbie, 
Rev. Austin Gardner, 
Mrs. Thomas Gilbert, 
Rev. D. W. Goodale, 
Miss Alice H. Goodwin, 
Henry D. Hale, 
Rev. Alexander Hall, 
Rev. Russell T. Hall, 



LIFE MEMBERS 

Rev. W. D. Hart, 

II. D. Ilawley, 

Jabez H. Hayden, 

Rev. Lewis \V. I licks, 

C. L. Hickox, 

Rev. and Mrs. L. II . Hig- 

gins, 
M iss Julia I lovey, 
Mrs. Wm. A. Howe, 
Rev. Joel S. Ives, 
Rev. Herbert K. Job, 
Mrs. F. A. Johnson, 
Mrs. Mary P. Johnson, 
Rev. D. E. Jones, 
Rev. Geo. W. Judson, 
Rev. Luther M. Reneston, 
Mary J. Ackley, 
Andrew Kingsbury, 
J. A. Kippen, 
II. B. Langdon, 
Saxton B. Little, 
Rev. N. G. Marshall, 
J. T. McKnight, 
Rev. Calvin B. McLean, 
C. M. Minin, 

.Mrs. Gertrude Hills Millard, 
Rev. William II. Moore, 
Rev. Roscoe Nelson, 
Rev. C. A. Northrop, 
Mrs. J. E. Northrop, 
Charles E. Nott, 
Howard C. Peck, 
Mrs. J. C. Panton, 
Rev. Alfred T. Perry, 
Rev. A. H. Tost, 
Rev. H. B. Roberts, 
Emily O. Sanford, 
Nellie C. Scott, 
Mrs. W. H. Scott, 
Benj. Sheldon, 



Rev. C. W. Shelton, 

Rev. Thos. Simms, 

Mrs. Eli C. Smith, 

Mrs. Clover S. Smith, 

Rev. Wesley W. Smith, 

Mrs. A. J. Spencer, 

Rev. Edward < >. Stone, 

Mary E. Stowe, 

Sarah E. Stowe, 

Mrs. E. C. Stratton, 

Mrs. Abigail Talcott Mer- 

ten, 
Mrs. I. A. Thompson, 
11. C. Thompson, 
Rev. J. Spencer Voorhees, 
Mrs. J. M. Wardwell, 
Henry A. Warner, 
Rev. Robert F. "Wheeler, 
Rev. C. II. Williams, 
Mi>s S. Marie Williams, 
Mrs. W. P. Williams, 
Rev. Henry C. Woodruff. 

Massachusetts 
Rev. Harry'-. Adams, 
Rev. Geo. Wakeman An- 
drews, 
Rev. Henry E. Barnes, 
Rev. John Barstow, 
Charles T. Bauer, 
Rev. Ezra II. Byington, 
Rev. Arthur J. Benedict, 
Mrs. W. L. Blackmer, 
E. A. Bond, 
Rev. Geo. M. Boynton, 
Rev. H. A. Bridgman, 
Rev. Joshua Coit, 
Rev. Sidney Crawford, 
Rev. W. W. Curtis, 
Benj. F. Dewing, 



July, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



17 



Rev. Joseph F. Gaylord, 
Rev. John F. Gleason, 
Mrs. J. F. Gleason, 
H. A. Goodman, 
Mrs. E. L. Graves, 
Frank C. Hoyt, 
Edward P. Kelly, 
Rev. Burke F. Leavitt, 
Mrs. Lena M. Leavitt, 
Rev. Robert A. MacFad- 

den, 
Herbert Miller, 
Mrs. A. J. Moon, 
E. F. Morris, 
Rev. Sidney K. Perkins, 
Rev. A. B. Peffers, 
Rev. Alford B. Penniman, 
Mrs. E. H. Phinney, 
James Porter, 
Rev. W. G. Puddefoot, 
Rev. Dwight M. Pratt, 
Rev. L. S. Rowland, 
Rev. Walter Rice, 
Geo. C. Richmond, 
Ezra Sawyer, 
Mrs. Ezra Sawyer, 
Mrs. J. H. Searls, 
Minnie D. Sharrocks, 
J. H. Shedd, 



Joseph M. Smith, 
Rev. C. M. Southgate, 
Rev. A. M. Spangler, 
Miss Josephine E. Strong, 
Rev. C. E. Sumner, 
Rev. Rufus M. Tafft, 
Edward W. Kingsley, 
Mrs. Minerva R. Tubbs, 
Rev. Charles F. Weeden, 
Mrs. Charles A. White, 
Rev. Lyman Whiting, 
Rev. H. P. Woodin, 
Rev. S. H. Woodrow. 

Nebraska 
Rev. Geo. E. Taylor. 

New Hampshire 

Rev. F. D. Ayer, 
Rev. T. Eaton Clapp, 
Miss Annie A. McFarland, 
Rev. James G. Robertson, 
Mary G. Thorne. 

New York 

Mrs. Lucy W. Allen, 
Rev. Howard Billman, 
Rev. Frank S. Fitch, 



Mrs. Wm. Kincaid, 
Rev. Owen R. Lovejoy, 
Mrs. Owen R. Lovejoy, 
Rev. John K. Moore. 

New Jersey 
Rev. James Gibson Johnson, 
Mrs. IT. M. Shelton. 

North Dakota 
Rev. II. C. Simmons. 

Pennsylvania 
Rev. T. W. Jones. 

Rhode Island 

Rev. John Hale Larry, 
Rev. James H. Lyon. 

South Dakota 

Rev. E. B. Tre Fethren, 

Mrs. Joseph Ward, 
Rev. H. K. Warren. 

Vermont 

S. B. Emerson, 

Mrs. Rebecca P. Fairbanks, 

Rev. H. R. Miles. 



It was voted that the thanks of the Society be given to the Rev. John 
H. Barrows, of Ohio, for his eloquent and suggestive sermon, and that 
a copy of it be requested for publication. 

It was voted that the minutes, the sermon, and the Report of the Exec- 
utive Committee be printed, and also other papers, addresses, and reports, 
at the discretion of the Executive Committee. 

The Treasurer, William B. Howland, of New Jersey, presented a 
summary of his report, which was accepted. 

The Committee on the Report of the Executive Committee made 
a report, which was accepted. 

The third and fourth clauses of Article V. of the Constitution were 
amended to read as follows : " That the Executive Committee shall be 
arranged in five divisions of three each, one division shall be elected by 
ballot by the Society each year, at the Annual Meeting, to serve for five 
years, and the members elected shall be ineligible for a reelection for one 
year after the close of their term." 

In accordance with the directions of the last Annual Meeting, provided 



1 8 The Home Missionary July, 1899 

the next Annual Meeting adopts the principle of rotation in office among 
the Executive Committee, the Executive Committee presented the follow- 
ing plan for carrying into effect the Constitution so amended : 

First : All the members of the Executive Committee resign. 

Second : The Society elects three members to serve for one year ; three for two years ; 
three for three years ; three for four years, and three for five years. 

Third: In order that there may be as little injury as possible to the continuous 
working- of the Society in making the change, the four shorter terms of the Committee 
should be filled from present members of the Executive Committee, and the longest term 
with new men. 

This plan was adopted, and the members of the Executive Committee 
tendered their resignations, which were accepted. 

The Committee on Nominations made report, which was accepted, 
and the persons nominated were chosen by ballot, as follows : 

PRESIDENT 
Oliver O. Howard, of Vermont. 

VICE-PRESIDENTS 

Joseph R. Hawley, of Connecticut, 
Rev. John K. McLean, of California, 
H. Clark Ford, of Ohio, 
YYyllis W. Bairii, of Illinois, 
Rev. Edwin P.. Webb, of Massachusetts, 
Harvey J. Hollister, of Michigan, 
Rev. Edward P. Goodwin, of Illinois, 
Cornelius D. Wood, of New Vork, 
Rev. Edward D. Eaton, of Wisconsin. 

RECORDING SECRETARY 
Rev. William H. Holman, of Connecticut. 



AUDITOR 
George S. Edgell,. of New York. 

EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE 
To serve until 1904 

Edwin H. Baker, of Connecticut, 
Rev. Howard S. Bliss, of New Jersey, 
Rev. John De Peu, of Connecticut. 



July, 1899 The Home Missionary 19 

.To serve until 1903 

Rev. Edward P. Ingersoll, of New York, 
Joseph W. Rice, of Rhode Island, 
George P. Stockwell, of New York. 

To serve until igo2 

Rev. Charles H. Richards, of Pennsylvania, 

George W. Hebard, of New York, 

Rev. John D. Kingsbury, of Massachusetts. 

To serve until 1901 

Rev. Charles M. Lamson, of Connecticut, 
John H. Perry, of Connecticut, 
William I. Washburn, of New York. 

To serve until igoo 

William H. Wanamaker, of Pennsylvania, 
John F. Anderson, Jr., of New York, 
Asa A. Spear, of New York. 

The following were appointed a committee on the Report of the 
Executive Committee for 1900 : 

Rev. Edward N. Packard, of New York, 
Nathaniel Shipman, of Connecticut, 
Rev. Frederick E. Emrich, of Massachusetts, 
-Rev. William H. G. Temple, of Washington, 
Rev. Stephen M. Newman, of Washington, D. C. 

On behalf of the Executive Committee, Joseph W. Rice, of Rhode 
Island, presented a memorial of the Rev. Alexander H. Clapp, which by 
rising vote was accepted and ordered to be placed on file. 

The story of- Cripple Creek was told by the Rev. George W. Ray, of 
Colorado, and a collection of $153 was made for his work. 

After prayer by the Rev. Justin E. Twitchell, of Connecticut, and 
the benediction by the Rev. Wolcott Calkins, of Massachusetts, at 
12:15 a recess was taken till 2 p.m. 

Thursday Afternoon. — At 2, after singing, the Sunday-School and 
Publishing Society were represented in addresses by the Rev. George M. 
Boynton, of Massachusetts, and Samuel B. Capen, of Massachusetts. 

At 2:45 the Vermont Domestic Missionary Society was represented in 
an address by the Rev. Charles H. Merrill, of Vermont, Secretary ; 
and the work in Florida was described by the Rev. Sullivan F. Gale, 
of Florida, Superintendent. 



20 The Home Missionary July, 1899 

After singing, the Congregational Education Society was represented 
in addresses by the Rev. Charles O. Day, of Massachusetts ; the Rev. 
Williston Walker, of Connecticut; and the Rev. Henry A. Stimson, 
of New York. 

At 4:30, the Rev. Alfred K. Wray, of Missouri, Superintendent, 
spoke of the work in that State. 

After singing, the Rev. Charles M. Lamson, of Connecticut, led in 
prayer, and pronounced the benediction ; and at 5 a recess was taken till 

7:45- 

Thursday Evening. — At 7:45 the following resolutions were unani- 
mously adopted : 

Resolved, That the thanks of the Congregational Home Missionary Society are hereby 
extended to. the churches and pastors of this city for their invitation and cordial reception, 
and especially to the First Church and its pastor, who have so generously opened their 
house of worship for the sessions of this AnnuaPMeeting. 

Also to those who have led in the service of song, and to the organist and choir for 
their aid in worship. 

Also to those ladies who so kindly assisted in the service of the Woman's Depart- 
ment. 

AKo to the Railroad Associations, both east and west, for their courtesy in conceding 
reduced rates to those attending this meeting. 

It was voted that the time and place of the next Annual Meeting be 
referred to the Executive Committee. 

It was voted that the reading of the Minutes be dispensed with, and 
that the Recording Secretary be authorized to complete the Minutes to 
the close of the meeting. ■ 

The following preamble and resolution were unanimously adopted : 

Whereas, The Society has learned with intense interest of the work initiated in 
Alaska, and was deeply moved by the exhaustive report of the Committee sent to investi- 
gate the religious condition of Cuba, by which report it appears that the people there are 
now ready for the preaching of the Gospel, therefore 

Resolved, That in view of providential developments North and South during the year, 
it appears to be the duty of the Congregational Home Missionary Society to preach the 
Gospel in Alaska and Cuba. And we commend the action of the Executive Committee in 
these directions. 

The following telegram was received, and President Howard was 
requested to make suitable response : 

Aberdeen, S. D., May 25, 1899. 
Congregational Home Missionary Society, 
Care Rev. Dr. J. B. Clark, Secretary, Hartford, Conn. 

General Association South Dakota sends greeting and love to the mother of our 
churches. May her purse be as large as her heart. 

D. R. Tomlin, Moderator. 
[4:50 P.M.J 



July, 1899 The Home Missionary 21 

Response. 

Rev. D. R. Tomlin, Moderator, South Dakota Association, Congregational 
Church, Aberdeen, S. D. 
Hearty thanks and greetings. The mother's love is unabated. 

O. O. Howard, 
President Congregational Home Missionary Society. 

Devotional services were conducted by the Rev. T, Eaton Clapp, of 
New Hampshire, and the Redfield College quartette sang. 

The Rev. William H. G. Temple, of Washington, presented the 
claims of Alaska ; the Rev. William G. Puduefoot, of Massachusetts, 
spoke of the " Needs of the Farther West " ; and the Rev. Lyman Abbott, 
of New York, described "Our New Responsibilities." 

President Howard led in prayer ; the hymn " Blest be the Tie that 
Binds " was sung ; the benediction was pronounced by the Rev. Charles 
M. Lamson, of Connecticut, and at 9:30 the meeting was dissolved. 

William H. Holman, 
W. G. Puddefoot, Recording Secretary. 

Assistant Recording Secretary. 



SPIRITUAL FORCES IN AMERICAN HISTORY 

EXTRACTS FROM THE SERMON OF DR. JOHN H. BARROWS, 
PRESIDENT OF OBERLIN COLLEGE 

[The sermon is published in full, and may be had by applying to the Society] 
Text : John vi. 63 — " It is the spirit that quickeneth." 

No deeper words were ever spoken by our Lord. They touch the 
roots of individual and social life. We may well consider them at this 
missionary anniversary, for they express the fundamental principles of all 
our effort. In the belief that it is the spirit only that giveth life, that the 
forces of Christian faith, hope, and love are essential to personal and 
national well-being, this home missionary organization has carried on its 
fruitful work for nearly three-quarters of a century, touching with divine 
vitality the ever-expanding dominion of the Republic. It is this truth that 
has burned in the souls of those who have followed our civilization in its 
majestic march to the Pacific. In the light of it we may well review the 
victories of the past, study the problems and perils of to-day, and peer 
into the future with a wise, unfaltering faith. From the beginning, 
American Christianity has given the supreme place to spiritual forces, in 



22 The Home Missionary July, 1899 

the conviction that man's foremost need is the renewal of his nature by 
the spirit of God. The largest force in our national life has been the 
Christian teaching and temper, which have led the churches to seek first 
of all the regeneration of the human soul and the upbuilding of noble 
character after the pattern of Christ. On the continent of Europe, the 
effort by Church and State is to govern and educate men from without. It 
is by submission, by discipline, by intellectual skill, by institutions that 
men are to be fitted to become servants of the State. The Puritan idea 
has always gone deeper. The Puritan purpose has ever been to reach 
and renew the soul. Captain Mahan prophesied victory f,or our armies on 
account of the superiority of American over Spanish manhood ;but back 
of this superiority are the great controlling ideas of American Christianity, 
and in this respect they are in harmony with the fundamental teachings 
of Jesus Christ. He came to found a kingdom of renewed souls. What 
Socrates and Cicero never saw, the great apostle to the Gentiles beheld in 
the cities of Greece and Italy : men regenerated, born into a new life. 

We rejoice that we are assembled in this church and in this city. In 
coming to Hartford the Home Missionary Society returns to a chief foun- 
tain-head of Christian patriotism, one of the main sources of that Amer- 
icanism which has been dominated by Christian faith. We do not forget 
what the splendid genius and powerful spirit of Bushnell wrought for our 
nobler life. We do not fail to remember the seminary, which has manned 
our missionary enterprises, nor the generous givers who have so con- 
stantly maintained them. It has often been said that one must go west of 
the Alleghanies to find America. I do not believe it. I have lived on 
both sides of the Appalachian Ridges, and I have found the true America, 
throbbing and vital, resolute and independent, east as well as west of 
their beautiful summits. I look upon New England as the mother of 
genuine Americanism, and as a chief builder of our nationality ; and no 
one understands either the past, the present, or the future of the American 
Republic who is not in sympathy with the ideas of which New England 
has been both the champion and the expression. It is impossible to 
account for the American nationality, either in its origin, its controlling 
ideas, its development, or its destiny, without recognizing its vital connec- 
tion with those biblical forces which colonized Massachusetts and Con- 
necticut. 

Thirty years hence the majority of American votes will be cast in 
cities. There is no civic virtue more demanded in American life to-day 
than a wise patriotism, especially that form of public spirit which has been 
called municipal patriotism. The latter was the original type of this 
noble virtue. The enthusiasm of the Jew was largely a zeal for his cap- 
ital city. From Babylonian exile he sent his faithful cry across the desert, 
"If I forget thee, O Jerusalem, may my right hand forget its cunning." 



July, 1899 . The Home Missionary 23 

It was a somewhat similar devotion, in the citizenship of Attica, which 
made Athens, during her brief supremacy, "the eye of Greece, mother of 
arts and eloquence." On the Tiber the Roman built a capital embodying 
certain ideals, and he called that city imperial and divine, and her proud- 
est poet sang of the ancient heroism of ^Eneas from which there sprung, 
at last, the walls of eternal Rome. 

We know that among the future possibilities of American life are a 
heathenism and wretchedness, concentrated in some American London, 
approaching the awful brutality and misery depicted by the general of the 
Salvation Army in " Darkest England," where the cry of distress, break- 
ing from those pestilential rookeries, is wrung from lips purple with 
alcohol and crimson with fever. It is the city which biblical inspiration 
makes the type of an inhuman, material civilization, that Babylon which 
is yet to be destroyed, whose merchants shall mourn as they stand afar 
off and see the smoke of its burning ; the city whose merchandise is gold 
and silver and precious stones and pearls and fine linen and scarlet and 
all manner of vessels of iron and brass and marble, and cinnamon and 
odors and ointments, frankincense, and wine and oil, and fine flour 
and wheat, and beasts and sheep and horses and chariots, and slaves and 
the souls of men. Is not many a civilized metropolis rapidly becoming a 
ruthless machine wherein are ground up the souls of men ? 

Voices far more influential than mine have been urging New York and 
Chicago, Philadelphia and St. Louis, Baltimore and San Francisco, to 
awake out of sleep. I believe that the fire of a divinely kindled patriot- 
ism is not dead, but it needs to be turned with destructive ardor against 
the chief political evils of the Republic. 

De Tocqueville perceived sixty years ago that the city, through politi- 
cal corruption, was to be a chief menace to our freedom, and we are living 
to-day amid the frightful realities which he predicted. Our municipal 
evils are rightly attributed, by Professor Bryce, to the strength of party 
loyalty in things where no political principle is involved. The trouble is 
that so many men's pockets control their politics ; they weakly imagine 
that they cannot afford to follow their consciences ; they are determined 
not to offend their patrons ; they prefer to sell their principles to get a 
larger sale for their goods. Therefore, an educational and moral campaign 
should be inaugurated. I have been delighted in the last few months to 
notice many indications of a purpose in some of our cities, small and great, 
to make them beautiful with gardens and parks, to cleanse their streets of 
foulness and to decorate them with monuments of art. The greatest art 
the world has ever known came from republican Athens, republican 
Holland, and the fair, free cities of Italy. Art has a gracious and beautiful 
ministry if it is pure and genuine. 

But there are some things which art cannot do, though art may give 



24 The Home Missionary July, 1899 

a grace and splendor and dignity to municipal life, as in the cities of Italy 
and the Netherlands ; though it may widen and brighten the field of human 
thought and serve the moralities, there are things of far deeper concern, 
which commend themselves to our consciences and our conduct. Say all 
that you please about the refining influences of culture, and about better 
laws and institutions ; the primary and fundamental requirement is better 
men, a more Christian character. Legislation and social panaceas, and 
all human contrivances, are vain unless the heart be renewed. 

But I thank God that America has been rich and is now rich with men, 
masters of material things, princes of commerce, leaders of finance, who 
have been rich toward God. No other nation has such a roll-call of faith- 
ful consecrated millionaires as America. This Society honors them, our 
colleges honor them, our periled cities honor them. No men of our nation 
bear heavier burdens or have done larger things. It would be invidious 
to name a few of them when hundreds deserve our gratitude and our 
praise. They stand between us and despair. They brighten our faith in 
the republic and in the kingdom of God. 

The perils already passed and the precious things already gained ought 
never to be forgotten when our eager minds are fastened on the new 
things which seem so desirable. There are but few blessings which the 
nation now covets which are worth mentioning, compared with the bless- 
ings already secured ; compared with the peace of our homes, the general 
safety from violence which in the name of law plunders a man's pocket, 
as in Turkey, or takes his life, as in Russia ; compared with the right to 
choose one's occupation, which more than one-half of our race do not yet 
possess ; compared with liberty of travel, of speech, of worship, of assem- 
bly ; compared with all those circumstances which in this country beckon 
us with friendly hands and cheer us with kindly voices, and do not crush 
down our aspiring manhood, as in so many lands. The rights and oppor- 
tunities possessed by us have been won by the tears and toils of sixty cen- 
turies, by the labors of men of whom the world was not worthy, prophets 
dying without the sight of the Canaan into which we have entered. 

The last year has been one of surprises. It is impossible to put our- 
selves back into the egg-shell of one year ago. No one foresaw what 
was to occur, not even the President. How wondrously God has educated 
us, as he educated the nation in the ideas of liberty during the agonizing 
Civil War ! Under the red torch of battle, dull minds discern what has 
been hidden from them before. America has come to a clearer perception 
of herself, her mission, her duty, her destiny. In a new and unexampled 
sense she has become a w T orld power. Other peoples, too, are beginning 
to understand us, and our position. Some of them did not comprehend 
our motives. England, however, did. Outside of Anglo-Saxon liberty, 
the region influenced by Puritan and biblical Christianity, there has been 



July, 1899 The Home Missionary 25 

a feeble comprehension of true Americanism, the real spirit of the Repub- 
lic. America was usually thought of merely as a fat, prosperous, con- 
ceited, lawless, uneducated mass of vulgar people. But our brief war 
struck this great bulk of ignorance and prejudice, and has shown that we 
are strong where we were thought to be weak. Our good fighters did 
more to open the eyes of Europe than our good scholars. It is a shame- 
ful fact, for it shows how primitive is the European mind. Now that we 
have come to a new standing and prestige in the world of action, what 
we signify in the world of thought and religion will make a deeper im- 
pression. The recent war has not been one of the great conflicts of his- 
tory, except in its results. It was the last struggle between the Middle 
Ages and the Declaration of Independence, between the Inquisition and 
the common school, between intolerance and tyranny and the compact in 
the Mayflower. And we find ourselves at the close of it alert, self-confi- 
dent, rejoicing in a reunited country, and yet sobered by a sense, not of 
new responsibilities, but of old responsibilities brought home to the con- 
science and heart. We should not be boastful, and we should not be 
doubtful. We have great tasks, but we have a great people, wise leaders, 
a high purpose, and an immeasurable power for good. It is not an occa- 
sion for despondency that the nation which represents liberty, humanity, 
the spiritual forces of the Gospel, the purpose to uplift the poor, and 
large measures of the mind of Jesus Christ, should have back of it the 
greatest material resources of any nation. But material resources cannot 
save us. The flesh profiteth nothing. It is the spirit that giveth life. 
It only can transform material agencies into messengers of light and 
redemption. 

* 

EXTRACTS FROM THE OPENING ADDRESS OF 
GENERAL HOWARD 

" The Power of Little Things." We cannot emphasize too much the 
necessity for divine help. In the individual, in the family, in society, and 
in the state we have abundant illustrations of immense results outflowing 
from small beginnings. The child becomes the man, the hero, and the 
statesman ; the family in a few generations spreads over a State ; social life, 
under varied influences, shows marvelous attainments ; and a State, from 
humble beginnings, fills half a continent. All this is familiar enough 
to every reasonable being ; yet methinks that the full meaning of our 
Lord's parable is not sufficiently realized by Christians to the extent that 
it may be. 

About two weeks since I attended a banquet in New York. General 



26 The Home Missionary July, 1899 

Sickles, who sat next to me, told me the following incident. He was com- 
mander of an army corps in the Civil War, and lost a leg at Gettysburg. 
After being wounded, he was carried on a stretcher to the cars and taken 
to Washington. Abraham Lincoln came to see him before he was taken 
from the stretcher, expressing gratitude for his splendid work at Gettys- 
burg, and sympathy for his misfortune. Sickles looked up in his face, 
and said, jocosely : " President Lincoln, I understand you are all packing 
up and ready to leave Washington." Mr. Lincoln answered : " Some 
people were, but I wasn't, i went away by myself and prayed. I said to 
God, 'You know, Lord, that I have done all that I can ; we have sent in all 
the troops that we can ; we have done everything we can think of for the 
country to prevent its being destroyed. Oh, give us victory ! I will serve 
thee to the best of my ability all my life if thou wilt grant us victory. '" 
Then came into his body, soul, and spirit a wonderful joy never experi- 
enced before. 

There are peculiar needs of our Society which can be helped by little 
things. In large cities there are vast masses of people without God and 
hope in the world. One great need is to place more men with hearts 
filled with the love of God in those parts of cities where churches 
have moved away — Chicago, Cincinnati, and New York, all have this 
great need. 

Sometimes all we have to do is to say, "Come with me ; come into the 
house of God." It is said when two shall agree God is with them and 
will grant their petition. It is because there are three present — two solidly 
agreeing, and the Holy Spirit, — so that the petition is already granted, for 
the Spirit goes on before. Let us Christians make an effort ; let us make 
a solid agreement. It will be blessed by the Spirit of God. If we live 
up to our opportunities, out of us shall flow rivers of grace of living water, 
reaching and outreaching the boundaries of the earth. 



SPECIAL COMMITTEE'S ANNUAL REPORT 

By Rev. L. L. Taylor, Cleveland, Ohio 

For many years it has been the custom of the Executive Committee 
to begin its report with some reference either to God's sparing mercy or 
to the faithful servants he has called away from among us to their rest 
and reward. This year the committee to whom this report has been 
referred must claim a sorrowful precedence for the mention of its own 
great loss. It may be questioned whether there was another minister who 
was in a position to read the report of the year's work of the Society and 



July, 1899 The Home Missionary 27 

its missionaries with a deeper personal interest than Dr. James Brand, of 
Oberlin. 

The report of the Executive Committee opens with a just tribute to 
the memory of the Hon. Nelson Dingley, Vice-President of the Society, in 
whose death not only the Society but the nation feels itself bereft ; a 
statesman and a churchman in the highest sense of the words ; a political 
economist who never ignored and never forgot that divine economy in 
which man is ever something more than the sum and abstraction of his 
covetous instinct. 

In the conclusion of the report affectionate words of grateful com- 
memoration are spoken of Dr. Alexander H. Clapp, who has been called 
away from the work he loved after thirty-four years of faithful service. 
From the field itself three faithful missionaries have been removed by 
death — the Rev. A. Abramson, of Connecticut ; the Rev. Alfred K. John- 
son, of California ; the Rev. B. C. Mills, of Louisiana. 

The summary of results is given under the usual categories, and 
brought into comparison with that of the year preceding. It has been a 
hard year for the secretaries, for the treasurer, for the official board. It has 
been a hard year for our superintendents and auxiliaries. It has been a hard 
year for our churches and their missionary pastors. The desire for prog- 
ress which can be tabulated, the longing for columns of figures which are 
headed the right way, cannot be gratified this year. The present report 
shows the smallest receipts in twelve years ; the smallest expenditures in 
eleven years ; the smallest number of missionaries in ten years ; the 
smallest number of congregations and missionary districts (except for last 
year) in sixteen years ; the smallest number of Sunday-school scholars in 
nine years ; the smallest average amount expended for a year's labor in 
eighteen years ; the smallest average expense for a missionary in eighteen 
years. With one exception these columns seem to be marching in the 
wrong direction. 

We have gained 117 congregations and missionary districts this year. 
But in 1897 we lost 1,019. ln 1898 we lost 333 of what were left. While 
these figures probably do not represent as great a loss, either of strength 
or opportunity, as might appear on the surface, it is bad enough. In the 
columns which register our economies it is by no means certain, as might 
seem to some, that we are moving in the right direction. Perhaps the 
most suggestive figures are those which show that our work is costing 
us less per unit a year of missionary service than it did sixteen years 
ago. 

The receipts of the Society have been omitted from these last compar- 
isons as being subject to great fluctuations by reason of the varying 
amount received from legacies. The statement that our receipts this year 
were $261,502 less than they were in 1896 is more startling than it ought 



28 The Home Missionary July, 1899 

to be. For the receipts for 1897, the largest in the history of the Society, 
$777,747, were clearly exceptional. But the figures for this year, in com- 
parison with the figures for 1895 —surely modest enough to be normal — 
show a loss of $111,453. 

One of the most distinct impressions made by the report is this : That 
the work of the Society in the field is becoming more and more thoroughly 
institutionalized. This great fact tends to reconcile us to some losses, and 
even to offset them. 

The returning tide of prosperity, belated as the report shows in many 
fields, but destined to reach them all, it would seem, this year should sweep 
away many debts, should fill many vacant pulpits, should reclaim many 
abandoned fields, should bear many churches on to self-support, should 
open new channels of benevolence, should swell the regular revenue of the 
Society, should invite the launching of enterprises which have been long 
waiting for it, should be accepted as a divine commission to sail out over 
the bar to the new home fields which have been so recently opened to us 
in the southern seas. 

Let us have expansion, but let us remember that we have the sinister 
fifth dimension of debt to deal with also — to deal with also, we did not say 
Jit st. The loudest call to pay our debts, to compact our organization, to 
do our work better, to keep pace with the development of our continent, 
comes to us to-day from the islands of Puerto Rico and Cuba. Our new 
opportunities should make us scorn our old hindrances, and inspire us to 
sweep them out of the way. 

In accordance with action taken by the Society at its last annual meet- 
ing, the Executive Committee in February, 1899, united with the American 
Missionary Association in a joint commission to visit the islands of Puerto 
Rico and Cuba. This Commission divided the work so that the represen- 
tatives of the American Missionary Association visited and investigated 
conditions in Puerto Rico, and the representatives of the Congregational 
Home Missionary Society visited and investigated the conditions of Cuba. 
The report of this Commission as to Cuba was laid before the Society and 
churches in the April number of The Home Missionary, and the commit- 
tee regards the situation as calling imperatively for immediate work in 
that island. As a matter of fact, the work of this Society has been already 
begun in Cuba. The labors of the Rev. E. P. Herrick among Cuban refu- 
gees at Tampa, and the work of Mr. Lopez in New York, made it inevit- 
able that it would begin as soon as the war ceased. This is the crowning 
glory of the report for the year, and it is the more safe to say this because 
it may be said with such perfect confidence that there is not a laborer in 
our vast field who would not rejoice to see the blessed work to which he 
is devoting his life established in the fair island which, whether it shall be 
ours to possess, is now ours to save for Christ and the Church. 



July, 1899 The Home Missionary 29 

THE WOMEN'S MEETING 
EXTRACTS FROM MRS. H. S. CASWELL S ANNUAL REPORT 

Seventeen years ago the woman's organizations contributed to the 
national societies about $5,000. The amount has gradually increased 
until in 1897 we reported $107,507, of which $58,000 came to the treasury 
of this Society. In 1898 we fell short $14,000 to the Home Missionary 
Society, and $3,000 to the combined national societies. It is with regret 
that I must report a falling off this year of $1,394.69 to the Home Mis- 
sionary Society, and $2,513.09 to the combined societies. Nevertheless, 
let us not be discouraged, but in the name of our God renew our zeal and 
press on during the coming year to larger giving and more earnest en- 
deavor. 

A significant fact concerning these figures is that the loss in receipts 
has been largely at the East, while the Western unions in several instances 
have made a most encouraging advance. Minnesota, Vermont, and 
Southern California have gained over $300, Minnesota nearly $400. The 
unions making a gain of over $ioo- are Washington, Connecticut, New 
Hampshire, Florida, and Missouri. Taking the unions as to location, the 
gain at the East has been Vermont, Connecticut, and New Hampshire ; 
in .the West, Minnesota, Southern California, Washington, Indiana, Ore- 
gon, Colorado, Nebraska, Black Hills, Idaho, Montana, and North Da- 
kota ; in the South, Florida, Missouri, Texas, and Louisiana. 

Please take note that each union in the West and South that has made 
a gain in receipts this year belongs to a Home Missionary State ! This 
means sacrifice. 

Our money represents us to Cod. We may attend church and the 
missionary meeting regularly, sing, psalms and read the Bible, give stir- 
ring exhortations, and offer long and gifted prayers ; but if we spend 
more money for ourselves than for our Lord, he knows that we have no 
vital interest in the things of his spiritual kingdom. Jesus said, " Seek 
ye first the kingdom of God." 



ADDRESS OF MRS. L. S. CHILDS, OKLAHOMA 

Those employed by the Home Missionary Society are generally persons 
of limited means, and the people among whom they labor are nearly all in 
the same condition. And unless the salary of pastors is supplemented 
they must go without many of the necessaries and comforts of life. This 



30 The Home Missionary July, 1899 

is where the " missionary box " comes in as a valuable aid in helping to 
spread the Gospel. 

There are many benefits to be derived from the missionary box. I 
have just stepped out of a missionary box, and you are not ashamed of me, 
are you ? 

We have had some precious experiences that have come to us with 
these gifts. I remember a box received from New York, packed with a 
variety of things for our comfort. We could readily see that those who 
had prepared it were deeply interested in our welfare. It is a jolly time, 
I assure you, when the missionary box is being unpacked. We have often 
wished the dear ones that prepared the treat could be unobserved watchers 
to hear the exclamations of delight, as this or that garment is tried on and 
pronounced a fit. And we have 'said so often, "It is just what we were 
needing," or " These are little extra things that one could get along with- 
out, but they are so pleasant to have." 

Another of our choice gifts is good books, and valuable works have 
found their way in our home by the way of the missionary box. 

We are always watching the needy deserving ones who will make use 
of the contents of the box to get out to church and Sabbath-school. I 
have most appreciated the privilege of replenishing the wardrobe of some 
poor Christian girl who found it difficult to dress herself so as to look like 
other girls. 

From our experience in giving in connection with our home and foreign 
missionary societies I am convinced that there comes a real joy into the 
hearts and lives of those who faithfully prepare our home missionary boxes, 
and their interest, awakened by hearing from the field, adds much to their 
zeal and encouragement to continue this line of labor in the Lord's vineyard. 

There was connected with the entrance of the box from New York to 
our home such a wonderful consciousness of the Holy Spirit's presence 
that I vividly remember it as if God himself came also, as if each article 
had been prepared and packed with much prayer. We learned afterward 
through a friend that the lady who was chiefly instrumental in preparing 
it was a woman full of faith and of the Holy Spirit, and that she had 
specially asked his blessing to descend upon us. I have been conscious 
of this same prayer for the divine presence in connection with other mis- 
sionary gifts. It makes them doubly precious. 

Dearly beloved, I have a growing impression that our God is seeking 
to have us hunger for the revealings of his power in us, and then through 
us to help others. " Blessed are they that do hunger and thirst, for they 
shall be filled." " He that believeth on me from his inner being shall flow 
rivers of living water." This spake He of the Spirit which they who 
believe on Him shall receive. May the Lord abundantly bless the toilers 
for us in our Eastern churches, rewarding them richly ! 



July, 1899 The Home Missionary 31 



FROM MRS. F. E. CLARK'S ADDRESS 

Put the children's missionary education on the same basis as their 
school education. Take it for granted that they are to know about home 
missions and to give to home missions as a matter of course, and take as 
much pains to have them taught missions as to have them taught arith- 
metic. If there are any superintendents of Junior Endeavor societies 
here, let me suggest to them that a large part of their mission is to interest 
their children in missions, home and foreign, as one of the things "Jesus 
would like to have them do." 

How can you interest them ? Let me suggest two or three things that 
might be done, and you will think of many variations of these plans. Be 
interested yourself. You cannot hope to interest the children unless you 
have a real interest yourself. Tell the children about home missions. 
You will find in any number of The Home Missionary magazine material 
for plenty of stories of heroism and self-sacrifice, and if you study to tell 
your story well you will have plenty of interested listeners. Make the 
children tell you about home missions. A^ery likely you will have to pre- 
pare the stories the children are to tell, and perhaps to rewrite them wholly, 
but it will be work that is worth while, and when the children have told it 
themselves they will remember it. 

Use pictures when you can. Pin a picture of a home missionary church 
on to a child, and let her make believe she is that little church, and let her 
tell, or you tell while, she stands there, how that church was built, and 
what it has seen, and what it wishes it could see. Pin a picture of a box 
on to another child, and let her tell the story of " The Adventures of a 
Missionary Box." Pin the picture of a home missionary on to a boy, and 
let him make believe he is that missionary, while he tells where he lives 
and something of what he has been doing this last year. Pin a picture of 
Mrs. Caswell on to one of the girls, and let her tell something about her 
travels, and the things she sees and the things she wishes she could do. 

These are just a few suggestions, meant simply as hints of things that 
might be done, and many improvements and variations of these plans will 
suggest themselves as soon as you begin to work on the subject. All this 
means a good deal of work and careful preparation ; but is there anything 
in this world that is worth while that does not require hard work, and is 
there anything that is better worth while than just this work ? 



The moral destiny of our nation and all our institutions and hopes, and the world's 
hopes, turn on the character of the West. If we gain the West, all is safe. If we lose 
the West, all is lost. — Dr. Lyman Beecher. 



32 The Home Missionary July, 1899 



THE CONTINUING NEEDS OF THE WEST 

FROM THE ADDRESS OF REV. IV M. BARROWS, D.D., OF GREEN- 
WICH, CT., FORMERLY ONE OF THE NATIONAL SECRETARIES 

In 1869 1 went to Kansas, and spent two years there in home mission- 
ary work. I went to a new part of the State — to a county the southern 
half of which had just been opened for settlement. It was part of the 
Sac and Fox Indian Reservation. The Indians were still there, though 
they were about to be removed to the Indian Territory. I went to a town 
that had no existence except on paper. It had just been staked out. 
The first house we built was a barn, and this we used for some time as a 
hotel, as a town hall, and as a meeting-house. During that first summer 
people came there in their prairie schooners from all directions. They 
selected their lands and then went to work to turn over the prairie sod, 
that it might rot in time for next year's crops. It is no easy task to turn 
over this sod, and thus disturb the prairie's thousand-centuried sleep. 
The roots of the grasses are matted together so closely that it requires more 
than one yoke of oxen or more than one span of horses to send the 
plow through it. When turned over it is good for nothing the first year, 
except to raise a few stalks of sod corn, and that has to be planted with 
an ax. After having chopped in their corn, the pioneers go to work to 
provide some shelter for the approaching winter. Lumber is high and 
money is scarce. Rude shanties or sod houses are all that many are able 
to provide for their families at first. Think of the number of things these 
new settlers have to do. The land must be broken up, houses and barns 
built, orchards planted, roads and bridges constructed, farm machinery 
purchased. Then remember that most of these settlers ran in debt for 
their farms. They made one payment down, and the rest has to be paid 
in five annual installments. Do the best they can, it is with great diffi- 
culty that they are able to raise enough to keep soul and body together, 
and make their annual payments on their lands. 

You can well imagine that there will be little or no surplus that can 
be devoted to securing religious or educational privileges. This is the 
time when people appreciate a little help. This is the time they must 
have it, if they are to be kept in Christian ways. Without the Church 
the children will run wild, and in a few years will become so hardened 
that it will be next to impossible to reach them. 

It has always been a very important part of the work of the Society to 
follow these pioneers with the institutions of the Gospel. It has been 
freely admitted that recovery of settlement and rapid growth make con- 
ditions that have peculiar claim upon Christian people. But it may be 
said that there are not as many of these pioneer settlements as there were 



July, 1899 The Home Missionary 33 

fifty years ago. This is true ; yet they still exist in large numbers. All 
through the West there are open spaces that are filling up, and new towns 
that are coming into existence — 1,000 new post-offices every year ! There 
are whole counties that are destitute of religious privileges. This is true of 
the Old West ; it is still more true of the New West, or Rocky Mountain 
district, which comprises Montana, Wyoming, New Mexico, Arizona, 
Utah, Nevada, and Idaho. Here much of our home missionary work is 
conducted under abnormal conditions. The pioneers of their generation 
find that they are not pioneers. They find the soil already preempted by 
the Mexicans and the Mormons, and that both are under the control of 
tyrannical hierarchies. They find mediaeval and Asiatic institutions in- 
trenched in the very heart of the Republic. 

In 1873 I was sent by this Society to Utah to organize our Church and 
school work in that Territory — now unfortunately no longer a Territory. 
During most of the nearly eight years that I continued in this field I was 
the only Congregational minister in a region larger than the thirteen col- 
onies which constituted the first thirteen States of our Union. To-day 
there are forty Congregational churches in that great intramural basin, 
but only twelve of these are self-supporting. It is slow work establishing 
Christian institutions there, largely because we were not the first on the 
ground. But the importance of a work is often measured by the difficul- 
ties attending it. It is so in the case before us. Instead of withdrawing 
our missionaries from those slowly developing fields, we should continue 
them there, and send many recruits to them. Let us remember that 
polygamy is not dead. Having entrenched itself behind the rights of 
statehood, it is becoming more defiant than ever. Mormonism is a Sty- 
gian swamp that must be drained before that region can become a fruit- 
ful field. 

Beyond, the New West is the Far West, comprising California, Oregon, 
Washington, and Alaska, with their coast line on the Pacific of more than 
6,000 miles looking out toward our newest possessions, the Hawaiian and 
Philippine Islands, which constitute our Farthest West. These are bring- 
ing us into closer relations with that Asia, the Christianization of which 
must be the great work of the Church in the twentieth century. 

Dr. Temple, who is to follow me, will doubtless speak of this region, 
from which he comes ; a region a large part of which was saved to the 
Union by the foresight and energy and self-sacrifice of a few Christian 
missionaries, and it can be saved to the kingdom of Christ only by a simi- 
lar agency. 

It has been generally recognized that immigration and new settle- 
ment give opportunities for the Gospel like those which childhood offers in 
the household. The West, though its youthful stature is greater than the 
mature growth of most of the Old World powers, is still in its childhood, 



34 The Home Missionary July, 1899 

and for this very reason presents conditions and offers opportunities for 
Christian work, the most attractive in the world. Thucydides, in describ- 
ing a town founded jointly by the Ionians and Dorians, states that the 
prevailing institutions were Ionian. He thought it important to mention 
this fact. In view of the character of our population, made up as it is of 
people drawn from all parts of the world, it may well be asked, What will 
the prevailing institutions be ? 

Before this great world-movement toward our shores began, the States 
of New England and the other States on the Atlantic seaboard, with a 
homogeneous population, had had a steady and healthful development for 
200 years. You were thus prepared for the inundation when it came, and 
were not swept from the foundation upon which your fathers had planted 
you. 

But in most parts of the West there had been no such preparation. In 
that region there has been a sudden commingling of these diverse races. 
Which will prevail ? Which is to give character to the compound, Celt or 
Teuton, Slav or Anglo-Saxon ? Or from the mixture of the allied vari- 
eties of the Aryan race is there to come a finer type of man than has 
hitherto existed, as Herbert Spencer predicts ? 

Another Englishman has pointed out the fact that besides our work in 
developing the material resources of the country, we have a more difficult 
task, viz. : " To separate obstinacy from English courage, superstition 
from French thrift, indolence from Irish shrewdness, want of enterprise 
from Scandinavian industry, shiftlessness from negro docility, and indiffer- 
ence from Chinese skill and patience." 

But these are not the only problems that confront us. These different 
races bring with them different forms of religion and irreligion. Which is 
to prevail, Christ or Anti-Christ ? If it be the Christian religion, what 
type of this religion ? That represented by the Pilgrims and Puritans of 
New England and the Reformed Churches of New York and the Hugue- 
nots and Cavaliers of the South ; or that introduced at about the same 
time into New Mexico and Arizona and California by the Jesuits and 
other religious orders from Spain and old Mexico ; or that introduced 
into Utah and surrounding States by Brigham Young, the Yankee Mo- 
hammed ? Here are some of our problems, and upon their correct -solu- 
tion will depend not only the well-being but the very being of our Repub- 
lic. And while these problems face us everywhere, they possess aggra- 
vated features in many parts of the West. 

The editor of an Eastern paper has said recently " that the heart, his- 
tory, and future of this Republic depend on questions which are going to 
be settled by the great West." He affirms that " the center of power will 
remain where the center of purpose and population is — in the West." He 



July, 1899 The Home Missionary 35 

also makes some sensible observations on the need the East and West 
have of one another. The East, conservative and precise, needs Western 
push and enterprise. The West, on the other hand, needs help in plant- 
ing those institutions which will give strength and stability to its rapid 
growth. 

Daniel Webster was right when he said, " Whoever would do his duty 
and his whole duty . . . must look upon the whole country as it is, 
in its whole length and breadth. He must comprehend it in its vast ex- 
tent, its novel character, its sudden development, its amazing progress, 
confounding all calculations and almost overwhelming the imagination." 

Let us not then lose sight of the continental scope of our home mis- 
sionary work. 

When we call to mind the new States that our country is gathering 
"as children round her knees," States that need to be established on 
Christian foundations ; when we remember the communities still in an 
embryonic condition, where society is unorganized and the people scat- 
tered ; when we call to mind the great open spaces that are yet to be 
populated ; when we consider what must be done to prevent the foreign 
elements from lowering permanently the tone of our national life ; when 
we consider what must yet be done in order to conserve what has been 
accomplished and to bring to a successful issue the work already under 
way — when these things are borne in mind, who can affirm that the needs 
of the West are not as great and urgent now as they ever were ? 



DR. TEMPLE'S ADDRESS 

The Rev. W. H. G. Temple, of Seattle, Wash., followed with a further 
statement of the needs of the West. He said he brought with him a whiff 
of the great inlet of the Pacific Ocean, Puget Sound, and from Mount 
Ranier and all the intervening country, a welcome from the sons and 
daughters of the East who are building up the great districts of agricul- 
tural wealth, and from the Alaskan Mission a godspeed to the Society. 
The man who goes West and comes back East has to be very careful 
about his veracity, because the Eastern mind has not an adequate compre- 
hension of truth from the West. 

Dr. Temple said he was a Britisher by birth, and he missed the Union 
Jack on the eightieth anniversary of Queen Victoria's birth. At this the 
audience broke into the heartiest applause of the sessions. The speaker 
then described the effect the Klondike excitement had had upon the financial 
prospects of Washington, giving a graphic account of Libbey's. " Claim 



36 The Home Missionary July, 1899 

16," which had given to its owner a quarter of a million dollars, and had 
begun the Klondike rush. The people still need help from the East, 
and the sacrifices of the missionaries are so great that they must be 
relieved. The thousands of immigrants are coming into the State, and 
they must be met with the Gospel of Christ. In closing he said : "The 
West needs the money and the prayers of the East. If you cannot give 
money, give your prayers ; but if you can give and won't give, you may 
keep your prayers. We will try and struggle along without them." 



MR. PUDDEFOOT'S ADDRESS 

The unprecedented growth of population and the rapid settlement of 
land has led many people to believe that not only has the land been taken, 
but that missionary work is accomplished too. This is not surprising in 
view of the fact that a State which was the feeding ground of the bison 
forty years ago, and where the first settlers had to go one hundred miles to 
the mill, and corn selling at five cents a bushel, should now produce from 
the land alone stock and cereals enough in seven years to pay the whole 
debt of the United States. Such stupendous facts as these lead one to 
think there cannot be much laud to be possessed. The Dakotas for a 
short time were settled at the rate of a thousand miles a day from north 
to south, and three miles westward — or, in other words, as fast as the rail- 
way was laid. As we go westward we find large cities, academies, colleges, 
and universities ; and when we reach the Pacific we find the metropolis 
alive with humanity — crowds everywhere. Surely the work is done, cries 
someone. My friend, there is much land to be possessed. Had the 
churches realized their opportunity there would be much less to do 
to-day, but there are great gaps in the work of the Church as there are 
great gaps in the settlement of the land. A writer in Chambers' Journa 
over fifty years ago stated that if the land in Great Britain was farmed as 
scientifically as Holland it would support a hundred million people. Japan 
to-day supports over thirty millions on land that would not make a fourth 
of Texas. In view of such facts, what will be the population in the near 
future of this land, with millions of acres as yet untouched or taken from 
the Government? Even old States like Georgia and Alabama have pri- 
meval forests and unclaimed land. Is there no need of the Gospel in 
Georgia ? Some think she needs* the law. But we do not need to go 
South to find plenty to do. Our army and navy have made short work of 
Spain, and the Church realizes that there is much work laid out for her to 
do in Cuba, Porto Rico, and the Philippines, but she forgets that we have 
Spain at our back door. Are the great Territories of New Mexico and 



July, 1899 The Home Missionary 37 

Arizona not worth saving ? Has the Church done anything but play with 
Utah ? 

There are in Arizona to-day fifteen American towns, ranging from 
forty people to 200, without a church of any kind ; while scores of Mexi- 
can towns are without preaching, but are supplied with a mediseval religion 
that keeps them poor and ignorant. If the work in the new fields is to be 
of the same type as what we have in the Spanish fields at home, we need 
not worry about the millennium, but go to work. 

Mr. Whitney, in his book, No. 5 fo/m Street, tells of his going to live 
in the slums for six weeks, but gave out to the world that he had gone to 
shoot ducks on the Caspian Sea. It did not surprise them at all to hear 
that a man had gone across Europe and part of Asia to shoot ducks, but 
they would have been shocked to know that he' had taken lodgings at No. 
5 John Street, and was going to live on half a crown a day. And so it is 
with the Church work. It seems the proper thing to do to gird on our 
armor and start for all outdoors, and no one seems surprised ; but to send 
500 men into the worst parts of our own land would stagger us, and yet 
we have to call on the Government troops to help keep order where men 
are blowing up property with tons of dynamite, because the State troops 
are opening another door for the gospel in the Philippines. # There is 
indeed need of more work in the West ; and as long as the press teems 
with notices of lynchings, homicides,, and incipient rebellion there will be 
work for the Church. We have grown so fast that, barring Russia, we are 
to-day the greatest piece of unfinished civilization on the earth. 



HOME MISSIONS AND THE NATION'S LARGER 
RESPONSIBILITIES 

ADDRESS OF REV. LYMAN ABBOTT, D.D., NEW YORK 

He opened with a masterly review of conditions which have led up 
from the fundamental idea of Judaism that government was for the bene- 
fit of the governed, and not for the benefit of the governor. He then 
said : 

During the last year we have been engaged in one battle of this long 
campaign. The battle was not between Sampson and Cervera, it was not 
between Dewey and the Spanish admiral in Manila waters, it was not 
between Spain and the United States ; it was between Christianized Juda- 
ism and pagan Rome ; it was between the conception that governments 
exist for the governor, and the conception that government exists for the 
benefit of the governed ; it was between the nation which has embodied 



38 The Home Missionary July, 1899 

in its national life, on the whole with reasonable consistency, the doctrine 
that the nation is for the people, and he that would be greatest must be 
servant of all ; and the notion that governments exist for rings, machines, 
and bosses, and he that would be greatest must be emperor and master of 
all. It was not between the guns, but between the men behind the guns ; 
it was not between the men behind the guns, it was between the Inquisi- 
tion behind one gun and the public schools and the free Church behind 
the other. 

The free schools and the free Church have won victory. At the begin- 
ning of this century, or near the close of the last, you might have drawn 
a line right through this continent, north and south, and one-half of it 
would have been Spanish, and the other half of it American ; one-half of 
it under pagan Rome, the other half of it under free England ; the one- 
half of it given over to the Inquisition, and the other half of it dedicated 
to the free school and the free Church. 

We have been steadily expanding. Now it looks as though all the 
expansion up to date was simple and unobjected to by anybody. But all 
has been expansion. There was that same opposition to the purchase of 
Louisiana because it was expansion. There was the same opposition in 
regard to Texas. The same prophecy as to taking in Oregon and Cali- 
fornia, because it would be expansion. We are all expansionists so far as 
the expansion of the past is concerned. We only differ on the question 
whether the highway we have trod thus far we shall continue to tread in 
the future. The Inquisition was conquered, and the public school and the 
free Church have taken its place in Cuba and in the Philippines. It is 
because the Christian Church so interprets the events of the past that its 
attitude is what, with very rare exceptions, that attitude has been. The 
Christian ministry, which stood almost to a man opposed to the war be- 
tween England and America, has been with almost equal unanimity a 
supporter tacitly or openly of the present development of the nation. 
Why? Because there was sufficient spirit of prophecy in the pulpit of 
America to see in one case it was dividing the forces of Christianity, and 
in the other case to see that it was a providential overturning of forces of 
lingering paganism. I don't know how far here in Hartford you may 
agree with this interpretation of current history, but it is on this interpre- 
tation my own conception of the duties of the Church is based ; and I 
must, in all frankness, have given it to you, if I was to interpret those 
duties to you as I saw them. 

If it be true that this battle was one battle of the long campaign ; if it 
be true that the sinking of Cervera's fleet in Santiago Harbor was but the 
natural and logical following of the sinking of the Spanish Armada ; if it 
be true that the battle in Cuba and Manila was a battle for human rights 
and human liberty, and, more than that, a battle for God and for human 



July, 1899 The Home Missionary 39 

liberty, because the cause of God, then the duty laid on the Christian 
Church is clear and plain. What the speaker who has just preceded me 
has said is certainly and unquestionably true. War never constructs : it 
only destroys. All that the gun and the sword can do is to clear a field 
where the sower may follow. I am told that had I come here a few weeks 
ago I should have seen on my right-hand side here a building not exactly 
dedicated to the worship of God ; and now I see it is being torn down 
(applause). All that the present process can do for it is to level it to the 
ground. Then, either a highway for travel or a new structure conse- 
crated to better purposes must be put up by constructive process. All 
that the sword of Roosevelt, or that the guns of Shafter, or that the fleets 
of Dewey and Sampson can do is to level an old obstruction to the ground. 
Others must come in and build on the level place which the gun and the 
sword have prepared (applause). Already this process has begun. For 
the foundation' of this process is law. It is not infrequently the case that 
men sneer at law and lawyers. Perhaps it is because I am a lawyer as 
well as a minister, but more, I think, because I have two brothers who 
honor that profession, that I count the law in every sense of the term a 
natural and a necessary precedent to the Gospel. Law is the foundation 
on which the school-house and the church must be built. And law is 
something which the people of Cuba and the Philippines have never known. 
For that is not law which puts its hand upon a man, arrests him, shuts him 
up in a dungeon, leaves him without knowledge of what accusation has 
been brought against him, leaves him in absolute ignorance until the ac- 
cusers and witnesses have died, and all the people that know about it 
have died, and when at last, ten or twelve years afterward, he is liberated 
by the sword of America, neither he nor anybody else knows why he was 
arrested ! That is not law. That is Spanish — what do you call it ? We 
have begun this process of laying in Cuba, in Puerto Rico, and presently we 
shall begin the process of laying in the Philippines, the broad foundations 
of the law. A year ago, or less than that, George Kennan writes that 
he found the death rate in Santiago 700 a week. Now it is less than 50 a 
week. By law, enforced by General Wood ! I wish we had him here 
a little while as Governor of New York. By law, enforced by General 
Wood, those 650 lives each week were saved. 

I should really like to ask some man who thinks we are violating the prin- 
ciples of the Declaration of Independence by our course in Cuba, what his 
answer would be to this question. I read in the Declaration of Independ- 
ence this : " Every man has a right to life." Which right takes precedence ? 
The right of the 650 men, women, and children that were being slaughtered 
by the author of all evil sanitary conditions, or the right of the Cubans to 
so govern the city that they should not die ? First law, and then on law 
the whole fabric of the Christian civilization. It is not only that sanitary 



40 The Home Missionary July, 1899 

conditions have changed, but industrial also. I read as I came up to- 
night another letter of George Kennan's, and I read a sentence : "In 
July, 1898, a little less than a year ago, I doubt whether there was a single 
cultivated plant, grain, or root left growing within ten miles of Santiago 
in any direction ; and the great city market had almost nothing in the 
shape of food, but a few wild fruits. Now the country all about is dotted 
with little gardens and truck farms, and the central market is as well sup- 
plied as the central market in Washington." As I left the office this morn- 
ing I received a letter from the Far West, which said that the Christian 
ministry in general, and Lyman Abbott in particular, did not know what 
mercy and humanity mean. If that charge shall be brought against me 
and my brethren in the Christian ministry in the day of judgment, I will 
dare to stand before Almighty God and summon there as witnesses those 
now living who would have been slain before their time by the filthy con- 
ditions of Santiago, those now living who were becoming slain by the 
famined conditions which Spain had produced, and I would ask them to 
bear testimony whether Lyman Abbott and the Christian ministry knew 
what humanity and mercy mean, or not. 

He also tells us that a year ago there was not one single building in 
Santiago occupied for school purposes which had been constructed for 
school purposes ; and to-day over 1,700 boys and girls gather in the 
public school — in less than one year's time, under the beneficent flag 
of the American Republic ! 

I think if we Christians are going to keep pace in constructive philan- 
thropy with the military arm of the United States Government ; if the 
Christians are going to do as much to Christianize Cuba as the sword did, 
we have got to hurry up. And we are not to wait. We are not to wait. 
There are two orders in which progress may be carried on. One, I will 
call it, for convenience' sake, without any meaning of obloquy, socialistic ; 
and the other I will call Christian. One says, " Material conditions first. 
Clean streets. Plenty to eat. Education second. The public school. 
Then when the body is taken care of, and the education is taken care of, 
then the Christian Church." The other says, "The spiritual first, the in- 
tellectual second, and the material last, because if the spiritual is cared 
for, if the instruction is put within the heart, out of it will grow the 
schools and the clean streets and ample food ; whereas the ample food 
and public school without the Church will rot and decay ; despotism will 
come back again to grind human bodies up, and despotism will come back 
again to take possession of the school and blind the eyes of the pupils 
there." And so in all history it has been the Church which began. It was 
first the Christian Church founded by such Christian evangelists as Paul, 
going to men that were far more ignorant and degraded than the Cubans, 
and saying to them, "Ye are the sons of God." It was that man first. 



July, 1899 The Home Missionary 41 

And then when the church was built, the schools surrounded the church. 
Then came the Benedictine Friars, pushing out their agricultural improve- 
ments and reforms. It has always been so. What are the foundations of 
England? Who laid them? Augustine, the first missionary from Chris- 
tian Rome ; Alfred the Great, reading in the old Pentateuch constitutions 
of the people and incorporating them in the germs of English constitu- 
tion ; Wickliffe and Tyndall, opening the Bible that all the people might 
read it everywhere ; Cromwell, praying and fighting, trusting in God and 
keeping his powder dry. These were the men that laid the foundation in 
England ; these men, religious men, praying men, godly men, laying it 
on the foundation of that Book of Books, and that Life of Lives which is 
above all books, Christ Jesus. Who laid the foundation in this country ? 
The Puritans — bringing their religion with them across the sea to New 
England ; the Dutch, bringing their Gospel with them across the sea 
to New York ; the Roman Catholics, bringing their faith with them to 
Maryland ; the Huguenots, bringing their faith with them to North and 
South Carolina. The foundations of this country and England were laid 
in the Gospel of Christ. And to-day, if there is to be a work of construc- 
tion where the work of destruction has been done, it must be done in this 
order : the Church first, the school following the Church, industry follow- 
ing the school, yet all going along contemporaneously and together. 

I do not mean to-night to speak in any sectarian or denominational 
spirit. When I was pastor of Plymouth Church I was Congregationalist ; 
but now that I am editor of The Outlook, I am nothing but a Christian. 
Nevertheless, it does seem to me that in some peculiar sense the present 
responsibilities lay special obligation upon the children of the Puritans. 
If you were to go into the various churches of Hartford on the coming 
Sunday, and were to ask yourselves what are the distinguishing fea- 
tures of these churches, and were to try and get an impartial, judicial, 
honest, and colorless answer, I think it would be something like this : In 
the Episcopal church, a beautiful ritual ; in the Presbyterian church, a 
solid, well-built system of theology ; in the Congregational churches, 
Baptist and pedo-Baptist, liberty. And what is it above all things else 
the people that have been under the yoke of Spain need in Cuba but the 
message of liberty interpreted in the words of Christ ! If I were to go 
there, the texts I would choose to preach on would be such as these : 
" Every man shall give an account of himself unto God ; " " One is your 
Master, even Christ, and all ye are brethren ; " " The son of Man came not 
to be ministered unto, but to minister ; " "he that would be greatest among 
you, let him be servant of all." Now I wish I were. I look with envy on 
the young men that are just beginning to climb the hill. I wish I were 
going to Cuba, that I could learn that language, and then go to these 
people with the key of Hope, and the book of Hope, and the Christ of 



42 The Home Missionary July, 1899 

Hope, and the God of Hope, and tell them the story of him who came 
to serve and came to lift up ; go to them and tell them this : You are not 
to worship under the inspiration of fear, but under the impulse of love ; you 
are to bow down not to might, but to righteousness — and love is righteous- 
ness ; you are to see in every man a brother man, and in Christ the one 
man of all men, the Elder Brother ; you are to find in him the story of his 
sacrifice, the ministry of his life, the teaching from his lips, what will save 
you, not merely or cheaply from purgatory hereafter, but from very hell 
on earth, in which for the last three centuries you have been living. For 
the Christian Church is the foundation of Christian liberty, and we who 
have the Christian Church and on whom God has thrown the responsibility 
that comes from the emancipation of two widely separated peoples, have by 
that very fact laid on us the duty of carrying to them the foundations of a 
new life. He will give, the Good Book says — he will give us the heathen 
for an inheritance. He has. What do we think of the will ? How do we 
like it ? Will we take possession of the property ? 



FROM SECRETARY CLARK'S PAPER, "WHAT NEXT" 

Next to the continued blessing of God, the supreme need of the 
Home Missionary Society at this moment is an increased revenue for its 
work. Up to a recent period the available resources of the Society were 
increasing by an annual increment of about $2o,oco. With that noble 
margin we were enabled to seize upon opportunities as they multiplied 
with the natural development of the field. In a single day, almost, that 
stream was checked by a widespread industrial panic. Not only did this 
annual increment available for new work disappear, but the means of sus- 
taining the old work were dangerously crippled, and for several years the 
chief problem of the committee has been, not how to occupy new and im- 
portant points, but how not to sacrifice valuable and promising work, 
together with the money already invested therein. Missionary apportion- 
ments have been cut down from year to year to correspond with the 
shrinkage of receipts, until superintendents, State committees, and Mis- 
sionary churches are in a condition of despair. We have often discussed 
on our missionary platform how long a Home Missionary Society can 
stand still in its work, and the invariable answer has been that to stand 
still is to retrograde ; but a vastly more serious question faces us to- 
day — How long can a Home Missionary Society afford to retreat at a 
time when every need it was created to supply, and every opportunity 
providentially set before it, are steadily advancing ? 

A large and rapid increase of the resources of our treasury is the only 



July, 1899 The Home Missionary 43 

practical answer to such a question. Again, let it be recalled that the 
sources of this increase are just two, and no more — the beneficiary and 
the auxiliary States. Ought the Missionary churches to give more? 
Then they will. The appeal will be strongly made and persistently en- 
forced, and it will be our own fault if they do not respond. Should the 
auxiliary States in this crisis come unitedly to our relief? All honor to 
those Eastern auxiliaries that are always sharing so generously with us 
their Home Missionary revenues ! and we have learned by a happy ex- 
perience that the simple statement of a national need is the only appeal 
they ever require. But have they not some claim upon the older auxil- 
iaries of the West to join them more liberally in the support of the Home 
Missionary mother ? May not Connecticut modestly remind Ohio, Illi- 
nois, Iowa, and Wisconsin that during twenty-five years, between 1798 
and 1826, the churches of that State raised a quarter of a million of dol- 
lars for Home Missions, and, not reserving a dollar of it for Connecticut, 
sent it all into the new settlements of the West ! Think how much this 
money would have done for Connecticut in schools and churches, yet not 
a miserly Pharisee among them was ever heard to inquire, "Wherefore 
this waste ? " and no one seems to have thought of quoting that conven- 
ient text, or pretext, for selfishness, " He that careth not for his own is 
worse than an infidel." New York and Ohio, and all the new States of 
the West, were their own. This was their noble conception of Home 
Missions ; and under that same ideal, which still survives in New Eng- 
land, the West has been made what it is. 

None of us forget how great are the problems yet to be solved in these 
Western auxiliaries, and the money comes slowly for their solution. One 
reason of scant resources may be a too narrow appeal. Dr. Leonard 
Bacon once reminded a convocation of Connecticut churches that without 
the national appeal for Home Missions, Connecticut itself could not raise 
money enough in any year for its own missionary needs. Brethren of the 
West, broaden your appeal ! Add to your own claims the claims of Ore- 
gon and Colorado, of Oklahoma and the Dakotas ! The State lever is 
too short to lift your load. Put under it the long lever of the nation. 
God will honor such a spirit, your own missionary treasury shall be full, 
and the National Society shall be made glad with the overflow. 

From this time on we look for increasing receipts ; and while the Com- 
mittee hold back the work with conservative hand, Christian men and 
woman all over the land will add a measure to their ordinary gift for 
Home Missions until, before this natural sinking fund, debt shall dissolve 
and disappear. This is the next thing ; and after this, when the old 
ship floats once more in deep water and on even keel, we will shake out 
the sails, and with God's blessing turn her head towards new voyages and 
fresh victories. 



44 



The Home Missionary 



July, 1899 



APPOINTMENTS 



MARCH, 1899 



Not in commission last year 

Anderson, Oscar I. , Grant, Neb. 

Bacon. Easton S., Ogalalla, Neb. 

Barrie, N. C, No. Dak. and N. W Minn. 

Brooks, Edward L.. Detroit City. Minn. 

Dyas, John P., Buffalo. Wyo. 

Hanser, George P., Denison, Texas, 

Huestis, Chas. H., Doniphan, West Hamilton and 

South Platte, Nub. 
Jones, Idrys, Bruce and Apollonia, Wis. 
Longren, C. W., Montrose, Colo. 
McPhail, John William, Spring Creek and West 

Spring Creek, Penn. 
Tebbets, Arthur H.. Dawson, Minn. 
Willis, J. Vincent, Hannibal. Mo. 
Marsh, Wilson J.. Guthrie. Okla. 
Richards, John A., Altoona, Village Creek and 

Scatter Creek. Kan. 
Ruge, L. H., El Reno, okla. 
Smythe, Charles M., Verndale, Minn. 

Re-commissioned 
Adams, James R., Sheridan, Wyo. 



Avery. Holly H., Steelburg, Neb. 
Battey, George J„ Hemingford. Neb. 
Blomquist, (.has. F., Fosston and Longley, 

Minn. 
Connehey, Johr. R., Harwood. No. Dak. 
Corbin, Oliver I,.. Creede, Colo. 
Cross, R. S., Winthrop and Gibbon, Minn. 
Cutler. Frederick M., Armour. So. Dak. 
Donovan, David, Madison. Minn. 
Egerland, Franz. Crete. Neb. 
Hartley, John, Enid, Okla. 
Jackson, Frank D., Omaha, Neb. 
Jones, John A., Plymouth, Neb. 
Jones, Samuel. Carroll. Neb. 
Lich, John, Sioux Falls. So. Dak. 
Oehler. William, St. Paul. Minn. 
Osthoff, Eugene C, Lincoln. Neb. 
Peebles, David, Bountiful, Utah. 
Preiss, John M., Endicott. Wash. 
Ritchie, George, Sandy, Utah. 
Wilcox, Charles E, Biwabtk. Minn. 
Woods, Merrick W.. Stafford and Plevna. Kan. 
Wotb, Friedrich, Gcrmantown and Oak Grove, 

Neb. 
Wright, A. C El Paso, Texas. 



APRIL, 1899 



Not in commission last year 

Boss, Roger C, Gillette. Colo. 

Brooks. Edw. L., Detroit City, Minn. 

Bruce, D. G., Big Horn, Wyo. 

Burr, Huber, Ontario. Or 

Clark, Allen, Farris and Cass Lake, Minn. 

Culver, F. J., Pasadena. So. Cal. 

Davies, Arthur E., Burwell, Neb. 

Dickerson, G. H., Gillette. Colo. 

Fisher, J. B., China and Welsh. La. 

Gardner, Edward V., Grand Island, Neb. 

Ham. Richard K., Ocean View and San Francisco, 

No. Cal. 
Hanna, Thomas, Cottonwood, No. Cal. 
Harwell, J. H., Gentry, Ark. 

Hauptman, William. Monroe and Wattsville, Neb. 
Hulen, John J., Spokane. Wash. 
Husband, Chas. H , Dunlap, Kan. 
Jager, Hans J., Walnut Grove, Minn. 
Lathrop, S. E., Lake Nebagamon, Wis. 
Martin, Albert A., Prentice. Wis. 
Mason, John R., Indianapolis, Ind. 
Miller, F. G., Morrison, Union and Pleasant Hill, 

Okla. 
Paradis, Eucher, Lacasine, La. 
Risser. Henry A., St. Paul. Minn. 
Scofisld, Francis E., Dora, Or. 
Tracy. A. E., San Louis Obispo. So. Cal. 
Turrell. Charles W., Medford. Okla. 
Watt. Richard, Graceville. Minn. 
Whiddon, W. Z., General Missionary work in 

Texas. 

Re-commissioned 

Ahnstrom, Jonas M., South Minneapolis, Minn. 
Anderson. Frank H.. Omaha. Neb. 
Andrewson, Seven M., Merrill, Wis. 
Bird, Martin B , Brainerd, Minn. 
Bjorklund, Ernest V., Mankato and Kasota, 
Minn. 



Bjuge, Carl B.. Minneapolis, Minn. 

Blomquist, Charles F., Fosston, Minn. 

Bollinger, Edward S , Astoria, Or. 

Booth, Edwin, Jr., Long Pine. Neb. 

Bormose, Niels N., Philadelphia. Penn. 

Bortel, Harvey B.. Aitkin. Minn. 

Bostwick, Elmer D.. Big Timber, Mont. 

Bright. David F., Lyons, Colo. 

Burroughs. Walter A.. Washington, Ind. 

Butler. Elmer W.. Melbourne, Fla. 

Carroll. W. Irvkig. Dallas. Texas. 

Conry, Henry W., Pond Creek. Okla. 

Cross, Rowland S., Winthrop. Minn. 

Danford, James W., Brownton and Stewart, 

Minn. 
Darling, Miss May, Mcintosh. Minn. 
Fellows, Charles B., General Missionary and 

Evangelist, Minn. 
Field, James P., Chillicothe. Mo. 
Goshen, Elmer, Ogden, Utah. 
Harger, Charles H., Littleton. Colo. 
Hansen, C. J , Komstad. So. Dak. 
Hawkes, George B.. Indian Valley, Idaho. 
Hayes. Francis L., Manitou, Colo. 
Henderson, Thomas H.. Salem, Or. 
Herlov, Rasmus. Chicago. 111. 
Hull. Ellsworth L.. Whitewater. Colo. 
Jensen, Charles J.. Ogdensburg, Union, W T au- 

paca, Unity and Easton, Wis. 
Jones. Thomas R., Pittsburgh. Penn. 
Jordan, William T., Trinidad. Colo. 
Larkin. Ralph B., Buena Vista, Colo. 
Lee, Vinton, Iowa, La. 
Lee, Vinton. Vinton, La. 
Lewis, Frank F., Holdrege, Neb. 
Lodvvick, William, Stewartville, Minn. 
Luck, Charles W.. Weiser. Idaho. 
Lyons, Eli C, Springfield. Minn. 
McCallie. Thomas S., Chattanooga. Tenn. 
Mack, Charles A., Inkster and Orr. No. Dak. 
Marsh, Wilson J., Guthrie, Okla 
Miller, Charles G., Kansas City. Kan. 
Moffat, T. Clemence, Wymore, Neb. 



July, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



45 



Moore, Frank L., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Moore, George W., Frostburg, Md. 

Murray, Edward W, Brightwood, Ind. 

Norton, Milton J., St. Louis, Mo. 

Nott, J. Lee, Benson, Minn 

O'Brien, James P., Penn Valley and Genisee, 
Miss., Kansas City, Mo. 

Olsson, Carl F., Titusville, Penn. 

Palmer, Oscar A., Springfield, Mo. 

Parsons, Henry W., St. Paul, Minn. 

Pederson, Jens H., Hoboken, N. J. 

Petersen, Hans, Washburn, Wis. 

Petterson, John. Clear Lake, Wis. 

Phillips, John W., Oakland, No. Cal. 

Pierce, Albert E., Solsberry and Cincinnati, Ind. 

Pope, Joseph, Columbus and Laurel, Mont. 

Preston, Charles W. Curtis, Neb. 

Preston, Jared R., Jamestown, Ind. 

Roberts. Thomas S., Osawatomie and Indianapo- 
lis, Kan. 

Ruge, L. H., El Reno, Okla. 

Selden, Mrs. C. S., New York City and Brooklyn, 
N. Y. 

Sheldon, C. F., Enid, Okla. 

Skeels, Henry M., Harman, Colo. 



Smith, Mrs. Esther, Sebeka, Minn. 
Smith, Howard N., Cleburne, Texas. 
Smith, J. Challen, Alexandria, Ind. 
Smith, Thomas, Porter, Ind. 
Smith, William, Nanticoke, Penn. 
Stewart, W. E. M., Douglas. Wyo. 
Sutherland, John M., Terre Haute, Ind. 
Swanstrom, August, St. Joseph, Mo. 
Tannehill, Annie H., Choctaw City, Okla. 
Thomas, Charles M.. New Castle, Colo. 
Toomay, John B., Sedalia, Mo. 
Triplett. Harry M.. Ainsworth, Neb. 
Vogler, Henry, Friedens, So. Dak. 
Walton, Richard C, Kansas City, Mo. 
Watson, William H.. Red Lodge. Mon. 
Weage, A. D., Villa Park, So. Cal. 
Wells, Mark, Baltimore, Md. 
Wells, Clayton B., Elyria, Colo. 
White, Levi, Indianapolis, Ind. 
Wilkinson, William A., North Branch and Sun- 
rise, Minn. 
Winter, Alpheus, Tryon, N. C. 
Wood, Edwin A., Garvin and Custer, Minn. 
Woodford, Burton H., Dayton, Wyo. 
Wrigley, Francis, Campbell, Minn. 



MAY, 1899 



Not in commission last year 

Beitel, Julius H.. Palisade, Neb. 

Betts, William W., Andrews and Amboy, Ind. 

Boylan, F. G., Cortez, Colo. 

Brunker, Thomas A., Tabor and Mt. Zion, Okla. 

Bryant, John W., Lorella, Or. 

Buswell, Jesse, Kingfisher, Okla. 

Butler, Franklin C, Clackamas, Or. 

Cash, Elijah, Sherman, So. Cal. 

Chase, Charles E., Etna, No. Cal. 

Cutler, Fred M., Armour, So. Dak. 

Habbick, John D., Los Angeles. So. Cal. 

Harper, Thomas, Newkirk, Okla. 

Hawkins, N. H., Red Cliff, Minturn and Oilman, 

Colo. 
Jones, Fred V., Reno, Nev. 
Jones, Thomas J., Steamboat Springs, Colo. 
Kidder, Josiah, Bruce, So. Dak. 
Leffingwell, Austin N., North Enid, Okla. 
Levick, Stephen, Colwich, Kan. 
Longren, Charles W., Montrose, Colo. 
Mathes, George F.. Perris, So. Cal. 
Merrill, Harry E., San Jacinto and Lakeview, So. 

Cal. 
Radford, Mrs. Catherine W., Custer, So. Dak. 
Rarey, George M., West Guthrie, Okla. 
Robjent, Thomas S., Braddock, Penn. 
Ruge, Louis H., El Reno, Okla. 
Saunders, Harry L., Wellston, Okla. 
Sewell, B. F., Perry, Okla. 
Slavinskie, Miss Barbara, Bay City, Mich. 
Soza, Juan, Tempe, Ariz. 
Tatum, Christopher C, Tecumseh, Okla. 
Todd, D. E., Waukomis, Calvary and Turkey 

Creek, Okla. 
Vavrina, Miss Katherine, Iowa City, Iowa. 
Walters, Luther M., Fresno, No. Cal. 
Wiley, H.S., Cooperstown and vicinity, No. Dak. 

Re-commissioned 

Akeson, Ludwig, Dover, N. J. 

Anderson, Emil A., Lake City, Minn. 

Atherton, Isaac W., Spring Valley and Jamul, So. 

Cal. 
Bassett, Franklin H., New Brighton, Minn. 
Belt, S. D, Paso Robles, So. Cal. 
Bentley, Frank D.. Duluth, Minn. 
Brown, James M.. Keystone, So. Dak. 
Brown, John F., Los Alamitos, So. Cal. 
Chakurian, Enoch E., Fields Landing, Humboldt 

Co., No. Cal, 



Cinyburg, Miss Clara, St. Louis, Mo. 

Compton, Herbert E., Fessenden, No. Dak. 

Cookman, Isaac, Hennessey, Okla. 

De Kay, George H., Norwalk, So. Cal. 

Drake, Ellis R., Denver, Colo. 

Earl, James, Granite Falls and Belview, Minn. 

Earl, Theophilus R., La Mesa and San Diego, 

Cal. 
Eckel, Frank E., Julesburg, Colo. 
English, Isaac N., Bertha. Minn. 
Fuller, Edgar R., Bakersfield, So. Cal. 
Foster, Frank, St. Louis, Mo. 
Forbes, Charles A.. Leadville, Colo. 
Gordon, William, Scotia, No. Cal. 
Gray, David B., Sylvan, Or. 
Griffith, William E., Perham, Minn. 
Hadden, Robert A., Minneapolis, Minn. 
Harper, Richard H., Fruita, Colo. 
Hill, Charles F., Cardonia and Perth, Ind. 
Hills, William S., Garfield, Kan. 
Huelster, Anton, Detroit, Mich. 
Hurlburt, Wallace, Condon, Or. 
Hurlburt, Wallace, Freewater, Or. 
Jelinek, John, Braddock. Penn. 
Jelinek, Joseph, Milwaukee, Wis. 
Jenkins, Josiah H., Denver, Colo. 
Johnson, William, St. Louis, Mo. 
Josephson, Hans F., Winona, Minn. 
Kelsey. William, Alpha, Parker and Otter, Okla. 
Lind, Nels J , St. Louis, Mo. 
Lopez, J. M., New York City, N. Y. 
Lyman, William A., Pierre, So. Dak. 
McKinney, Samuel T., St. Louis, Mo. 
Martin, C. R., Fargo. No. Dak. 
Moore, William N., Great Falls, Mont. 
Moats, John W.. Pawnee, Okla. 
Morgan, David W., Buena Park, So. Cal. 
Murphy, James S., Okarche, Okla. 
Nelson, A. G., Center City, Sandstone and Ebal, 

Minn. 
Norse, E. L., Park Falls and Butternut, No. 

Wis. 
Ohlson, Olof, Glenwood, Minn. 
Osinek, Miss Antonie, Braddock, Penn. 
Paulu, Anton, Vining, Iowa. 
Pearson, John L., Alpine. So. Cal. 
Perks, Harry, Adin, No. Cal. 
Plant, Gus O., Renovo. Penn. 
Reynolds, Lauriston. Redfield, £0. Dak. 
Riley, Charles A.. Fairmount, Ind. 
Ritchie. George, Sandy, Utah. 
Robertson, George, Men tone. So. Cal. 
Rogers, Samuel J.. Minneapolis, Minn. 



46 



The Home Missionary 



July, 



Rowell, Nathan I... Los Angeles, So. Cal. 

Rnndus, John, Crete, Neb. 

Searles, George R .. Hancock, Minn. 

Sheldon, Charles F.. Enid, Okla. 

Smith, Charles W., Flagler, Colo. 

Snell, Charles V , Redondo Beach, So. Cal. 

Staub, lohn J . Portland, Or. 

Stringer, Firth, St. Louis, Mo, 



Thirloway. Timothy, Buffalo Gap and W. G. 

Flat, So. Dak. 
Thompson, Alex. W.. Etiwanda, So. Cal. 
Wellman, Wheeler M., Darlington, Okla. 
Willett, Geonre, Whittier, So. < al 
Wolcott, William H.. Moreno and Alcssandro, So. 

Cal. 
Wrbitsky, E., St. Louis, Mo. 



RECEIPTS 

For account of receipts by State Auxiliary Societies, see pages 67 to 76 

MARCH, 1899 



MAINE-$i 7 g.o8. 

Augusta, M. J. Cooledge 85 00 

Bar Harbor, by Dea W.Clark 1030 

Bath, Central Ch . *.>v I. C. Ledyard . 61 70 

Winter Street Cn.'b'y F. H. Low.. 81 08 

Bucksport, Mrs. E. Ruck 1000 

Hallowell, Ladies' Cent Soc , by M 

C. Dole 11 00 



NEW HAMPSHIRE « 5 6 4 . 4 i;of which 
legacy, $218.25. 

F. C. I. and H. M Union of N. H., 
Miss A. A M Farland, Treas.: 

" A Friend in ,\. H " 50 00 

A Friend 100 00 

150 00 

Amherst, " B " 150 00 

Bennington, by R. Knowles 3 00 

Claremont, Y. P. S. C. E.. by Miss S. 

V. Marsh, for Alaska 500 

Hinsdale, by E. F. Wellman 6 76 

Lancaster, A Friend 40 

Little Ferry, Evan. Ch . by Rev. F. 

W.Martin 600 

Manchester. Y. P. S. C. E., of the 

First, by H. G.Woodruff, for Alaska 5 00 
Mason, On account of Estate of Mrs. 

L. A. Barnes, by L. D. Stevens, 

Esq 2i3 25 

New Ipswich, J. E. F. Marsh 500 

Rochester, '■ M. W. H." 500 

West Hampstead, N. Ordway 10 00 



VERMOXT-$i,33o.; 7 . 

Vermont Dom. Miss Soc, by J. M. 

Cushman 96 15 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. R. P. 
Fairbanks. Treas.: 

Pittsford, by Mrs. G. W. Harmon.. 2 00 

Randolph Center, Homeland Circle 5 00 

Rochester, A Friend , 5 00 

Sheldon 800 

South Duxbury, A Friend 5 00 

St. Albans 20 00 

St. Johnsbury, South Ch., A Friend 25 00 

Whiting, " In Memoriam " 200 

West Glover 6 00 

78 00 

Brattleboro, A Friend 1.000 00 

Burlington, J. B. Stearns 5 00 

St. Johnsbury. " March 17 "' 20000 

St. Johnsbury Center, S. S. Rally, by 

C. McLaughlin 1 62 



MASSACHUSETTS — $12,901.62; of 
w huh lega< c s, $9,964.72. 

Mass. Home Miss. Soc, by Rev. E. I!. 
Palmer. Treas : 
By request of donors of which for 
Debt, SJtoo ; Alaska, $76.70 $2,43998 

Andover. Estate of Edward Taylor, 

by O. B. Taylor, ex 200 00 

Berkley. Friends of Home Missions. . 5000 

Beverly, V P. S. C. E. of the Second. 

by C. L. Lummus. for Alaska 3 00 

Boston, Estate of Rev. L. Farnham, 

interest, by A. Fiske, ex 24 03 

W. A. Wilde, for Salary Fund 50 00 

S. H. Woodbridge 15 00 

Brockton, Estate of Cephas Soule, by 

Dr. S. J. Gruver. ex 1.200 00 

Dedham, Legacy of Ebenezer Paul, 

by E. T. Paul, adm 50000 

Enfield. Estate of J B. Woods, by Rev. 

R. M. Woods, trustee 80 00 

Estate of Mrs. M. P. McClary.on ac- 
count, by W. Kimball 100 co 

Fitchburg, S. S.. by K. G. Keyes 10 10 

Greenwich Village, Mrs. A. R. Cutler. 2 00 

Hatfield. Estate of S. H. Dickinson. 

by D. W. Wells 950 00 

Rev. R M. Woods 40 00 

Holyoke. First, by J. H. Wvlie. Jr ... 27 00 

Y. P. S. C. E. of the Second, by A. 
L. Whittin, for Alaska 10 00 

A Friend 10 

Lee, Estate of Elizur Smith, by D. S. 

Smith, ex 1,20000 

Lowell, Legacv of Charles Littlefield, 

by Mrs. M. H. Littlefield, ex 500 00 

Ludlow ('enter. First, bv H E Miller. 10 00 

Mattapoisett. by Miss S. W. Hiller... 15 05 

Monson, by E F.Morris 29 11 

New Bedford, Trinity Ch.. by J. C. 

Briggs 43 34 

North Ch., by E. Holmes 25 00 

Northampton, Dorcas Soc. in the 

First, by Mrs. J. E. Clark, for Salary 

Fund 562; 

Sheffield, by A. T. Wakefield 4 82 

Shelburne. Y. P. S. C. E.. by J. A. 

Goodrich 615 

Somerville, Estate of Henry Howard. 

by F. A. Morse, adm 200 00 

South Framingham. Grace Ch.. Miss 

E. Merriam, by Rev. W. G. Puddc- 

foot 100 00 

Spencer. Estate of W T illiam M. Bemis, 

by J. H. Ames, ex 3 416 69 

Springfield. Estate of Levi Graves, by 

D. W. Wells, trustee 70 00 

Sudbury, Legacy of S. B. Rogers, by 

A. W. Rogers, e.\ 50000 



July, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



47 



Westboro, Nancy A. Burnap, by F. E. 

Corey, adm §250 co 

Worcester, Estate of Mrs. J. Bliss, by 

S. A. Pratt, ex 974 00 



RHODE ISLAND— $50.00. 

Providence, Union Ch., by R. F. 
Brown to const. Miss Bertha Hatton 
Smith a L. M 



CONNECTICUT— $2,098.56 ; of which 
legacy, $1,000.00. 

Miss. Soc. of Conn., D. N. Camp, Sec. 116 75 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. W. W. 
Jacobs, Treas. : 
Hartford, First Ch., special 6 50 

Ansonia, by Rev. W. G. Puddefoot... 24 00 

Berlin, Golden Ridge Mission Circle, 
of which $25. in full, to const. 
Louise Shumway a L. M. and $25, 
toward L. Mp. of Juanita Field by 
M. B. Wickwire 50 00 

Bridgeport, First, Mary Barnes 
Palmer Mission Circle, by Miss A. 

H. Hincks, for Salary Fund 25 00 

Park Ch., $142 ; Y. P. S.C.E., $8, 
by A. S. Hall to const. E. Marsh, 
C. L. Beach, and Miss E. L. Beers 
L. Ms 15000 

East Haven, by Mrs. W. S. Coker. . 22 00 

Greenwich, S. S. of the Second, by H. 
O. Child, for Alaska 25 00 

Hartford, In loving memory of M. 

C. H 

A Friend 

Kensington, Ch., by Mrs. N. F. Tay- 
lor 

Madison, First, by F.. A. Kelsey 

Middlebury, by R. M. Fenn. . .". 

By Rev. W. G. Fuddefcot 

Middletown, Mrs. H. L. Ward, by E. 
P. Angus to const. Mrs. H. C. Ward 
aL. M 

Milford, First, " F. J. B." 

Mohegan. by Rev. C. E. Bromley 

New London. First Ch. of Christ, by 

P. Le R. Harwood 

A Friend in the First Ch 

New Milford, H. Ives 

Poquonock, A Friend 

Salisbury, Woman's Board of Home 
Missions, by Mrs. L. Warner 

Seymour, by C. J. Atwater 

Sharon, Y. P. S. C. E., by C. P. Tay- 
lor, for Alaska 

S imsbury, Legacy of Mrs. L. C. Ham- 
lin, by H. M. Lyman 

Southburg, by Rev. W. H. Barrows. . 

Terry ville, by G. C. Clark 

Thomaston, Y. P. S. C. E..of the 
First, by C. E. Parke, for Alaska. .. 

West Hartford, M. O. Richards, 
special 

Westminster, by A. C. Greene 

Winsted, First Ch., $57.85 ; Y. P. S. 

C. E., $5, by J. P. Cook 6285 



NEW YORK — $4,985.48 ; of which 
legacies, $1,115.00. 

Received by R. W. Spalding, Treas : 

Antwerp 

Ash ville 

Black Creek 

Bridgewater 

Brookl y n , Lewis Ay ....,..,., . . , , , . 



250 

50 


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14 

20 
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28 

OO 

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63 98 


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40 



Buffalo, Rev. C. E. Page S12 50 

Corning, 10 91 

Fairview, Welsh 15 00 

Grand Island 3 50 

Homer, Ch., $4 ; E. G. Ranney, $20. 24 00 

Java, Ch., $6.30 ; C. E. Soc, $1 7 30 

Lake wood n 50 

New York, Camp Memorial 32 00 

Norfolk, C. E. Soc 500 

North Pitcher 3 00 

Pitcher 8 41 

Port Leyden, " Emergency Fund ". 6 00 

Pulaski 22 55 

Riverhead, Emergency Fund .... 12 75 
Syracuse, Good Will, S. S. Emer- 
gency Fund 9 74 

Geddes 12 51 

Utica, Rev. Lewis Williams 10 00 

Westmoreland 9 63 

Wilmington 2 00 

Willsborough 6 75 

Supply, E. Curtis 2175 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. J. J. 
Pearsall, Treas. : 

Albany, Home Circle 

Barryville, Aux 

Brooklyn, Plymouth Ch 

Buffalo, Pilgrim 

Mr. Mclntyre's S. S. class 

Cortlandt 

Fairport 

Homer, C. E. S 

New York Broadway Tab. S. W. W. 

Riverhead 

Sherburne 

Susquehanna Assoc. Annual Meet- 
ing 

Syracuse, Goodwill Ch. , W. A 

Walton 



Albany, A Friend 

Berkshire, First, by S. L. Ball 

Brooklyn, Plymouth Ch., by W. H. 
Crittenden 

South Ch., $79.77 : Branch S. S., of 
South Ch., $15, by E. B. Olney. . . 

Ch. of the Pilgrims, by A. M. Hatch 

Puritan, by H. A. W. Goll 

Canandaigua. legacy of Mrs. S. A. 

Hayes, by E. G. Hayes 

Candor, by E. J. Woodford 

E. A. Booth 

Deansboro, by Rev. C. W. Mason. . . . 
Eldred and Barryville, by Rev. J. F. 

Whitney 

Gloversville, Ch., by D. H. Tarr 

Homer, Legacy of Mrs. L. A. Payne, 

by E. G. Ranney, Ex 

Ithaca, Y.P.S.C.E., $10; Rev. W. E. 

Griffis, D.D., $10, for Alaska 

Lockport. Y.P.S.C.E of East Avenue 

Ch., by Miss P. A. Knight, for 

Alaska 

Margaretville, Miss M. I. Ward 

Mt. Vernon, First, by J. M. Hurd 

New York City, Broadway Tab., by 
N. C. Fisher 

Manhattan Cong. Ch., by F. H. 
Meserve 

Rev. H. Lewis 

Mrs. S. E. Gillum 

Northfield, Union Soc. of Cong. Ch., 

by W. S. Webb.. 

North Lawrence. Mrs. N. Williams... 
Perry Center, Estate of Mrs. S. C. 

Alton, on account, by L. A. Hay- 
ward. Ex 

Port Chester, by C. S, Whitney. 



432 



7 OO 
50 OO 
14 OO 

5 00 
40 OO 
35 00 

1 00 
40 00 
18 CO 

65 OO 

9 00 
14 00 
10 00 



35 00 
45 00 



94 77 
857 71 
126 97 

IOO OO 

7 5° 

IOO OO 

4 5o 

4 00 
60 30 

1,000 CO 

20 OO 



IO OO 

4 00 
50 OO 



86 66 

5 °o 
25 00 



15 00 
18 75 



4 8 



The Home Missionary 



July, 



Saratoga Springs, N. E. Ch., of which 
$5.25 from Y. P. S. C. E. for Alaska, 

by G. A. Kinsel 830 49 

Seneca Falls, First, by H. W. Knight 13 65 

Sidney, First, by M. C. Johnston 20 65 



Demorest, Union Ch., by Rev. W. O. 

Phillips $2 00 

Duluth, by Rev. W. F. Brewer 2 00 

Walker's Chapel, by Rev. G. Home.. 6 35 



NEW JERSEY-$533 56. 

Asbury Park, First, by G. A. Smock. 26 50 

Bloomtield, Mrs. J. Oakes 10 00 

Dover, Swedish Ch., by Rev. L. 

Akeson 2 50 

East Orange, Trinity Ch., by H. R. 

Halsey 200 73 

Passaic, by A. Turner 25 00 

Perth Amboy, by Rev. O. G. Norseen 4 00 

Plainfield. S. S., by G. A. Powlison 12 66 

By M. C. Van Arsdale 214 88 

Upper Montclair, Union Cong., S. S., 

by Dr. H. M. Ayers 27 29 

Woodbridge, Y. P. S. C. E. of the 

First, by L. M. Dally, for Alaska. . . 10 00 



PENNSYLVANIA— $660.13 ; °f which 
legacy, $525.00. 

Blossburg, Second, by Rev. T. D. 

Henshaw 

Centerville, Ch , L. C. Walker, $10; 

J. L. Clark, $1 ; Y. P. S. C. E., $5, 

by Mrs. J. B. Clark ... 

Chandler's Valley, Free Evan. Scand. 

Ch., by Rev. C. J. Lundquist 

Horatio, $4.00, and Lindsey, $1.88, 

by Rev. I. Thomas 

Lancaster, A Friend 

Mt. Carmel, First, by Rev. R. N. 

Harris 

Monterey, Hawley Memo. Ch., by 

Rev. T. W.Jones, D.D 

Philadelphia, Estate of Philena Fobes, 
by Rev. G. P. Moore, Ex 

Central Ch., Dr. and Mrs. W. Stover, 
by Rev. Dr. Richards 

Snyder Avenue, by J. H. Cressman 

A Friend 

Scranton, First, by D. D. Evans 

Vandling, by J . G. Evans 

Warren, Scand. Bethel Ch., by Rev. 

J. A. Dahlgren 

Wilkesbarre, First, by R. George 

MARYLAND— $6.co. 
Frostburg, by Rev. G. W. Moore 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA— $481.75. 

Woman's H. M. Union of the N. J. 
Asso., Mrs. J. H. Denison, 
Treas. : 

Washington, First, for Salary Fund 

Washington, First, by W. Lamborn.. 
Mt. Pleasant Ch., by W. D. Quinter. 

NORTH CAROLINA-$i6.2o. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. A. E. 
Farrington, Treas. : 

King's Mountain, by M. E. Newton.. 

Tryon. Ch. of Christ, by Rev. A. 

Winter 



GEORGIA-$i 5 . 35 . 

Atlanta, Immanuel Ch., by Rev. S. C. 
McDaniel 



8 


00 


12 


91 


12 


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25 
7 


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10 


00 



4 


00 


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3 


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97 



I 76 



II II 
3 00 
5 00 



ALABAMA— $24.12. 

Arbacoochee, Flowery Grove Ch.and 
Cherry Mt. Grove Ch., by Rev. E. 
J. Loveless 

Chulafinne, Fairview Ch., by Rev. 
W. M. Oswalt 

Hanceville, Mt. Grove Ch., Tidmore, 
Nectar, and High Rock Ch's., by 
Rev. J. D. Fbust 

Shelby, Ch. of the Covenant, by Rev. 
A. T. Clarke 



LOUISIANA-$2o.S 7 . 

Woman's Missionary Union, Miss M. 
L. Rogers, Treas. : 

Hammond, Ch., $8.73 ; S. S., $2.38, 

by J. Q. Adams 

Vinton, First, by Rev. V. Lee 

Welsh, by Rev. E . Paradis 

FLORIDA— $108.65. 

Belleair, by Rev. E. P. Herrick 

Coatsville, Pleasant Hill Ch., by Rev. 

J. D. Blankenship 

Crestview, Holley and Laurel Hill, by 

Rev. D. A. Simmons 

Daytona, by W. Atwood 

Key West. First, by Rev. C.W. Frazer. 
Sanford, People's Ch., by Rev. C. 

Campbell 

Tavares and Ocoee, by Rev. L. J. 

Donalson 

Thonotosassa, bv Rev. E. P. Herrick. 
West Palm Beach, by Rev. S. D. Paine 



OKLAHOMA— $84.39. 

Alva, Olivet Ch., by Rev. N. W. Han- 

kemeyer 

Cold water, by Rev. J. H. Parker 

Downs, Bevier Brunker, $1.56 ; Mrs. 

Brunker, 44 cents, by Rev. T. A. 

Brunker 

Glenella, by Rev. J. H. Parker 

Guthrie. Plymouth Ch., by Rev. W. J. 

Marsh 

Jennings and Bryan, by Rev. E. P. 

Owen 

Kingfisher, Union Ch., by Rev. J. H. 

Parker 

Oklahoma, Victory Ch., by Rev. J. B. 

Weatherman . 

Perry, Lawnvievv Ch., by Rev. B. F. 

Sewell 

Ridgeway, by J. Wilson 

Stillwater, by Rev. W. Spence 

Vittum Mem. and Burwick, by Rev. 

C. J. Rives 

Wellston, First, by H. L. Saunders.. 



NEW MEXICO-$ 7 .5o. 

Gallup, First, by Rev. P. A. Simpkin. 2 50 

San Rafael, by Rev. G. E. Birlew 5 00 



3 


33 




5° 


1 


00 


44 


10 


19 


00 


6 


00 


7 


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2 


22 


25 


00 



4 


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1 


00 


2 


00 


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10 


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00 


8 


00 



TENNESSEE— $2.00. 
5 00 Hudsonburg, Miss A. M. Jackson... 



July, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



49 



OHIO— $3,257.12 

$1,921.25. 



of which legacy, 



Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser, D. D. : 
Albion, Pa., Self Denial, by Rev. C. 

W. Grape 

Alexis, by Rev. W. S. Col ton 

Ashtabula, Finnish, by Rev. F. Leh- 

tinen , 

Brownhelm, by Samuel Racon 

Center Belpre, by Rev. H. O. Judd. 

Chatham, by Mrs. C. A. Moody 

Chillicothe, by H. G. Cranston 

Cincinnati, D. B. Meacham 

Dr. J. Taft 

Clarksfield, by Mrs. S. E. Winans.. 

Cleveland, Arch wood Avenue, by J. 

R. Peck... 

First, Y. P." Bible Class,' by F. V. 

Anderson, for Bohemian Work. 

Euclid Avenue, by Justin Snow. . . 

For Bohemian Work 

Bethlehem, by A. R. Teagle and 

Dr. Schauffler 

Swedish, by Rev. D. Marcelius... 
Olivet Ch., $4 ; C. E., $2 ; by Rev. 

T. A. Humphreys 

Collinwood. Additional, by Rev. G. 

R. Berry 

Dover, S. S., by D. D. Osborn 

Elyria, E. W. Metcalf 

Fairport, by Rev. W. D. Fergu- 



Plymouth Ch., $10; L. M. S., $3.50, 

by Rev. P. W. Sinkes 

W. F. McMillen 



$1 00 



Geneva, special coll., by S. S. Searle. 

Grafton, by Miss M. Cordrey 

Hudson, by Miss E. E. Metcalf 

Huntington, West Va., by C. O. 

Mickel 

Kelloggsville, by Rev. H. J. Tavlor. 
Kirtland, K. E. S., by Rev. U. C. 

Bosworth 

Lexington, by Rev. H. F. Thomp- 
son 

Lorain, by Rev. T. D. Phillips 

Marysville, by Rev. W. S. Bugbey. 

Additional 

Nelson, by Rev. Emily C. Woodruff. 

Newton Falls, by S. S. Borland 

North Amherst, by Rev. P. E. 

Harding 

Norwalk, by Rev. T. J. Collier 

Painesville, First, by Rev. A. F. 

Skeele 

Portsmouth, by Albert Hales 

Radnor. Ch., $5; S. S., $15; by Rev. 

J. V. Stephens 

Richmond, by Rev. W. D. Fergu- 

■ son 

Rootstown, W. M. S., $5 ; C. E.. $3 ; 
S. S., $7.50; by H. A. Deming. 

W. J. Dickinson 

Sale of Communion service, Saint 

Mary 

Sandusky, by H. H. West 

South Newbury, by B. E. Colvin... 
Strongsville, by P. R. Gibbons 

C. E.,by F. N. Fish 

Sullivan, S. S., by Rev. G. Hill 

Tallmadge, by John W. Seward in 

full to const. Mrs. L. J. Wright a 

L. M 

Toledo, Plymouth, by Rev. G. W. 

Belsey 

Wakeman, Ch., $6.13 ; C. E., $10; 

S. S., $11, by W. G. Ferver 

Wauseon, by Jennie L. Gray 

Marcus Lyon 

West Andover, by Henry Holcomb. 
West Millgrove, by Rev. S. B. 

Crosby 

Weymouth, by Rev. L. W. Mahn . . . 

York, by Rev. L. W. Mahn 

Youngstown, Elm St., by Rev. J. B. 
Davies 



2 


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7 
87 


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5° 


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00 


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9 


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15 


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16 
16 


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50 


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9 
9 


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63 


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3 


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00 


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9 


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5 


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5 


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5 


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5 


00 


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00 


16 


00 


27 

16 


13 

35 


5° 


00 


4 


41 


4 


00 


4 
6 


55 
00 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. G. B. 

Brown, Treas.; of which $124.66 

for Bohemian Work. 

Akron, Arlington St 

Ashtabula 

Bellevue 

Center Belpre, C. E. . 

Chardon 

Chatham 

Cincinnati, Walnut Hill 

North Fairmont 

Vine 

Claridon 

Clarksfield 

Cleveland. First 

Plymouth 

Madison Avenue 

C.E 

Lake View, W. A 

Collinwood 

Columbus, Plymouth 

Eastwood 

Cuyahoga Falls 

Cortland 

Ellsworth. Mrs. B. W. Allen 

Elyria, First 

Garrettsville 

Gomer, L. A. S 

Greenwich 

Hudson 

Huntsbury, K. E. S 

Kent 

Lorain 

Madison 

Mansfield, First 

Mayflower 

Marietta, First 

Y.L. M.S 

Maryville, Mrs. Bugbey's Dime 
Bank 

W. M. S 

S. S 

Mt. Vernon, C.E 

W.M.S 

New London 

North Amherst 

North Fairfield 

North Ridgeville 

Norwalk 

Oberlin, First. L. A. S. to const. 

Mrs. Emma Bates a L.M 

Plain Bohemian Work 

Ravenna 

Rochester 

Sandusky, L. U 

Saybrook. C. E. 

Sheffield.'. 

Springfield, First, C. E. Folger's 
Dime Bank 

W.M. S 

Sullivan 

Toledo, Central 

Unionville 

S. S. Bohemian Work 

Plymouth, $10 ; S. S., $6 

Vermillion 

Wauseon, S. S. Bohemian Work 

West Millgrove, L. A .S 



5 


00 


5 


25 


3 


75 


3 


00 


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15 


00 


10 


00 


2 


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9 


45 


7 


00 


4 


00 


2 


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2 


5° 


2 


5° 


5 


00 


10 


00 


2 


80 


3 


16 


3 


00 


25 


00 


5 


00 


3 


00 


2 


00 


6 


00 


6 


00 


8 


37 


5 


00 


9 


50 


36 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


1 


00 


2 


00 


2 


50 


6 


55 


1 


5° 


5 


00 


1 


00 


3 


00 


2 


50 


5° 


00 


5 


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10 


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3 °° 

5 °° 
5 00 
5 00 

11 00 
5 00 
5 00 

16 00 
5 °° 
3 °° 
5 °° 



6 25 



4*7 33 

Brownhelm, Birthday offerings, by 

F.Perry 100 

Burton, Estate of Lucinda Beach . . . 1,921 25 

Elmore, P. B. Warriner 2 00 

Ellsworth, David A. Allen deceased, 

by Mrs. B. W. Allen 25 00 

Oberlin, A Friend for the debt 100 00 



5° 



The Home Missionary 



July, ii 



INDIANA— $296.53. 

Received by Rev. E. D. Curtis : 

Anderson. Hope Ch $2200 

Fremont 1 65 

Hobart 600 

Indianapolis. Pilgrim Ch 8 66 

Union Ch . . . . 4 95 

Mocksville, Bethany Ch .. 1 35 

Orland 32 30 

Porter... 1500 

Ridgeville Ch., $13.40; S. S. and 
Junior C. E., $3.50; by Eunice 

Curtis 16 90 

Shipshewana 6 5c 

Terre Haute, Second 1325 



128 56 

Woman's H. M. Union, by Mrs. W. 

A. Bell : 

Amboy $1 00 

East Chicago 1500 

Ft. Wayne 20 00 

Indianapolis, Union Ch 200 

Ladies' Union. Plymouth 2600 

Hobart 3 50 

Kokomo 7800 

Porter 1000 

Ridgeville 500 

Terre Haute. First 15 00 

Second 2 00 

117 50 

Alexandria, by Rev. J. C. Smith 25 

Coal Bluff and Caseyville, by Rev. R. 

E.Roberts 1000 

Elkhart, Y. P. S. C. E. of the First, 

by Miss A. M. Smith 10 00 

Michigan City, First, by A. Nichols.. 21 56 
West Indianapolis, Pilgrim Ch., by 

Rev. J. Gordon 8 66 



ILLINOIS— $54.50. 

Illinois Home Miss. Soc, by A. B. 

Mead, Treas., for Alaska 25 00 

Woman's H. M. Union, Miss B. E. 

Crosby, Treas 13 00 

Rockford, Second 16 50 



MISSOURI— $84789. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. K. L. 
Mills, Treas. : 

Aurora 80 

Y. P. S. C. E 40 

Jr. Y. P. S. C. E 2 50 

Willing Workers 75 

Bonne Terre 25 00 

Kansas City, Ivanhoe Park Ch 3 00 

St. Louis, Memorial 1200 

Pilgrim 261 39 

First, to const. Mrs. C. W. Fitch, 
Mrs. Mary L. Conant. Mrs. C. 
L. Post. Mrs. S. E. Lowe, and 

Mrs. C. N. Stephens, L. Ms.... 250 00 

Webster Groves 47 73 

603 57 

Less expenses 30 18 

573 39 

Aurora, First, by H. H. Elliott 5 00 

Billings, 82c; Nichols, 92c, bv T. 

Chew ." 174 



Kansas City, First Ch., by E. S. Bige- 

low § 

Clyde Ch, by J. A. Hays 

Ivanhoe Park Ch., by Rev. L. War- 
ren 

Meadville, by C. A. Sturges 

St. Louis, Mem. Ch., $10.25 ; Valley 

ParkCh., $2.00, by Rev. F. Foster. 

Springfield, First, by S. Rogers 

MICHIGAN— $1.00. 

Drummond, First, by Rev. G. D. 
Strickland 

WISCONSIN- $510.66, of which leg- 
acy, $500.00. 

Bloomer, First, by Rev. D. A. Rich- 
ardson 

Clear Lake, by Rev. J. D. Whitelaw. 

Clintonville, Scand. Ch., by Rev. A. 
Larson 

Clear Lake, Swedish Ch., by Rev. J, 
Petterson 

Merrill, Scand. Ch., by Rev. S. M. 
Andre wson 

Racine, Estate of Jane Parry, by E. 
D. Davis, Ex .-.,. 



IOWA-$3. 7 5- 

De Witt. Y. P. S. C. E., by G. E. Will- 
iams, for Alaska . 

Muscatine, W. F. Johnson 



MINNESOTA— $1,227.39. 

Received by Rev. J. H. Morley : 

Barnesville 

Claremont 

Grand Meadow 

Jr. C. E 

Hutchinson, S. S 

Minneapolis, Bethany 

Mayflower 

Robbinsdale 

Oak Park 

New Richland 

Ortonville 

S. S 

Verndale 

Winona, First 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. M. W. 
Skinner, Treas. : 

Austin 

Anoka 

Ash Creek 

Benson, S. S 

Burtrum 

Brainerd 

Cannon Falls, S. S 

Claremont 

Crookston 

Custer 

Duluth, Pilgrim 

Edgerton 

Ellsworth 

Excelsior 

Fairmont 

Faribault 

Freeborn 

Glenwood 

Grand Meadow 

Hutchinson, $5 ; Mission Band, $2 

Kanaranzi 

Lake City 

Lamberton 



25 


IS 


57 


10 


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7 


75 


12 


25 


59 


51 



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2 


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1 35 

2 40 



26 20 

10 10 
2 00 

1 5° 
5 00 

5 00 

2 5° 
4 °3 

11 00 

4 62 
8 00 

6 00 

5 00 
40 30 



131 25 



7 15 

5 00 

5° 

45 
3 °° 

1 75 
5 00 

2 00 



32 92 

2 OO 
2 OO 
2 36 

4 77 
66 50 
10 00 
2 50 
4 03 
7 CO 
2 OO 
13 CO 
2 OO 



July, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



51 



Little Falls 

Mankato 

Mapleton -, 

Mazeppa 

Morns 

Marshall 

Merriam Park 

Moorhead 

Monticello 

Minneapolis, Lena Hollister 

Park Avenue 

Plymouth 

Lowry Hill 

Lyndale, $23.53 : Jr. C. E., $2. 

Pilgrim 

Fremont Avenue 

Fifth Avenue 

Jr. C. E.... 

Open Door 

Young Ladies 

Forest Heights 

First 

Como 

Bethany 

New Pay nesville ; 

New Ulm 

Northfield 

Plainvie w 

Pillsbury 

Princeton, $11.17 ! S. S , $3.83... 

Rochester 

Robbinsdale 

Stewartville, C. E 

Springfield 

St. Anthony Park 

St. Louis Park 

S.S 

St. Paul, Pacific 

Park 

Plymouth 

Villard, Jr. C. E 

Winona, Scan 

First 

Waseca, $10 ; C. E., $2 

Waterville 

Winthrop 

Worthington 

iTumbro Falls 

Zumbrota 



Sir 00 KANSAS— $1,487.22. 



Less expenses. 



Aitkin, First, by Rev. H. B. Bortel. . . 
Athens and Spencer Brook, Scand., 

by Rev. A. P. Engstrom 

Big Lake, Union Ch., by Rev. M. W. 

Williams 

Brainerd, Second, by Rev. M. B. Bird. 
Byron, $2.50; Freeborn, $5.20; and 

Freedom, $2.50, by Rev. W. Fisk . . 
Dawson, Y. P. S. C. E., by Mrs. N. 

Reppy, for Alaska 

Dora, West Dora Ch., by Rev. I. E. 

Pinney 

Garvin and Custer, by Rev. E. A. 

Wood 

Granite Falls and Belview, by Rev. J. 

Earl....>. 

Lamberton, by Rev. E. E. Rogers . . . 

Minneapolis, First Scand. Evan. Ch., 

by Rev. C. B. Bjuge 

Rodelmer 

Rochester. S. S. Rally, by W. J. Eaton. 
St. Paul, Park Ch., by W. B. Gerry. . 

German People's Ch., by Rev. W. 

Oehler 

Springfield, by Rev. E. C. Lyons 

Winona, Second, Rev. N. N. Stut- 
son 

Scand. by Rev. H. F. Josephson . . ,« 



IO CO 
2 50 

5 00 
14 60 

27 21 

13 2 S 
I 00 
5 OO 



21 OO 

50 OO 
25 53 



32 10 

1 23 

14 53 

2 50 
5 °° 

22 62 
5 °° 
5 °° 
5 7° 

3 5o 
155 °° 

3 75 
25 

15 00 
3 5° 
5 °° 
2 50 
2 00 



16 50 

2 00 

4 00 
80 50 
12 00 

5 36 

3 7i 
26 25 

1 CO 
IO OO 



985 30 



4 co 
1 20 



60 
J 3 33 



2 50 
14 38 



4 5° 

5 00 



5 00 
1 25 



Received by Rev. L. P. Broad 

Atwood 

Arkansas City 

Clear Creek 

A Friend 

Cora 

Dunlap >. 

Ellis, H. Raynesford 

Kansas City, Bethel 

Kirwin 

McDonald 

McPherson, A Friend 

Maize, A Friend 

Muscotah 

North Topeka 

Onaga 

Pantteg 

Russell, Y. P. S. C. E 

Topeka, Tennesseetown . . . 

Wallace 

Wellington 



Received by A C. Hogbin : 

Atchison, S.S 

Burlington 

Garnett 

Great Bend 

Newton, Ch. and S. S.... 

Olathe 

Sabetha 



Woman's H. M. Union, Miss M. E. 
Wilkinson, Treas. : 

Alton, C. E., for Alaska 

Atchison 

Blue Rapids 

Burlington 

Centralia 

Clay Center 

Cora 

Council Grove 

Emporia 

Eureka 

Ford 

Garfield 

Highland 

Independence 

Indianapolis 

Kansas City, First 

Leavenworth 

McPherson : 

Manhattan, $37.75 ; Y. P. S. C. E., 

$5 

Maplehill, Elliot Ch 

Elliott Ch., C. E 

Neosho Falls 

Olathe 

Omaga 

Osage City, C. E 

Osawatom ie 

Jr. C. E 

Ottawa 

Y. P. S. C. E., for Alaska 

Paola 

Parsons 

Y. P. S. C. E 

S.S 

Russell 

C. E., for Alaska 

Sabetha 

Seabrook 

Mrs. J. F. Drake 

Smith Center : 

St. Mary's 

Stockton 

Topeka, First 

Y. P. S. C. E 

Central Ch 



£2 60 
16 00 
11 00 

10 00 
33 6 4 

4 5° 
2 00 

5 °° 

11 CO 

4 co 
2 00 

IO OO 

20 00 

2 OO 
29 22 

5 °° 
4 00 
2 30 
2 00 

32 oc 



d8 26 



5 22 

10 00 

8 20 

13 27 

14 43 
3 93 

10 00 



^5 °5 



3 35 

20 00 
9 5° 

10 00 

21 68 
6 00 
5 °o 

10 00 
20 00 
40 00 
5 °° 
3 °° 
10 00 
2 00 
2 5° 
13 00 
50 00 
10 00 



5 °° 
11 00 

2 17 

3 42 

2 05 

14 40 

6 50 

7 50 

3 °° 
1 co 

4 4° 

5 °° 

4 95 

5 5° 

1 5° 
5 °° 

2 50 

13 °° 

15 co 
24 15 

5 00 

14 3 1 



52 



The Home Missionary 



July, 1899 



Udall $1 00 

Wabunsee 7 00 

Wellsville 500 

Westmoreland 2 50 

Wichita, Fairmount Ch 5 00 

Wellington 14 50 

Jr 10 50 

Western Park 5 00 

White Cloud 500 

516 68 
Less expenses 9 89 

5°6 79 



Bloomington, by Miss H. M. Bennay. 
Blue Rapids, S. S. Birthday offering, 

by E. M. Brice 

Brookville. by Rev. J. H. Embree 

Clay. Center. Y. P. S. C. E. of Clarence 

Eastman Memo. Ch.,by E. J. Mayos 

Comet, by Rev. J. W. Cone 

Garfield, by H. P. Wolcott 

Kansas City, Chelsea Place and Wy- 
andotte Ch's., by Rev. C. G. Mil- 
ler 

Pilgrim Ch., by Rev. D. Baines 

Griffiths 

Lawrence, Plymouth Ch., by C. L. 

Edwards 

Plymouth Ch., by S. A. Wood 

Little River, by Rev. J. A. Henrv... 
Maple Hill, St. Mary's Ch., by Rev. 

W. S. Crouch 

Milford, by C. A. Streeter 

Nickerson. by W. VV. Hamilton 

Onaga, Y. P. S. C. E., by A. O'Meara, 

Alaska 

Osawatomie, by Rev. T. S. Roberts.. 
Osborne, Ladies, by Mrs. J. R. Loom- 
is 

Ottawa, First, by A. W. Benson 

Paola, Plymouth Ch., of which $5 

from S. S.. by Rev. H. D. Leland. . 

S. S. of Plymouth Ch., add'l. by 
Prof. E. A. Farrington 

Y. P. S. C. E., by E. J. Turnbull, for 

Alaska 

Parsons, by Rev. A. W. Bishop 

Salina, Plymouth Ch., by Rev. F. D. 

Burhaus 

Smith Centre, Ch., $20; Jr. C. E., 

$6.65, by S. C. Stevens 

Sterling, by C. A. Stubbs 

Strong City, by Rev. H. E. Anderson. 
Topeka, First, by T. A. Mason 

Central Ch., by W. Lauck 

Udall, by Rev. L. P. Broad 

Wakefield, Ch., $28.33 ; Ladies' Miss. 

Soc, $s ; S. S., $7 : Y. P. S. C. E., 

for Alaska, $10, by W. Eustace 

Westmoreland, by Mrs. M. E. Hostet- 

ter 

Wichita, Fairmount Ch., by Rev. W. 

A . Bos worth 



NEBRASKA— $879.94. 

Received by H. A. Snow, Treas. : 

Alma 

Beatrice 

Ladies' Soc 

Bloomfield, Ladies' Aid Soc 

Columbus 

Creighton, Ch., $18 : S. S., «2 : La- 
dies' Soc, $5 ; Sr. Y. P. S. C. E., 

$5 

Elgin, West Cedar Valley 

Fairfield 

Fremont 

Harbine 

Harvard 

Kramer, Olive Branch 



3 
8 


45 


10 


00 


2 

9 


15 
68 


r 4 


50 


13 


5° 


136 


32 


20 


90 


10 


00 


5 
3 


70 

46 


5 


00 


9 


00 


10 


00 


S 


00 


13 


'5 


3° 


9i 


2 


00 


10 


00 


23 


15 


5 


00 


26 


65 


5 
14 


00 
62 


M4 


°5 


75 
32 


21 
89 


5=> 


33 


3 


00 


1 


00 



15 00 

39 5o 
10 50 



30 00 

5 °° 

4 10 

1 1 05 

10 00 

17 16 

3 °° 



682 


60 


20 


So 


5 


OO 



Leigh $26 00 

Linwood 19 10 

Neligh 26 00 

Omaha. First 44 50 

Plymouth 7 00 

Plymouth 1256 

Rising City 12 00 

Steelburg goo 

Ulysses 10 00 

York S 8 77 

S. S 1262 

Y. P. S. C. E 9 I4 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. C. J. 

Hall, Treas 185 50 

Omaha 5 5° 

St. Mary's Avenue 5 00 

First 76 £0 

682 90 

Less expenses 30 



Ainsworth, by Rev. H. M. Triplett. .. 

Aten, First, by Rev. W. T. Williams. 

Brunswick and Willowdale, by G. T. 
Noyce 

Chadron, by Rev. A. E. Ricker 

Crawford. First, $10.68 ; S. S.. $10.62 ; 
Senior E. S., $3-46 : Junior E. S., 33 
cents : Holiness Band, 71 cents, by 
Rev. H. V. Rominger 

Dodge, Howels and Fairview, by 
Rev. W. A. Davies 

Friend, German, Br. Green, by Rev. 

M. E. Eversz 

Y. P. S. C. E., by W. B. Payne, for 
Alaska 

Havelock, by Rev. J. E. McKenney.. 

Milford, by G. A. Munro 

Naponee, by W. Dow 

Norfolk, Second, by Mrs. C. J. Chap- 
man 

Ogalalla, by Rev. G. W. Knapp 

Omaha, Cherry Hill Ch., $5.50; and 
Saratoga Ch., $7, by Rev. L. R.. 
Hand 

Ravenna, by Rev. F. W. Pease 

Red Cloud, by Rev. F. W. Dean 

Stanton, by Rev. J. J. Klopp 

Taylor, First, by Rev. J. Poeton 

Wilcox, by Rev. O. M. Ticknor 



NORTH DAKOTA — $8,343.75, of 
which legacy, $8,250. 

Abercrombie, by Rev. W. Edwards.. 
Buxton. On account of Estate of J. P. 

Gould 

Cooperstown. $31 ; Dazey, Union Ch., 

$7.55 ; and Park School House, 

S3.45 ; by Rev. E. S. Shaw 

Eckelson. by Rev. J. R. Beebe 

Glen Uliin, by Rev. F. C. Emerson... 
Hankinson. by Rev. W. H. Girr.blett.. 
Oriska Ch., $5.10; S. S., $1.40; by 

G. S. Bascom 

Wimbledon, by Rev. J. L. Martin 



SOUTH DAKOTA— $332.71. 

Received by Rev. W. H. Thrall, Supt. 

So. Dak : 

Bowdle 

Chamberlain, W. H. M. S 

Vermillion 

W. M. S 

Y. P. S. C. E 

Yankton, S. S 



25 80 

15 00 

5° 

3 °° 

15 00 

7 °5 
3^5 

7 27 
2 50 

12 50 
2 00 

4 68 
2 50 

19 00 

16 8 S 



3 


00 


S° 


00 


42 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


33 


45 


6 

1 


5° 

So 




86 17 



July, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



53 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. F. M. 
Wilcox, Treas. : 

Academy $1000 

Alcester, S. S 1 50 

Armour 4 00 

Canova 3 50 

Clark 2 00 

Firesteel 2 20 

Lead 5 00 

Milbank, Y. P. S. C. E 1 60 

Mitchell 533 

Rapid City 4 50 

Ree Heights 2 50 

San tee 4 85 

Sioux Falls . . 10 00 

Yankton 745 



Aberdeen, Pilgrim Ch., by Rev. J. W. 

Horner ... 

Ashton and Athol, by Rev. A. Beede. 

Beulah, bv Rev. J. A. Walton 

Bowdle, by Rev. W. H. Thrall 

Brookings, S. S Goodale 

Carthage Pilgrim Ch., by Rev. E. U. 

Menzi 

Clark, by Rev. W. U. Parks 

Elk Point, by Rev. C. E. Taggart 

Faulkton, by Rev. F. Mitchell 

Ft. Pierre, by Mrs. H. C. Lyman 

Lebanon and Springs, by Rev. C. H. 

Dreisbach 

Milbank, Ch., by Rev. C. N. Fitch.. . 

Oacoma, by M. L. Howard 

Running Water, by Miss E. K. Henry 
Sioux Falls, German Emanuel Ch., 

by Rev. J. Lich 

South Shore, by Rev. P. Winter 

Turton, by G. F. Munson 

Wessington Springs, by Rev. S. F. 

Huntley 

Willow Lakes, by Rev. W. G. Carlson 
Worms, German Ch., by Rev. J. Satt- 

ler 



COLORADO— $265.04. 

Received by Rev. H. Sanderson : 

Kirk 

Colorado Springs, Second Ch... 

Cope 

Silverton 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. B. C. 

Valentine, Treas 

Denver, Plymouth C. E., for Alaska. 



64 


43 


7 


So 


8 


00 


3 


25 


16 


40 


1 


00 


10 


00 


2 


25 


4 


6l 


3 


OO 


3 


75 


1 


00 


32 


CO 


2 


CO 


6 


50 





3° 


20 


00 


I 


60 


10 


00 



40 00 
10 00 



50 00 



Boulder, by Mrs. A. M. Sawyer 13 00 

Denver, Plymouth Ch., by F. B. 

Davis 117 54 

South Broadway Ch 14 67 

Flagler, First, by Rev. C. W. Smith. . 11 00 
Fruita, Union Ch., by Rev. R. H. 

Harper 2 00 

Greeley, Park Ch. Y. P. S. C. E., by 

B. Le Kittle, for Alaska 10 00 

Highland Lake, Ch. of Christ, by Rev. 

D. A. Strong 6 00 

Lafayette, First, by Rev. G. L. Shull. 2 00 

Lyons, First, by Rev. D. F. Bright. . . 3 43 

Otis, by Rev. G. Dungan 3 50 



WYOMING— $10.50. 

Reck Springs, First, by Rev. J. H. 

Kevan 

Wheatland, by Rev. J. L. Blanks 



MONTANA-$ 2 8.8 4 . 

Woman's Missionary Union, Mrs. W. 
S. Bell, Treas.: 
Helena 

Columbus and Laurel, by Rev. J. 

Pope 

Great Falls, First, by Rev. W. N. 

Moore 

Helena, by Rev. W. S. Bell 



UTAH— $40.50. 

Lehi, by Rev. G. H. Perry 

Salt Lake City, First, by E. Merrill. . 
By Miss D. Wake, for Alaska 



IDAHO— $11.75. 

Indian Valley, by kev. G. B. Hawkes. 
Pocatello, by Rev. G. H. Perry 



Received in February by Rev. F. B 
Perkins : 

Antioch 

Cherokee 

Corralitos, Mrs. K. L. Brown, $5 
C. Bowman, $2 ; Mrs. A. Bowman 
$1 ; Mrs. A. E. Dye, §2 

Loomis, Y. P. S. C. E 

Redwood 

San Mateo 

Stockton 



6 55 
8 79 



5 00 

33 6° 

1 go 



CALIFORNIA— §5,214.02. 

Received by Rev. J. T. Ford : 

Chula Vista 25 00 

Claremont 20 30 

De Luz 4 00 

Highlands 4000 

Los Angeles, First 121 72 

Park 20 00 

Swedish 1 45 

Vernondale .... 17 go 

San Jacinto 12 50 

Sierra Madra 14 34 

Ventura 25 00 

Nathan W. Blanchard 100 00 

Villa Park 3 Co 



405 a 1 



12 


30 


5 


00 


10 


00 


7 
22 


70 

76 


45 


25 


35 


25 



138 26 



Received in March : 
Alameda, Y. P. S. C. E., $50 ; Rev. 

W. W. Scudder, $10 60 00 

Berkeley. First 160 00 

North Ch 36 00 

Bonny Doon 10 00 

Cloverdale 51 80 

Campbell 5 00 

Clayton 1 5 00 

Field's Landing 1000 

Grass Valley 25 00 

Hydesville 10 00 

Martinez 23 00 

Nevada City 13 50 

Niles 2650 

Oakland, First 22000 

Plymouth 6 35 

Market Street Ch 25 00 

Ocean View 805 

Oleander, $8.40 ; S. S., $1.73 10 13 

Oroville 21 00 

Paradise 15 00 

Petaluma 79. 10 

Rio Vista 65 70 

Rohnerville 20 00 



54 



The Home Missionary 



July, 1899 



Sebastopol $25 00 

San Francisco, Park 5 00 

Third 65 go 

Plymouth m 95 

San Mateo. C. E 3 00 

Santa Cruz 21 25 

Santa Rosa n 05 

Saratoga, of which from S. S., $1.71: 

Jr. C. E., $1 ; Sr. C. E., $5 34 46 

Soquel 400 

Tulare 18 70 

Weaverville 25 00 

J. C. Coleman, $100; W. L. Ir- 
vine, $i ; G. Mooar, $ro in 00 

Woman's Home Missionary Union : 

Alameda. Kingdom Ext. Soc 23 15 

Byron. Aid Soc 6 00 

Berkeley, First 94 30 

Grass Valley 25 00 

Morgan Hill, Mrs. Bagwill 1 00 

Niles, Miss. Soc. bal. from Ch. to 

const. Mrs. Lucy Shinn a L. M. 26 50 

Petaluma 30 00 

Oakland, First 108 00 

First, Young Ladies' Guild 80 00 

Market St 2500 

Plymouth Avenue 20 00 

East Oakland, Pilgrim Ch 33 00 

Oleander 22 68 

Pacific Grove, Kingdom Ext. Soc .. 6 75 

Redwood, Ladies' Aid Soc. . 24 51 

San Francisco, Plymouth 1695 

First 25 10 

Third 17 45 

San Jose, of which from H. M. Sons 

and Daughters, $13.40 118 co 

San Juan 7 00 

San Mateo 10 00 

Santa Cruz 69 90 

Saratoga 40 54 

Stockton 90 00 

Tipton, Miss. Soc. . 3 50 

Woodland 6 00 

Friends 2 00 

Mrs. Wright 5 co 

2,4 2 7 13 

Less expenses 27 13 



2,400 00 



Woman's H. M. Union, Southern 
California, Mrs. M. M. Smith, 

Treas $7500 

Avalon 3 29 

Y. P. S. C. E 5 71 

Bloomington 590 

Buena Park 6 70 

Chula Vista, Ladies' Aid and Miss. 

Soc 5 00 

Claremont, Ladies' Union 71 00 

Corona, Y. P. S. C. E 8 66 

Compton 1 5 00 

Escond ido 40 oo 

Etiwanda, Y. P. S. C. E 2 oo 

Highland 23 25 

Highland, Y. P. S. C. E 10 co 

S. S 7 89 

Jamul, Y. P. S. C. E 1 50 

Los Angeles. First 221 79 

S. S., of the First 2700 

Young Ladies' Miss Soc. of the 

First 15 00 

Central Ave 10 00 

East 20 96 

East S. S 1075 

Y. P. S. C. E 2 00 

West End 10 00 

Plymouth 15 00 

Mentone 6 00 

Ch id 00 

S. S . . • 400 

Moreno. Working Circle 5 00 

National City, Ladies' Aid Soc 25 00 



$2 


00 


74 


00 


28 


00 


10 


00 


3 


50 


J/5 


1 


50 


01 1 


5 


00 


25 


00 


25 


00 


130 


25 


IO 


00 


25 


00 


1 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


9 


00 


6 


11 


2 


65 


20 


00 


1,279 


9 1 



Ontario, Y. P. S. C. E 

Pasadena 

Pasadena, Young Woman's Miss. 
Soc. of the First 

S. S. of Lake Avenue 

Perris 

Pomona, Pilgrim 

Pilgrim S. S 

Mrs. L. H. Page... 

Redlands. First Ladies' Union. .. 

Young Ladies' Soc. of the First.. 

Riverside, to const. Mrs. M. C. Call 

and Mrs. D. G. Mitchell L. Ms 

Y. P. S. C. E 

San Jacinto 

Ventura, Y. P. S. C. E 

Mrs. R. J. West 

Vernon 

Vernondale 

S. S 

Villa Park, Y. P. S. C. E 

Whittier 



Alpine, $10.10 ; Dehesa, $4.Co : and 

Flinn Valley, $12 ; by Rev. J. L. 

Pearson 26 70 

Buena Park, by Rev. D. W. Mor- 
gan 10 00 

Byron, by Rev. D. Goodsell 2 50 

California, A Friend 4000 

Corona, First Ch., of which $6.34 from 

the Y. P. S. C. E., by Rev. W. N. 

Burr 41 64 

El Paso de Robles, Plymouth Ch..by 

Rev. S. D. Belt 12 10 

Fresno, by Rev. L. M. Walters 45 00 

German Ch.. by Rev. J. Legler 4 90 

Guerneville. by Rev. F. Lawson 25 00 

Los Angeles, Third Ch., by Rev. J. D. 

Habbick 25 00 

Central Avenue, by Rev. N. L. 
Rowell 14 36 

Pico Heights, S. S., by Rev. J. M. 

Schaefle 1000 

Moreno and Alessandro, by Rev. W. 

H. Wolcott sco 

Norwalk, Bethany Ch., by Rev. G. H. 

De Kay 5 00 

Ontario, First, by E. P. Dean 87 00 

Palermo, by Rev. T. F. Rayon 1 00 

Pasadena, First, by Rev. J. T. Ford, 
to const. Mrs. E. M. Walker, Mrs. 
H. D. Norton and Mrs. L. A. 
Burnham L. Ms 150 00 

North Ch., by W. H. Vedder 500 

Lake Avenue Ch., by B. Carrothers n 07 

Pomona, Pilgrim Ch., by C. M. Stone 130 00 

Riverside, First, by C. W. Derby in 55 

San Andreas and Mokelumne Hill, 

by Rev. D. Q. Travis 12 50 

San Diego, First, by M. T. Gilmore . 200 00 

Second, and La Mesna. First, by 

Rev. T. R. Earl 13 63 

San Francisco, Park Ch., by Rev. F. 

J. Wheat 4000 

Richmond Ch., by Rev. P. Coombe. 35 00 

San Juan, by Rev. S. H. Cheadle 25 00 

San Rafael. First, by Rev. W. H. 

Atkinson 8 35 

Sierra Valley, by Rev. L. Wallace.. . . 30 00 

West Saticoy, Rev. W. W. Snell ..... 1 00 



OREGON— $60.63. 

Received by Rev. M. E. Eversz, D.D., 
Supt. Germans : 
New Era, St. Peter's German Ch ... 5 60 

Portland, German, by Rev. J. Koch. 5 00 



July, i! 



The Home Missionary 



55 



Ashland, First, by Rev. E. P. Childs. 
Hood River, Riverside Ch., by Rev. 

J. L. Hershner 

Lexington, by Rev. J. M. Beauchamp. 
Portland, by Rev. D. B. Gray 

Sylvan Mission, by Rev. D. B. 
Gray 



WASHINGTON-$i 94 . 7 o. 

Aberdeen, First, by Rev. A. A. Doyle. 

Ahtanum Valley, by Rev. L. W. 
Brintnall 

Black Diamond, Pilgrim Ch.. by I. 
M. Davies 

Blaine, by Rev. W. E. Dawson 

Cathlamet, by Rev. C. W. Wells 

Columbia City, by Rev. E. P. Dada.. 

Coupeville, First, by Rev. C. E. New- 
berry. . 

Dayton, First, by Rev. M. B. Morris. 

Deer Park. Clayton, and Loon Lake, 
by Rev. F. McConnaughy 

Eagle Harbor, by Rev. J. Bushell 

Endicott, German Ch., by Rev. J. M. 
Preiss 

Everett, First, by Rev. R. B. Hassell. 



S30 



12 00 

2 16 

3 5° 



12 


00 


4 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


3 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


20 


00 



Fidalgo City, Highland Ch. and Rosa- 
rio, First, by Rev. E. D. Farns- 
worth §3 50 

Green Lake, by Rev. T. G. Lewis 7 00 

Kalama, First, by Rev. C. W. Bush- 
nell 1 no 

Kirkland, First, by Rev. O. B. Whit- 
more 1000 

Long Beach, Union Ch., by Rev. H. 
W. Mercer go 

Seattle, University Ch., $i 4 .co ; Y. P. 
S. C. E., $4.00, by Rev. Thos. C. 
Wiswell 18 00 

Spokane, Second, by Rev. W. Davies. 15 00 

Sprague, First, by Rev. P. B. Jack- 
son 16 60 

Tacoma, First, by Rev. A. J. Bailey.. 20 00 

Walla Walla, Whitman and Eells 
Memorial Ch., by F. Coyle 3 So 

March Receipts : Contributions £23,694 66 

Legacies 23,49422 

Annuity 100 00 

Interest 783 83 

Home Missionary.. 23 13 

Literature 4 81 

Permanent Fund . . . 200 00 



13 00 
5 °° 



,300 65 



APRIL, 1899 



MAINE— $37.45. 

Gorham, by J. S. Leavitt, Jr $19 00 

Limerick. E. P. Hayes 70 

Newcastle, Second, by J. P. Huston.. 15 75 

Waldoboro, Miss J. M. Bulfinch 2 00 



NEW HAMPSHIRE — $1,776.54; of 
which legacies, $1,498.75. 

Received by Hon. L. D. Stevens, 
Treas. N. H .... 160 98 

F. C. I. and H. M. Union of N. H., 
Miss A. A. McFarland, Treas : 

Concord, Silver Circle, So. Ch 5 00 

Mrs. M. W. Ninas' S. S. class in So. 

Ch 13 81 

Exeter. Mrs. E. S. Hall 36 00 

54 8e 
Francestown, Legacy of Mary C. Wil- 

lard, by G. E. Downes, Ex 200 00 

Hollis, A Friend 200 

North Hampton, Mrs. A. Gove, to 

const. H. L. Philbrook a L. M., by 

F. R. Drake 50 00 

Suncook, P. A. Mills 10 00 

Wilmot, Estate of Stephen Felch, by 

F. H. Wiggin, Trustee 1,298 75 



VERMONT- 

$550. 



.63; of which legacy, 



Royalton, Estate of Susan H. Jones, 
by J. R. Woods 

Weybridge, Y. P. S. C. E., by J. Mac- 
Murtry 



550 00 
6 63 



MASSACHUSETTS — $9,550.23 ; of 
which legacies, $8,254.81. 

Mass. Home Miss. Soc, by Rev. E. 
B. Palmer : 
By request of donors, of which for 
Alaska, $15 53000 



Auburndale, Mrs. E. Price, of which 

50 cents from Edith E. Mowery. . . 

Bernardston, Estate of Mrs. E. L. 

Burke, by J. P. Field, Ex 

Boston, Legacy of Mrs. C. M. Allen, 
by C. H. Allen, Ex 

H. Fisher, to const. Miss B. Barnard 
a L. M 

W. G. Means 

Dedham. First Ch., "The Extra Cent 

a Day Band " 

Dorchester, Second, by E. Tolman... 

East Billerica, C. E. Richardson 

Greenfield, Mrs. E. B. Loomis 

Haverhill, C. Coffin 

Holliston, Y. P. S. C. E., of the First, 

by Mrs. H. P. Dickinson 

Mittineague, by E. H. Shepard 

Norton, Trin. Cong. Ch., by S. H. 

Cobb 

Ipswich, Estate of Miss A. A. Coburn, 

by D. E. Safford, Ex 

Medford, Legacy of Mary B. Lowell, 

by W. P. Clark, Ex 

Newtonville, Central Ch., by L. E. 

Moore 

Pepperell, Ladies' Miss. Circle, by 

Mrs. A. Boynton 

Springfield, South Ch., by W. H. Mul- 

lins 

Woburn, North Ch., by Dea. S. A. 

Thomson 

Worcester, Park Ch., by Miss L. A. 
Giddings 

Estate of Mrs. M. G. Moen, by P. 
W. and S. Moen, Exs 



CONNECTICUT— $5,337.82 ; of which 
legacies, $2,883.34. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. W. W. 

Jacobs, Treas 

For Salary Fund : 
Higganum. by Miss K. E. Hunt.. 
Danbury, First, Sewing Soc, by 
Miss M. E. Stone 



»5 

2,354 


81 


300 


00 


250 
125 


CO 

bo 


31 
108 


*7 
62 


9 40 
4 7° 
4 7° 


10 


00 


25 


50 


7 


3° 


6co 


00 


500 


00 


20 


00 


10 


00 


125 


00 


15 


06 


13 


4 1 


4i5o° 


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56 



The Home Missionary- 



July, 1899 



Meriden. First, Mrs. E. Hubbard §5 00 
Hartford, So. Ch., Second Aux., 

by Miss G. M. Hills 25 00 

78 00 
Berlin, Second, $35 ; Mrs. S. Savage, 

$10, by C. S. Webster 45 co 

Bridgeport, Mrs. P. Gabriel 1 00 

Second, by O. H. Brothwell 103 50 

Bristol, First, by L. G. Merrick 60 00 

Burrville, A Friend 5 00 

Canaan, jr. C. E. Soc. of the Pilgrim 

Ch., by Mrs. S. A. Burnaby 10 00 

Central Village, by Mrs. E. H. Lilli- 

bridge 5 48 

Connecticut, A Friend 5000 

A Friend 5<x> 00 

Danbury, First, by H. E. Averill 157 70 

Derby, A Friend of the Cause 2 00 

Groton, by M. M. Baker 12 44 

Huntington, by F. H. Wells 15 00 

Madison, First, by F. A. Kelsey 10 00 

New Haven, Ch. of the Redeemer, by 

W. E. Rowland 164 95 

Grand Avenue, by D. M. Smith . . 100 00 

Young Ladies' Miss. Circle of the 

United Ch., by R. M. Munger 25 00 

Y. P. S. C. E., by R. W. Chapman, 

for Alaska 10 00 

Legacy of Sidney Pardee, by F. W. 

Pardee, Adm 175 00 

New London, Estate of J. N. Harris, 

by R. Coit. Trustee 2,708 34 

Norfolk, Y. P. S. C. E., by M. Sylver- 

nale, for Alaska 10 00 

Northfbeld, by J. P. Cathin 10 43 

Norwich. Broadway, by F .J. Leavens 1,000 00 

Park Ch , by H. L. Butts, for Alaska 10 00 

Old Saybrook, by A. S. Chesebrough 8 00 
Plainfield, First, by M. J. Kingsley.. 

Salisbury, by J. R. Harrison 5 60 

Stamford, First, by W. A. Fiske 5 00 

Stratford, S. S., by E. H. Judson. . . 10 00 
Terryville, Y. P. S. C. E., by R. E. 

Miller, for Alaska 10 00 

Thompsonville, C. Kingsbury 10 00 

West Torrington, First, by G. M. 

Whiting 12 20 



NEW YORK — $2,707.11; of which 
legacies, $128. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. J. J. 

Pearsall, Treas : 
Binghamton, First, Helpers Soc. 

to const. Mrs. E. Finney a L. M. . 5000 
Brooklyn, Central. L. B. S., lor 

Salary Fund 220 55 

Plymouth, for Salary Fund 50 00 

Bushwick Avenue, Ladies' League, 

special 5 00 

Tompkins Avenue, L. B. S no 00 

Candor, S. S 500 

L. M.G 5 00 

Elmira, Park Ch.. L. S 40 00 

Gloversville, L. B. A 20 00 

Groton, L. A. S n 00 

Hamilton 3 00 

Homer, S. S 5 70 

Honeoye 7 00 

Ithaca .. 12 00 

Special 1000 

Middletown, Ladies' Guild 5 00 

Moravia. Mrs. W. C. Tuthill. to 

const. Mrs. B. F. Barnes and Mrs. 

Isaac Butler, L. Ms 100 00 

Morristown 5 00 

New Village, for Salarv Fund 500 

New York City, Bedford Park, C. 

E. S 5 00 

Broadway Tabernacle. S. W. W.. 27 00 

Clinton Avenue, Y. L. G 85 00 

Oswego Falls, Dorcas Soc 10 00 



Poughkeepsie, S. S. 

C. E. S 

Rushville, Aux 

Sidney, S. S 

Watertown 



Albany, D. A. Thompson 

Angola, A. H. Ames 

Blooming Grove, by E. M. Hatha- 
way 

Brooklyn, Clinton Avenue, by J. Stike- 
man 

Bushwick Avenue, by T. A. Cotton 

Y. S. P. C. E.. ot Tompkins Avenue 
Ch., by E. R. Hilton, for Alaska 
Buffalo, Y. P. S. C. E., of Plymouth 

Ch., by E. C. Chatfield 

Cornwall, " Anarchist " 

Nashua, Pilgrim Ch., by P. A. Ham 

mond 

New York City. Allan Bourn 

Niagara Falls, First, by C. R. Thorne 

Northfield, by W. M. Hoyt 

Remsen, Mrs. H. J. Owen, for th 

Debt 

Saratoga Springs, S. S. of N. E. Ch., 

add'l, bv G. A. Kinsel 

Syracuse, Y. P S. C. E., of Good Will 

Ch., by J. E. Markham, for Alaska. 

Warsaw, S. S.. by H. L. Martin 

Wantagh, by G. H. Northrop 

West Bloomfield, Legacy of Myron S. 

Hall, by H. W. Hall. Ex 

Willsboro, Estate of Mrs. S. A. 

Stower, by A. J. B. Ross 



g "g NEW JERSEY— $238.00. 



$2 S 


00 


!5 


00 


5 


00 


12 


25 


5 


00 


858 


5° 




nn 


S 


00 


35 


OO 


!-353 


33 


12 


28 


3^ 


00 


5 


OO 


2 


OO 


5° 


69 


150 


00 


- 17 


18 


5 


25 



Woman's H. M. Union of the N. J. 

Assoc, Mrs. J. H. Denison. Treas. : 

Closter, " Do Something Band ". . .. 

Montclair, First, for Salary Fund. 



? 63 

10 00 

6 50 
9 75 

100 00 
28 00 



5 °° 
125 00 



East Orange. " K," for Salary Fund. 100 00 

Jersey City Heights. C. L. Ames 500 

Plainfield, by M. C. Van Arsdale, add'l. 3 00 



PENNSYLVANIA-$ 34 .88; of which 
legacy, $1 25. 

Woman's Missionary Union, Mrs. W. 
H. Clift, Treas.: 
Spring Creek 1 00 

Braddock, First, Jr. C. E. S..$i.35; 

Mrs. T. S Robjent's Primary S. S. 

Class, $2. 20. by T. Addenbrook 3 55 

Johnstown, First, by D. R. Edwards. 2 52 

Meadville, Park Avenue, by J. T. 

Stem 7 06 

Pittsburg, from Estate of Ellen P. 

Jones, by F. H. Wiggin 1 25 

S. S. of the Second Welsh, by Rev. 

W. Surdival 5 00 

Renovo, Swedish Ch., by Rev. G. O. 

Plant 4 50 

Scranton, Puritan Ch., by J. R. Davis. 10 00 



MARYLAND.— $15.00. 

Baltimore, Canton Ch., by T. 
Beadenkoff 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA-$.o.oo. 

Washington. In memory of Mrs. S. S. 
Wood, special, by Mrs. W. I. Vinal. 



July, IS 



The Home Missionary 



57 



GEORGIA— $12.66. 

Hoschton, by Rev. J. C. Forrester. . . 
North Rome, by Rev. j. W. Gilliam.. 
Sibley. $6.81, and Wallingford, $e 60, 

by Rev. G. N. Smith 

Surrency, by Rev. D. F. Steedley 



ALABAMA— $5.40. 

Dothen, Newton Chapel, Dundee, 
Echo, Zada Ch . , and Watford , Bash- 
ford Ch., by Rev. M. V. Marshall. . 

Echo, Friendship Ch., Blackwood, 
and Wicksburg, St. John's Ch., by 
Rev. W. H. Newton 

Floy. Liberty Ch., Lebanon. Liberty 
Hill Ch., and Tenbroeck. Union Hill 
Ch., by Rev. J. M. Dobbs 

Hallton, Hickory Grove Ch., and Vo- 
lina, New Hope Ch.. by Rev. I. J. 
White 

Hilton, Antioch Ch. and Rose Hill, 
New Hope Ch., by Rev. T. A. Pharr 

River Falls, New Home Ch. and Wal- 
lace, Bethel Ch.,by Rev. C. E. Bur- 
kett 



ARKANSAS- $5.00. 

Rogers, First, by Rev. R. M. Thomp- 
son 



§2 


00 


I 


00 


8 


41 


1 


25 



Irving Street, by James Reece. . . . §25 00 

First, by E. A. Reeder, for Cuba. 9 00 

Coolville, by Rev. H. O. Judd 3 50 

Cuyahoga Falls, by Miss Marion 

Clark 12 15 

Elyria, E. W. Metcalf, by L. Smith 37 50 
Fitchville, by Mrs J. H. McEl Hin- 

ney 3 00 

Lafayette, by F. E. Carlton 13 00 

Litchfield, Ch., $5 ; C. E. $5, by 

Rev. R. Chapin 1000 

Little Muskingum, by Rev. J. R. 

Nichols, D. D 5 00 

Mt. Vernon, by John F. Barber 59 96 

New Castle, Pa., by Rev. I. H. 

Jones 25 00 

New London, by Mrs. J. H. McEl- 

Hinney 14 20 

North Madison, by M. D. Skinner.. 1 00 

Oberlin, Prof. E. I. Bosworth 5 00 

Prof. A. T. Swing 10 00 

Plains, by Rev. A. L. Gridley 4 00 

Sharon, Pa,, S. S., by W. J. Thomas 3 64 

Sheffield, by Mrs. W. A. Day 2 5c 

Tallmadge, by John W. Seward 1 go 

Thomastown, Miss R. Davies.. 500 
Toledo, Birmingham, by Mrs. C. S. 

Holton 3 21 

F. Valentine 3 00 

Troedrhewdalar, by David Bevan .. 8 05 

Windham, by C. E. Smith 2830 

Youngstown, Plymouth, Dr. J. J. 

Thomas 5 00 



FLORIDA— $131.56. 

Received by Rev. S. F. Gale. Supt. : 
Key West, Anniversary of Fla. H. 

M. Soc 

A Friend 

Haines City, United Ch. of Christ, 
by Rev. S. J. Townsend 

Jacksonville, Union Ch., by F. H. 
Race . . 

Lake Helen, by Rev. M. Noble 

Ormond, by Rev. D. M. Brecken- 
ridge 

Winter Park, by P. Dale 



TEXAS— $10.00. 

Paris, First Ch., $7-50; Ladies' Soc. 
$2.50 ; by Rev. L. Rees 



OKLAHOMA— $10.22. 

Park and Bulah, by Rev. J. F. Rob- 

berts 

Perkins, Rev. L. B. Parker 

Soldier Creek, by Rev. H. B. Brown. . 



OHIO— $1,055.94. 

Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser, D.D.: 

Brighton, by O. F. Goss 

Canal Dover, Welsh Union Ch., W. 

Roberts 

Ceredo, West Va., by Rev G. Gads- 

by 

Cincinnati, Walnut Hills, by E. J. 

Wood : 

Cleveland, First S. S., by F. V. 

Anderson 

Pilgrim, by H. C. Holt 

For Bohemian Work 



23 00 
10 90 



1 30 

7 00 

24 70 

5 97 
60 00 
go 00 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. G. B. 
Brown, Treas. : 

Cleveland, Euclid Avenue 800 

Dayton .... 5 00 

Lock 2 00 

Lyme ... 5 50 

Marietta, First 9 00 

Putnam, C. E 2 co 

Medina, C. E 500 

Mt. Vernon 345 

Oberlin, First, L. A. S 31 45 

Of which $10, from Dime 
Banks, Grace Prince and 

M. Richards it 22 

First. Jr. C. E., $3.48 ; " two 

little girls," 15 cts 363 

Ridgeville Corners, H. Hand F. 

M.S 1 60 

S. S 3 06 

Toledo, Second 1 00 

Wakeman 7 00 

Wellington 7 00 

Weymouth, Jr. C. E 125 

Williamsfield 300 

York, C. E 2 50 

112 66 

Special gifts to meet the debt of 1898, 

1899 in April 434 30 

Wellington. In memory of Mrs. M. R. 

Hamlin, by H. B. Hamlin 10 00 

Youngstown, Plymouth, by J. J. 

Thomas, M.D., for Cuba 10 00 



INDIANA-$ 77 .25. 

Woman's H. M. Union, by Mrs. W. A. 
Bell : 

Angola 

Alexandria 

Dunkirk, Willing Workers 

Elkhart . . 

Indianapolis, Pilgrim 

Portland 



5 00 
7 75 
5 00 
28 50 
1 00 
4 00 



51 25 



58 



The Home Missionary 



July, II 



Angola, by Rev. E. S. Smith 

East Chicago, First, by W. R. Dia- 
mond 

Indianapolis, Trinity Ch., by Rev. L. 
White 



ILLINOIS— $251.00 ; of which legacy, 

$250.00. 

Griggsville, Estate of Ebcnezer Ba- 

zin. by T. Turnbull, Ex 

Rockford, E. S. Bushnell 



!j'7 00 



MISSOURI— $382.80. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. K. L. 
Mills, Treas. : 

Aurora 225 

Cameron 1000 

Hamilton 2000 

Hannibal, Pilgrim 1 30 

Kansas City, First no 00 

Clyde 8750 

Beacon Hill 12 50 

Olivet 5 00 

Ivanhoe Park .'. 8 41 

Primary S. S., $1.02 ; Jr. C. E. S., 

$1.81 2 83 

Lebanon 21 92 

Mead ville 975 

Neosho 5 90 

St. Joseph 20 82 

St. Louis, Memorial 287 

Pilgrim 50 00 

Fountain Park 10 00 

381 05 

Less expenses 19 05 

362 00 

Amity, by Rev. B. F. Logan 3 80 

St. Louis, Hope Ch., by Rev. A. L. 

Shear 17 oo 



MICHIGAN— $44.00; of which legacy, 



$37.00. 

Benzonia. Estate cf Amasa Waters. 

Detroit, Rev. A. Huelster 

A Friend 



WISCONSIN— $38.00. 

Apollonia, $4 ; Bruce, $4, by Rev. I. 

Jones ... 

Park Falls, $26.50; and Butternut. 

$3.50, by Rev. E. L. Morse 



37 °° 
2 00 

5 °° 



8 00 
30 00 



Pillsbury, by Rev. J. M. Soderstrom. 
Sauk Rapids and St. Cloud, Swedish 

Ch's, by Rev. J. Rood 

Silver Lake, Y. P. S. C. E., by A. 

Trutna 

Spring Valley, by Mrs. M. J. Hunt... 
Winona, Estate of G. F. Hubbard.... 



KANSAS-$ 3 8. 53 . 

Received by Rev. L. P. Broad : 
Bala 

Woman's H. M. Union, Miss M. E. 
Wilkinson, Treas. : 
Maple Hill, Eliot Ch. C. E 

Netawaka, by Rev. F. G. Mitchell . . . 

Paola, Plymouth Ch.. $250; S. S., 
5cc., by H. D. Leland 

Plevna, by Rev. M. W. Woods 

Wichita, Plymouth Ch., by E. G. Rob- 
ertson 

NEBRASKA-$8 3 .6 3 . 

Butte, First, by Rev. J. Gray 

Crete. German Ch., by Rev. J. Eger- 

land 

Hastings, German Ch., by Rev. C. 

W. Wuerrschmidt 

Inland, by D. Stimbert 

Palisade and Eureka, by Rev. J. H. 

Beitel 

Petersburg, by Rev. J. Roberts 

Santee Agency, Pilgrim Ch., by F. B. 

Riggs 

Sutton, $6.60; Stockham, J'2.40, by 

Rev. G. Essig 

Syracuse, by Miss M. L. Zellers 



NORTH DAKOTA-$86.66. 

Received by Rev. J. L. Maile, Supt. 
By Mrs. Mary M. Fisher, Treas. : 

Caledonia, Miss, and Aid Soc 

Dexter, S. S 

Dwight, Ladies' Miss. Soc 

Fargo, First, Ladies' Miss. Soc. 

Ladies' Soc. Easter Offering. . . 

Plymouth, Ladies' Soc 

Grand Forks, Ladies' Miss. Soc. 
Lidgerwood, Ladies' Miss. Soc. 

Mayville, Ladies' Miss. Soc 

Portland, Christian End. Soc... 
Wahpeton, Ladies' Miss. Soc. . . . 

Crary, Ch., by Mrs. Culver ..'. 



52 


Of 1 


2 


50 


7 

15 

500 


00' 
So 
03 



I 


00 


4 


5° 


3 


00 


10 


50 



16 53 

1 50 
5 00 

8 00 
4 15 



9 00 
4 71 



3 


CO 


1 


70 


5 


00 


9 


00 


23 


50 


4 


So 


1 


66 


3 


3° 


5 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


7i 


66 


IS 


00 



IOWA-$ 4 .2i. 

Boonsboro, Miss S. W. Thayer 

Slater, S. S. Rally, by Rev. B. C. Zit- 
litt 



3 21 



MINNESOTA-$ 7 o2. 7 i ; of which leg- 
acy, $500.00. 

Edgerton, First, by Rev. P. H. Fisk. . 3 08 
Glencoe, " Bohemian Congregation," 

by Rev. P. Reitinger 2000 

Bohemian, by Rev. P. Reitinger... 10 00 

Hasty, by Rev. A. E. Barnes 500 

Mcintosh, First, by Miss M. Darling. 1 o:> 
Minneapolis, Park Avenue, by O. B. 

King 11 33 

Miss L. D. Lyman, $25 ; F. W. Ly- 
man, $100 125 00 



SOUTH DAKOTA-$ii3. 45 . 

Received by Rev. W. H. Thrall, Supt., 
'' Friends of S. Dak." 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. F. M. 
Wilcox, Treas. : 

Huron 

Letcher 

Academy and Kirkwood, by Rev. L. 

E. Camfield 

Bowdle, by Rev. W. Radford 

Custer, by Mrs. K. W. Radfo'd 

Faulkton, by Rev. F. Mitchell 

Highmore, by Rev. D. L. Thomas 

Plankinton, Rev. J. Davies 



19 


IO 


2 


00 


21 


10 


2 


5° 


7 


5° 


11 


40 


5 


00 


4 


20 


5 


00 



July, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



59 



MONTANA-$ 33 .Q5- 

Woman's Miss. Union, Mrs. W. S. 
Bell, Treas. : 
Helena, Y. P. S. C. E 

Helena, by Rev. W. S Bell 

Livingston, Halbrook, by E. H. Tal- 
cott 



UTAH-$2 5 .oo. 

Bountiful, by Rev. D. Peebles 

Park City, First, by Rev. B. M. 
Hogen 



COLORADO— $190.78 ; of which leg- 
acy, $82.12. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. B. C. 

Valentine, Treas 

Denver, Plymouth C. E. Soc 

Villa Park, Thank Offering 

Cripple Creek, First, by Rev. G. W. 

Ray 

Greeley, Legacy of C. S. Merrill, by 

Garrigues and Smith 

Manitou , by Rev. F. L. Hayes 

Rico, People's Ch., by Rev. G. A. 

Chatfield 

Starkville, by Rev. J. F. Smith 



CALIFORNIA— $1,143.67. 

Received by Rev. J. T. Ford : 

Los Angeles, First, Jr. C. E. 

Bethlehem, W. M. S 



Received by Rev. F. B. Perkins : 
Collections 



Adin, Providence and Station Hill, by 

Rev. H. Perks $5 85 

Elk River Island, by Rev. G. A. 

Jasper 24 00 

§7 75 Kenwood, $22.50; and Glen Ellen, 

$15.00, by Rev. A. J. Scctt 37 5° 

1 85 Lorin, by Rev. S. G. Arnett 16 05 

Oakland, Second Ch., by Rev. J. W. 

24 35 Philips 17 10 

Pacific Grove, Mayflower Ch., by Rev. 

O. W. Lucas 20 50 

Pescadero, by Rev. E. Hoskins 10 75 

Pomona, Pilgrim, by CM. Stone 268 77 

Porterville, by Rev. J. A. Milligan... 16 75 

5°o Rocklin, by Rev. W. C. Day 1455 

San Luis Obispo, by Miss K. F. Whit- 

20 °° mer L 2 85 

Scotia, Rio Dell and Pepperwood, by 
Rev. W. Gordon 12 00 

OREGON-$25.2 7 . 

22 ss Woman's H. M. Union, by Mrs. C. F. 

,- oo Clapp, Treas.: 
22 45 For Alaska 4 50 

50 00 Forest Grove, by Rev. C. F. Clapp.. . 20 77 

27 00 WASHINGTON-$ 5 6.i2. 

g2 I2 Eureka, by Rev. A. R. Olds 2 20 

T _ c . New Whatcom, Tabernacle Ch., by 

755 Dr. C. S. Teel 842 

. „. Olympia, First, by Rev.W. A.Remele. 1000 
Z gg Seattle, Y. P. S. C. E. of Plymouth 
Ch., by Miss J. Holbrook, for 

Alaska 10 co 

Taylor Ch., by Rev. G. H. Lee 13 50 

Spokane, Pilgrim Ch., by Rev. J. Ed- 
wards 10 00 

Tolt, by Rev. G. Kindred 2 00 

5 00 

1000 April Receipts : Contributions $10,606 20 

Legacies 14,18527 

15 00 Interest 432 50 

Home M issionary 25 05 

682 00 $25,249 02 



MAY, 1899 



MAINE— $120.73. 

Bluehill, Ladies' Mission Circle, by 

C. J. Lord $200 

Harrison, $2.66 ; North Bridgton, $3, 

by Rev. A. G. Fitz 5 66 

Portland, A Friend 1 00 

Warren, by J. Graham 108 45 

West Brooksville, Rev. J. S. Richards. 3 62 



NEW HAMPSHIRE-$39.o 9 . 

F. C. I. and H. M. U. of N. H., Miss 
A. A. McFarland. Treas.: 

Concord. First. Y. P. S. C. E 

Salmon Falls, Y. P. S. C. E 



Concord, A Friend 

Manchester, Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Hale. 
Peterboro, Union Ch., by F. A. Tar- 
bell 



5 °° 
10 00 



VERMONT-$ 4 o2.29. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. R. P. 

Fairbanks, Treas. : 

Barre, Ladies' Union 

Burlington, College St. Ch. S. S. for 

Salary Fund 

Chelsea, Y. P. S. C. E., for Salary 

Fund 

Clarendon, Y. P. S. C. E , for Salary 

Fund 

Cornwall 

Fair Haven 

Ferrisburg, S. S., $1 ; Y. P. S. C. E., 

$2, for Salary Fund 

Hero, South 

Jamaica 

Jeffersonville 

Manchester 

Montpelier 

Newburg 

Northfield, Y. P. S. C. E., for Salary- 
Fund 

Richmond, Y. P. S.C. E., for Salary 

Fund 



I 


00 


s 


00 


6 


3° 


3 


CO 


S 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


IS 


00 


20 


00 


10 


00 



6o 



The Home Missionary 



July, 1899 



Rochester, Y. P. S. C. E., for Salary 

Fund 

Royalton, Y. P. S. C. E., for Salary 

Fund 

Rupert, Y. P. S. C. E., for Salary 

Fund 

Rutland, for Salary Fund 

St. Johnsbury, North Ch., for Cu- 
bans 

South Ch 

Y. P. S. C. E., for Salary Fund. 

Stovve 

Swanton 

Vergennes 

Y. P. S. C. E., for Salary Fund... 
Waitsfield, Home Circle, tor Salary 

Fund 

Waterville, for Salary Fund 

Wells River, for Salary Fund 

Whiting, Y. P. S. C. E., for Salary 

Fund 

Windham, Y. P. S. C. E 

Wi ndsor 

Woodstock 



For Salary Fund : 
Berkshire East, Y. P. S. C. E.... 

Brattleboro, Y. P. S.C. E 

Chelsea, Y. P. S. C. E 

Craftsbury, North, Y. P. S. C. E. 

Glover West, S. S 

Greensboro, S. S 

Middlebury, S. S 

Montpelier, S. S 

Orwell, Y. P. S. C. E 

Peru, Y. P. S. C. E 

Rutland West, Y. P. S. C. E 

St. Johnsbury, North Ch., Y. P. 

S. C. E 

East, Y. P. S. C. E 

Stowe, Y. P. S. C. E 

Wolcott, Y. P. S. C. E 

Woodstock, Y. P. S.C. E 



Si 65 



s 


00 


25 


00 


10 


CO 


25 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


5 


40 


5 


00 


10 


1 


5 


25 


3 


00 


5 


00 


21 


60 


282 


77 


5 


00 


5 


CO 


1 


00 


2 


00 


5 


00 


1 


50 


5 


00 


10 


CO 


8 


50 


1 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


2 


CO 


4 


78 


3 


00 


5 


00 



68 78 



35i 55 

Manchester, E. T. Kellogg 5 00 

Peacham, Y. P. S. C. E., by P. Blanch- 

ard, for Alaska 1000 

St. Johnsbury East, Third, by W. A. 

Graham 2 24 

Springfield, by B. F. Aldrich 29 00 

Williamstown, by G. Beckwith 4 50 



MASSACHUSETTS — $3,516.49; of 
which legacies, $179.13. 

Mass. Home Miss. Soc, Rev. E. B. 

Palmer, Treas 2,00000 

By request of donors 280 18 

Woman's H. M. Asso., Miss L. D. 
White, Treas : 
For Salary Fund 16c 00 

Andover, South Ch.. by J. Alden 25 00 

Boston. Estate of Rev' E. K. Aiden, 

D.D., by E. K. Alden, Ex 119 13 

W. A. Wilde, for Salary Fund 25 00 

A Friend 700 

Charlestown, First, by G. Rates 39 85 

Dedham, First Ch.. Two Cent a Week 
Band of the Y. P. S. C. F., by Miss 

M. C. Burgess 1000 

Florence, bv G. H. Ray 1993 

V. P. S. C. E., by E. M. Rice, for 

Alaska. 12 00 

Hatfield, by F. H. Bard well 4434 

Y. P. S. C. E , for Alaska, by Miss 

E. H. Billings 1000 



Haverhill, Center Ch., by D. Hackett. §120 
Holyoke, Second, of which for debt 

$125, by J. N. Hubbard 152 

Leicester, Estate of Mrs. M. W. Lamb, 

by H. A. White, Ex 60 

Lenox. A Friend 1 00 

Monson, G. E. Fuller, M. D 10 00 

Monterey, S. S.. by Miss J. A. Town- 
send 1 80 

Northampton, " W." 300 00 

South Deerfield, Ch., $42 ; S. S., $5, by 

C. B. Tilton 4700 

Springfield, Park Ch., by W. P. Un- 
derwood 45 6° 

Wellesley, A Friend 25 00 

[Erratum ; Northampton, Legacy of 
Francis Edwards, by W. I. Edwards. 
$500, should be Westhampton. Er- 
roneously ack. in April Home Mis- 
sionary under February receipts.] 

RHODE ISLAND— $10.00. 

Providence, Y. P. S. C. E., of Benefi- 
cent Ch., by Miss E. W. Olney, for 
Alaska 10 



CONNECTICUT -$2,006.00; of which 

legacy, $150.00. 

Miss. Soc. of Conn., W. W. Jacobs, 
Treas 80 85 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. W. W. 

Jacobs. Treas 31 50 

For Salary Fund : 
Greenfield Hill, by Miss M. C. 

Meeker, for Salary Fund 25 00 

Hartford, South Ch., Second Aux., 

by Miss G. M. Hills 13300 

Kent, Y. P. S. C. E., by Miss M. 

A. Hopson, for Alaska ' 10 00 

Kensington, Mrs. S. A. Hart, by 

Mrs. N. F. Taylor 25 00 

Meriden, First, by Miss S. E. 

Collins 8 00 

Milford, Plymouth, L. M. Soc, by 

Miss K. S. Tibbals 16 00 

Mystic, by Miss M. J. Dickinson.. 5 00 

New Britain, South Ch., Friend in 

H. M. Soc 1 70 

Thank offering. L. H. M. S 4860 

New Milford, L. H. M. U., by Miss 

B. Hine 3800 

For Salary Fund 125 

Newington, Eunoean Soc. by 

Mrs. F. C. Latimer, for Alaska. 27 00 

No. Guilford, Second, L. A. S., by 

Miss R. D.Chittenden 100 

Poquonock, Aux., by Mrs. N. M. 

Case.. 1800 

Somerville, by Mrs. C. E. Stowe. 18 25 

South Canaan, Aux , by Mrs. C. 

E. Manley 250 

Stratford, H. M. Sew. Soc, by 

Mrs. R. W. Bunnell 1803 

Woodstock, by Miss F. H. Butler. 25 00 

452 80 

Bethel, A Friend 5 00 

Bridgeport, A Friend in the South 

Ch 500 

Branford, S. S. of the First, by W. H. 

Hoadley, for Cuba 50 00 

Derby, Second, by J. Eiven 21 50 

Greens Farms, by G. P. Jennings 24 80 

Hartford, Asylum Hill Ch., A Friend, 

by C. E. Thompson 2 00 

Hartford Theol. Sent. Students, Y. 
M. C. A., by B. E. Marsh 2890 



July, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



61 



Home Dept. of Center Ch. S. S., by 

K. Smith $15 00 

Mrs. M. H. Pratt 1 00 

Huntington, by F. H. Wells 10 00 

Lebanon, A Friend 10 00 

Middletown, Y. P. S. C. E. of the 
First, by Rev. A. W. Hazen, for 

Alaska 10 00 

Mrs. J. Bunce and Mrs. A. T. 

Hazen, special 10 00 

Milford, Plymouth Ch., by A. A. 

Baldwin 259° 

Plymouth Ch., B. B.^ by S. Hawk- 
ins 16 37 

Mystic, S. S., by C. W. Foote 4 00 

New Britain, L. J. Pease 25 00 

New Haven, United Ch., by C. E. P. 

Sanf ord 573 00 

Students and Faculty of Yale Div. 

School, by G. M. Butler 100 00 

Norfolk, by S. A. Seldon 25247 

Norwich, " E. G. R " 50 00 

Rockville, Y. P. S. C. E. of Union 

Ch., by H. L. James, for Alaska ... 4 00 

Salisbury, W. B. H. M., by Mrs. L. 

Warner 10 00 

Sherman, by M. G. Gelston 31 80 

West Hartford, Estate of Nancy S. 

Gaylord, by F. H. Parker, Ex 150 00 

Westport, Saugatuck S. S., by H. C. 

Woodworth 421 

West Winsted, Second, by J. Hins- 
dale 2 00 

Willimantic, by A. C. Everest 28 40 



1.94, of which leg 



NEW YORK- 
acy, $500. 



Received by N. Y. H. M. Soc, Wm. 

Spalding, Treas., Collections in 

April, 1899 : 

Albany, First 

Ashville, S. S. and C. E. S 

Barry ville 

Bay Shore 

Binghamton, Plymouth 

Mrs. Edward Taylor 

Blooming Grove ". 

Bridgewater 

Bristol 

Buffalo, Fitch Mem'l 

Plymouth Mission 

Brooklyn, Immanuel 

Lewis Ave 

Burrville 

Camden Ch., $30 ; S.S.,$5 

Chenango Forks 

Columbuc 

Cortland 

Deansboro 

Deer River 

De Ruyter 

Eldred 

Elmira, St. Luke's 

Franklin 

Gasport 

Glen Spey 

Grand Island 

Griffin's Mills 

Hamilton 

Honeoye 

Kiantone, C. E. S 

Lake View 

Lakewood 

Lebanon 

Lincklaen 

Lisbon Center 

Lockport, First 

Mannsville 

Massena, Ch., $10; "A Friend," 



Middletown, First. 
Moira 



102 10 

2 50 

3 50 
3 °° 

11 16 
10 00 
8 70 
5 12 
10 00 
1 00 

1 53 

8 76 
14 So 

1 5° 
35 °° 

5 45 

7 58 

25 OO 

8 75 
3 36 



3 25 
52 65 

3 20 

1 50 

4 13 

2 00 
12 50 
17 00 

1 00 



11 00 
70 67 
4 25 



New Haven, C. E.S 

Newburg , 

New Village, W. M. S 

New York, Camp Mem'l .... 

Mt. Hope 

North Collins 

North Evans 

North Java 

Norwood 

North, S. S 

Trinity 

Otto 

Oswego 

Oxford.... 

Paris 

Phoenix 

Portland, C. E. S 

Plainfield Center 

Prospect 

Randolph, Ch., $25 ; C. E. S. 

W.H. M. S 

Riga 

Rochester, Plymouth 

South . 

'Roscoe 

Salamanca 

Savannah 

Schenectady 

Schroon Lake 

Sloan 

Spencerport, W. M. S 

Syracuse, South Ave 

Tallman , 

Tannersville 

Utica, Plymouth 

Woodville 



Woman's Home Missionary Union, by 
Mrs. J. J. Pearsall, Treas. Con- 
tributions in April, 1890 : 

Albany, First, L. H. M. S 

Aquebogue, Aux 

Brooklyn, Ch. of Pilgrims, W. H. 

M. S 

Bush wick Ave., L. S 

Cortland, L. M. S 

Greene, M. H 

Howells Depot, Aux 

Java Village, M. S 

Lockport, First. W. H. M. S 

Lysander, W. M. S 

Millville, W. M. S 

Northville, W. M. S 

Norwich, King's Daughters 

Norwood, Aux 

Ogdensburg, W. H. M. S 

Poughkeepsie, L. H. M. S 

Pulaski, L. M. S 

Riverhead, Mrs. J. H.Tuthill 

Rochester. South, H. M. S 

Sayville, W. H. M. S 

Schenectady, L. M. S 

Seneca Falls. H. M. S 

Sidney, W. H. M. S 

Syracuse, Danforth. L. M. S 

Good Will Work Soc 

Plymouth. W. G 

Bible School 

Utica, Bethesda, W. M. S 

Plymouth, W. M. S 

West Bloomfield, Aux 

Wellsville, Aux., $1; C. E. S., 



$8 


25 


12 


40 


5 


00 


6 


01 


10 


00 


7 


53 


3 


01 


7 


79 


10 


00 


10 


00 


5 


23 


2 


CO 


28 


4" 


19 


64 


8 


.5° 


22 


61 


3 


80 


1 


95 


1 


84 


31 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


4 


98 


42 


50 


13 


.52 


3 


65 


3 


00 


3 


75 


3 


40 


3 


30 


6 


09 


2 


34 


3 


5o 


2 


00 


10 


00 


11 


27 



$12.54 

West Newark, M.S.. 
West Croton, C. E. S 
Willsboro, Aux 



802 29 



116 32 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. J. J. 

Pearsall, Treas 

New York City, Broadway Taber- 
nacle Soc 



25 


00 


5 


00 


25 


CO 


19 


20 


5 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


3° 


00 


4 


08 


14 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


25 


00 


20 


00 


25 


00 


5" 


00 


12 


00 


6 


75 


25 


00 


10 


00 


20 


00 


10 


00 


26 


00 


113 


00 


20 


84 


10 


00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


13 


54 


7 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


712 


73 


9 1 


98 


10 


00 



62 



The Home Missionary 



July, 189901. 



50 


00 


50 


00 


10 


00 


25 


00 


17 


IQ 


7 


5« 


1 


5° 


2 


5° 


15 


00 



5 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


5<*> 


00 


18 


00 


5 


00 



25 


00 


35 


00 


10 


00 


200 


00 


21 


76 


13 

1 


37 

23 


4 


00 


1 


00 



Brooklyn. Tompkins Ave. L. B. S., 

for Salary Fund $15 00 

Lewis Avenue Earnest Workers, 
to const. J. B. Warner a L. M. 

Clinton Avenue L. B. S 

West Groton C. E. S., for Alaska... 

Syracuse, Danf orth Ch 

Ithaca 

Antwerp, C. E. S 

West Groton, Jr. C. E 

Brooklyn, Mrs. Foote :. 

Buffalo, First, W. G 



Brooklyn, Beecher Memorial, by Rev. 

D. B. Pratt 7 64 

Beecher Memorial, Y. P. S. C. E., 

by Rev. D. B. Pratt 

Y. P. S. C. E. of theCh. of the Pil- 
grims, by Mrs. J. H. Prentice 

A Friend, by Mrs. E. Balkeley, 

special 

Canandaigua, Legacv of Antoinette 

Pierson, by C. A. Richardson, Ex.. 

Elizabethtown, First, by Rev. J. K. 

Moore 

Malone, F. M . Eames 

Mount Sinai, by S. H. Miller 

Napoli, First, $5-95; S. S. $2.05, by N. 

A. Bliss 

New York City. Broadway Taber- 
nacle S. S.. by E. C. Warren 

Bethany S. S. Broadway Tabernacle 

Mission, by F. M. Robinson 

Trinity Ch., by R. Turner 

A Friend 

A Friend 

A Friend 

A Friend 

A Friend 

Troy, A Friend 

Ulster Park, Union Center, by W. H. 
Hopkins 



NEW JERSEY-$t 49 .68. 

Woman's H. M. Union of the N. J. 

Assoc, Mrs. J. H. Denison, 

Treas. : 
Montclair, First, for Salary Fund.. 
Plainfield 



Paterson, Auburn Street Ch., by J. 
Chase 



PENNSYLVANIA-$6g. 5 n. 

Woman's Missionary Union, Mrs. W. 
H. Clift, Treas. : 

Braddock 

Ridgeway 

Arnot, Swedish Ch., by Rev. C. J. 

Wideberg 

Kane, Ch.. $23 : S. S.. $20 : Jr. C. E , 

$2; Woman's Miss. Soc. $10. by W. 

H. Davis, to const. J. D. Magowan 

aL. M 

Plymouth, Elm Ch., by Rev. T. 

McKay 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA -$58.00. 

Woman's H. M. Union of the N. J. 
Asso., Mrs. J. H. Denison. Treas.: 
Washington, D. C., for Salary Fund 58 00 



i 2 43 
3 50 
2 76 



125 00 
8 08 


133 °8 


16 60 



2 


58 


5 


i >< . 


7 


58 


1 


76 


55 


. 10 


5 


25 



50 

35 

1 25 

3 00 

4 oo |T 
5° 

2 00 
1 00 

25 



GEORGIA— $15.44. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Miss M. L. 

Turner, Treas 

Columbus, by Rev. Geo. W. Cumbus. 

By Rev. L. J. Biggers 

Five Forks, by Rev. T.J. Burden 

Fort Valley, by Rev. J. F. Blackburn 
Lovejoy, by Rev. J. H. Nash 



ALABAMA-$i2.8 5 . 

Ashland, Christian Home Ch. and 

Millerville Bethel Ch., by Rev. T. 

Wright 

Clanton, Mountain Spring Ch., by 

Rev. J. L. Busby 

Clanton and Kingston, by Rev. C. A. 

Milstead . . .". 

Edwardsville, Salem Ch. and Oxford, 

Union Grove Ch., by Rev. G. W. 

Vaughan 

Good Hope, Texas Union Ch., Kent, 

Mt. Olive Ch. and Tallassee, 

Liberty Ch., by Rev. A. C. Wells 
Haleyville, Union Grove Ch., by Rev. 

G. W. Rowe 

Millville, Oak Hill Ch., by Rev. H. 

T. McKay 

Milner. Union Hill Ch., by Rev. F. 

M. Rice 

Verbena, Shady Grove Ch., by Rev. 

W. C. Culver 



LOUISIANA-$2. 5 o. 

New Orleans, University Ch., by E. 
C. Little 



FLORIDA— $177.39. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. W. D. 
Brown, Treas. : 
Special for Ybor City Mission, 

Tampa. 

Haines City, Y. P. S. C. E 100 

Aux 2 00 

Lake Worth. Y. P. S. C. E 400 

Melbourne, Y. P. S. C. E 100 

St. Petersburgh. Aux 2 98 

Tavares, Y. P. S. C. E 4 04 

Ybor City, Aux 1 08 

Colls, taken at East Coast Conf. : 

Daytona.. 1000 

Interlachen 6 00 

Jacksonville, Aux 1 93 

Lake Helen, Aux 17 75 

S. S 20Q 

Magdalene, Y. P. S. C. E 126 

Mannfield, Aux 1 10 

New Smyrna 472 

Oakdale. Conn 5 00 

Orange City, Aux 360 

Pomona, Aux 1 00 

Tampa, Jr. Y. P. S. C. E 150 

Tangerene, Aux 5 65 

Tavares. Aux 5 80 

Jr. Y. P. S. C. E 3 22 

Tryon, N. C, Ladies' Miss. Soc. 2 50 

Winter Park, Y. P. S. C. E 5 00 

Ybor City, Aux 19 28 

"3 5° 
Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. W. D. 
Brown, Treas.: 

Daytona 10 00 

Cerro Gorda, Union Ch., by Rev. D. 

C. Stewart 2 00 

Cocoanut Grove and Miami, Union 

Ch's., by Rev. J. Bolton 3 00 



jly, ii 



The Home Missionary 



63 



Cottondale, County Line Ch., by Rev. 
S. B. Judah 

Interlachen, by Rev. W. D. Brown. . . 

Ormond, Y. P. S. C. E., by M. M. 
Watson 

Potolo, Carmel Ch. and Wausau, Har- 
mony Ch., by Rev. E. A. Buttram.. 

Tampa, by Rev. E. P. Herrick 

Westville, First, Bonifay and Vernon, 
First, by Rev. P. G. Woodruff 



§0 

6 


So 


10 


00 


3 
2 


00 
3i 



26 58 



Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser, D.D. 
Treas. : 

Bohemian Board 

Cleveland, Euclid Avenue 

Hudson, A Friend 

Nelson, A Friend 

Oberlin, Estate of Henry Cowles. . . . 



J20 OO 
14 36 



34 36 

7 60 

1 00 

43 80 



•KLAHOMA— $3.07. 

Downs, Central Ch., by Rev. J. D. 

Howell 

North Enid, First, by Rev. A. N. Lef- 

fingwell 



[EW MEXICO— $10.00. 
" New Mexico " ,. 



ENNESSEE— $5.00. 

Knoxville, Pilgrim Ch., by Rev. J. 
H. Frazee 



HIO— $544.16, of which legacy, $43.80. 

Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser, D.D. : 
Ashtabula, Swedish, by Rev. C. A. 

Widing 

Atwater. by G. W. Weldy 

Aurora, by Rev. J. H. McKee 

Bristolville, by Capt. C. P. Lyman. 

Cleveland, First, S. S., by F. V. 

Anderson 

Euclid Avenue, by J. Snow 

L. V. Dennis, special 

Franklin Avenue, by Mrs. W. 

Westgate 

Columbus, Eastwood, by A. S. 
Heatig 

South, by Rev. J. W. Barnett. . . . 

•Elyria, First, by G. H. Ely 

Marietta, W, W. Mills, special 

North Monroeville, by Mrs. H. S. 

Cornell 

Painesville, First, by Rev. A. F. 

Skeele 

Springfield, First, by H. L. Sawver 
Wellington, S. S., by J. H. Rust... 
Weymouth. Y. P. S. C. E., by Mrs. 

F. S. Worden 

Windham, Rev. C. E. Dickinson, 

D.D 

Special gifts to meet the debt of 

1898-99, in May 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. G. B. 
Brown, Treas. : 

Bellevue 

Cleveland, First 

Franklin Avenue 

Oberlin, Second, L. S. Salary 
Fund and to const. Rev. H. M. 

Tenney, D.D. a L.M 

Toledo. Washington Street, W. 

M.U 

Sunshine Band 

Jr. C. E.... 

Birmingham, L. A. S 

Primary Dept., S. S 



Less for Bohemian work 



1 50 
1 57 



2 


00 


5 


So 


12 


00 


3 


00 


9 


OS 


11 


°4 


10 


00 


10 


86 


20 


00 


4 


00 


150 


00 


25 


00 


5 


40 


24 


68 


5 


00 


3 


79 


3 


00 


10 


00 


83 


08 



3 00 
10 50 

2 50 



I 


CO 


I 


00 


80 


00 


20 


00 



INDIANA-$6 7 . 3 o. 

Woman's H. M. Union, by Mrs. W. A. 
Bell : 

Indianapolis, Mayflower 

S. S 

Sr. C. E 

Jr. C. E 

Trinity 

Lake Gage 

Orland 



ILLINOIS— $21.00. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Miss B. E. 
Crosby, Treas. : 
Geneseo 



Strawn, by Mrs. H. C. List. 



MISSOURI- 



.96. 



Carthage, S. S. of the First, by L. N. 

Manley 

Chillicothe, Union Ch., by Rev. J. P. 

Field 

St. Louis, Jr. C. E. of Memorial Ch., 

by Mrs. A. F. Foster 



MICHIGAN— Legacy, $100.00. 

Romeo, Legacy of Amelia T. An- 
drews, by G. Griggs, Ex 



WISCONSIN— $108.55. 

Received by Rev. H. W. Carter, Mer- 
rill, Scand. Ch 

Cumberland, First, by Rev. W. T. 
Ream 

Curtiss. German Evan Zion's Ch., by 
Rev. J. Schaerer 

Fond du Lac, J. A. Bryan 

Glen wood, Swedish Ch., by Rev. O. 
Ohlson 

Racine, Estate of Jane Parry, by E. 
D. Davis, Ex 

Wood Lake and Doctors Lake, Swed- 
ish Ch.'s, by Rev. F. G. Hagquist. 

IOWA— $389.90 ; of which legacy, 
$379.40. 

Elkader, Leeacy of Mary H. Carter, 
by W. A. Preston 

Gri'nnell, Mrs. C. A. Lyman, Silver 
Circle 

Iowa City. First, by M. Troth. 



MINNESOTA— $422.50. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. M. W. 
Skinner, Treas. : 

Austin 

Brainerd, People's Ch 



43 85 

2 80 

3 10 
9 65 
2 50 
1 00 

4 40 

67 3° 



20 00 
1 00 



6 61 
1 35 



4 


00 


3 


00 


3 


25 




20 


1 


25 


95 


35 


1 


50 



5 o° 
5 50 



6 4 



The Home Missionary 



July, 1 8c 



Crooksti m §6 50 

Dawson 8 00 

Excelsior 758 

Faribault 2 50 

Glencoe 5 co 

Havvley 8 30 

Minneapolis, Plymouth 12 41 

Fremont Avenue 10 co 

Vine, C. E. 2 40 

Lyndale, S. S 8 34 

Lora Hollister 5 00 

A Friend 5 00 

Mazeppa 500 

Jr. C . E. Soc 1 00 

Marshall 8 96 

New Richland 7 00 

Owatonna 17 75 

Rochester, to const. Mrs. J. F. 

Taintor a L. M 63 60 

C. E. Soc 4 00 

Sauk Centre 8 00 

Stewart ville 3 co 

St. Paul, Park 12 80 

Plymouth 24 79 

St. Anthony Park 10 00 

Worthing ton 3 00 

S. S 2 00 

Waseca 135° 

C. E. Soc 1 25 

West Dora 2 00 

Winona, First, for Salary Fund 82 00 

364 68 

Less expenses 1000 

354 68 
Brownton and Stewart, by Rev. J. 

W. Danford 182 

Crookston, First, by W. E. Slocum... 8 52 
Granada and Fraser, by Rev. C. G. 

O.xley 2 85 

Hancock, by Rev. G. R. Searles 5 00 

Lyle, Y. P. S. C. E., by B. L. Ander 

son 3 88 

Minneapolis, Bethany Ch., by Rev. S. 

G. Updy ke ' 7 50 

North Branch and Sunrise, by Rev. 

W. A. Wilkinson 1 25 

Perham, by Rev. W. E. Griffith 10 00 

Silver Lake, Boh. Free Reformed Ch., 

by J. S. Jerabek 25 00 

Villard, by Rev. B. Samuel 2 00 



KANSAS— $271.03 

Received by Rev. A. C. Hog-bin, 
Treas. : 

Buffalo Park 

Centralia 

Collyer 

Council Grove 

Ford 

Garnett. 

Mound City. S. S. Class 

Muscotah, S. S 

North Topeka, S. M. White 

Oberlin, S. S 

Overbrook 

Pittsburg, N. Brayman 

Ridgeway 

Woman's H. M. Union, Miss M. E. 
Wilkinson, Treas. : 

Alma 

Jr. C. E. for Alaska 

Athol 

Fairview 

Fancy Creek. Goshen Church 

Goodland 

Lawrence. Plymouth Ch 

Neosho Falls, Jr. C. E 

Newton, S. S 

Parsons 

Plevna 



2 


80 


23 


00 


I 


40 


16 


55 


5 


00 


1 


5° 


1 


So 


S 


80 


5 


00 


2 


00 


21 


80 


1 


00 


3 


28 


90 


63 


6 


20 


2 


5° 


2 


00 


7 


76 


5 


00 


8 


00 


3 


95 


2 


SO 


3 


98 


16 


00 


9 


10 



1 


01 


7 


5 


33 


9: 


20 


68 


5 


CO 


11 

3 

6 


\ 


46 


5' 


14 


7- 


4 


1 .,-, 


1 


-•5 



Ridgeway $6 

St. Marys 2 

Seneca 24 

Sterling 5 

Stockton 5 

Topeka, First 40 

149 

Less expenses 2 

146 
Received by Rev. L. P. Broad : 

Buffalo Park 441 

Collyer 24 

Ellis 50 

Fort Scott 13 5. 

Pittsburg, N. Brayman 

Vienna 



NEBRASKA— $114.28. 

Received by H. A. Snow. Treas. : 

McCook 

Neligh 

Newcastle 

. Y.P. S. C. E 

Daily Branch Ch 

Arborville, Ch., $7.18; Sr. Y. P. S. 

C. E., $3 54 ; Y. P. S. C. E., $4, by 

F. N. Recknor 

Butte, German Ch. of Zion, $2 ; and 

Naper German Ch. of Christ, $2, by 

Rev. J. Single 

Carroll, Welsh Ch., by Rev. S. Jones. 
Danbury, First Ch., by Rev. E. C. 

Hayes 

Fairmont, by G. E. Aldrich 

Germantown and Oak Grove, Neb., 

German Ch.. by Rev. F. Worth .... 

Indianola, by M. Powel 1 

Sutton, $2 ; Stockham, $1, by Rev. G. 

Essig 

Walter, Emmons German Ch., by 

Rev. H. Hess 

\Erratum : The acknowledgment in 
April number. December receipts, as 
Curtis, Neb., Mrs. Preston, $9, should be 
Eustis, Mrs. C. W. Preston, #9.] 



NORTH DAKOTA-$io, 390.38; of 
which legacies, $10,347.50. 

Buxton, Estate of James P. Gould, by 

Mrs. A. M. Gould 9,342 50 

Estate of J. P. Gould, by T. H. 

Goodspeed. Ex 1,005 °° 

Dickinson, by Rev. U. G. Rich 18 88 

Ft. Berthold, Ch. and S. S., $5; El- 

bovvoods, $6, by Rev. C. L. Hall.... 11 00 

Hope, by Rev. J. J. Davy 8 00 

Melville and Rose Hill, by Rev. W. 

N. Johnson 5 00 

SOUTH DAKOTA— $160.18. 

Received by Rev. W. H. Thrall, Ver- 
million 24 25 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. F. M. 

Wilcox, Treas. : 

Alcester 200 

Athol 5 25 

Belle Fourche 3 00 

Canova 1 50 

Clark, Mrs. A. H. Robbins and 

family 3 00 

Columbia 200 

Deadwood 300 

Elk Point 5 40 

Millbank 1 25 

Vermillion 400 

Wakonda 4 00 



1 94 
17 3 6 



3 co 
17 5° 



3 °° 

5 °° 



July, i{ 



The Home Missionary 



Watertown.. . . 
Willow Lakes. 



Aurora, First, by Rev. T. H. Hill.... 
Bethlehem, German Ch., by Rev. J. 

Single 

Elk Point, by Rev. E. W. Jenney . . . 

Estelline, by Rev. E. W. Jenney 

Eureka, A Friend . . . 

Frankfort, by Rev. F. E. Van Liew. . 

Garretson, by Rev. H. G. Adams 

Hot Springs, by Rev. J. B. Long 

Meckling, by Rev. G. W. Crater 

Mission Hill, by Rev. D. B. Nichols.. 

Mitchell, by Rev. D. R. Tomlin 

Waubay, by Rev. E. J. Sarkeys 

COLORADO— $121.40. 

Received by Rev. H. Sanderson, 
Western Association 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. B. C. 
Valentine, Treas 

Denver, First, by Mrs. A. Rice 

Globevirle, First German Ch., by 

Rev. A. Traudt 

Ward, by E. Berryman, through A. B. 

Mead 

WYOMING-fio.oo. 

Woman's Miss. Union, Mrs. A. E. 
Kevan, Treas.: 
Cheyenne, First 

"UTAH— $81.00. 

ProvoCity, by Rev. S. H. Goodwin.. 
Salt Lake City, Rev. J. Newton Brown 

IDAHO— $15.80. 

Woman's Missionary Union, L. H. 
Johnston, Treas. : 

Mountain Home 

Challis 



Wardner, by Rev. H. L. Hopkins... 



s,s 


20 


4 


00 


43 


60 


4 


CO 


4 


00 


10 


J 5 


22 


00 


5 


00 


4 


80 


12 


63 


12 


00 


5 


25 


2 


So 


5 


00 


5 


00 



6 00 

75 00 



5 


00 


5 


00 


10 


00 


5 


80 



CALIFORNIA-$i55.o 2 . 

Escondido, by Rev. J. T. Ford 

Etna, Callahans, McConnaughy and 

Oro Fino, by Rev. C. E. Chase 

Los Angeles, Bethlehem Ch., by Rev. 
D. W. Bartlett 

G. A. Rawson 

Mentone, by Rev. G. Robertson 

San Diego. H. Sheldon 

Mrs. E. E. Wiggin 

San Francisco, Fourth Ch., by Rev. 

S. Slocombe 

San Rafael, First, by W. H. Atkinson 

Santa Ana, First, by M. Cotter 

Santa Rosa, First, by Rev. L. D. 

Rathbone 



OREGON— $186.66 ; of which legacy 

$166.66. 

Clackamas, Estate of Samuel Shep- 
herd, by A. Mather, Ex 

Estate of Samuel Shepherd, by A. 

Mather and D. B. Gray, Exs 

Freewater, by Rev. W. Hurlburt 

Sherwood, by Rev. J. M. Barber 

Portland, Sunny Side Ch., by Rev. J. 
J. Staub 



WASHINGTON-$8. 5 o. 

Aberdeen, Swedish Miss., by Rev. M. 
Peterson 

Hillyard, First, by Miss R. M. Ed- 
wards 

Leavenworth, by Rev. J. W. H. Lock- 
wood 



65 



3 


00 


10 


00 


2 


25 


2S 


00 


12 


60 


5 


00 


2 


20 


12 


50 



56 25 



83 33 
83 33 



5° 
6 00 



Collection at Woman's Meeting, An- 
nual Meeting of C. H. M. S., at 

Hartford, Conn., June 23-25, 1899.. 400 00 

May Receipts: Contributions 10,902 84 

Legacies 11,961 84 

Interest 136 13 

Home Missionary 28 80 

Literature 4 13 



$23,°33-74 



DONATIONS OF CLOTHING, ETC., 



Received in March, 1899 



Belvidere, 111., Ladies, by Miss Alice R. 

Warren, box $10 00 

Bridgeport, Conn., Woman's Benev. 
Org. of First Ch., by Annie H. 

Hincks, box 175 54 

Second Ch., by Mrs. Geo. L. Porter, 

barrel 25 00 

Brooklyn, N. Y., Zenana Band of Cen- 
tral Ch., by Miss W. B. McGrath, 

two barrels and package 227 67 

L. B. S. of Clinton Ave. Ch., by M. 

C. Thompson, two boxes and cash. 274 00 
L. B. S. of Tompkin's Ave. Ch., by 

Mrs. H. L. Higgins, box 7604 

Canaan, Conn., Miss. Soc, by Mrs. M. 

G. Adams, box 50 00 

Cleveland, O., Home Dept. of Euclid 
Ave. Ch., by Mrs. A. J. Smith, two 

barrels and box 152 48 

Danbury, Conn., Y. P. S. C. E. of First 

Ch., by Grace Clark, box 76 00 

East Hartford, Conn., Ladies, by Mrs. 

E. Ackley, barrel 49 50 

5 



Elyria, O., Ladies, by Miss C. E. Cran- 

dall, box ■ 84434 

Falls Church, Va., by Gertrude Nourse, 

barrel 43 50 

Fairport, N. Y., Ladies, by Mrs. E. B. 

Pratt, two boxes and cash 99 50 

Hampton, N. H., Y. P. S. C. E., by 

Anna M. Cole, box and barrel 75 75 

Hartford, Conn., Ladies of First Ch., 

by Mrs. E. C. Curtis, three boxes.. 276 00 

L. H. M. S. of Pearl St. Ch., by Miss 
Florence M. Cone, box and barrel. . 179 01 

Ladies' Sew. Soc. of South Ch., by 
Mrs. J. D. Candee, box, barrel and 

cash 105 34 

Haverhill, N. H., Ladies' Miss. Com. of 

First Ch., by Alice M. R. Skinner, box 40 00 

Kane, Penn., Ladies, by Mrs. Chas. A. 

Jones, barrel 66 03 

Kansas City, Mo., First Ch., by Mrs. C. 

H. Kirshner, barrel and package 68 2-, 

Litchfield, Conn., L. H. M. S., by Mrs. 

H. R. Coit, box 85 43 



66 



The Home Missionary 



July, 189L 



Lyndonville. Vt., L. A. S., by Mrs. A. 

L. Finney, two barrels and check $61 00 

Manchester, Vt., W. M. S., by Mrs. 

Theodore Swift, barrel 70 00 

Meriden, Conn., Ladies of Center Ch., 

by Mrs. F. A. Augur, barrel 150 85 

New Haven, Conn., Ladies' Aid Soc 

of United Ch., by Mrs. H. S. De 

Forest, box 160 87 

New London, Conn., Ladies, by Miss 

Alice Chew, box 160 00 

New Preston, Conn., Girls' S. S. Class, 

by Mrs. Dayton Burnham, box 20 00 

New York City, Ladies of Broadway 

Tab., by Mrs W. S. Seamans, fourteen 

trunks and box 1,736 33 

North Hampton. N. H., Ladies' Dorcas 

Circle, by R. M. Chapman, package.. 20 43 

Norwich, N. Y., Woman s Working 

Asso. of First Ch., by Mrs. George 

Marr, barrel 36 90 

Orange, N. J., Ladies of Orange Valley 

Ch., by Mrs. A. L. Russell, box 300 00 

Portland, N. Y.. First Ch.. by Mrs. W. 

H. Burr, package 16 45 

Portsmouth, N. H., Ladies, by Mrs. E. 

S. Owen, barrel 9625 



St. Johnsbury, Vt., Ladies, by Mrs. F. 

E. Morse, box £50 o I 

W. H. M. S. of North Ch.. by Mrs. 

Philip H. Stone, two barrels 94 at 

Stafford Springs, Conn., Ladies, by- 
Mrs. Ellen J. McLaughlin, box 100 c 

Staffordville, Conn., Ladies of Stafford- 

ville and West Stafford, by Rev. J. A. 

Solandt, box .... 75 oc I 

Stratford, Conn., Ladies, by Mrs. R. W. 

Bunnell, barrel .. 140 001 

H. M. Sew. Soc, by Mrs. R. W. Bun- 
nell, sewing machine. 
Summer Hill, N. Y.. L. M. S., by Mrs. 

Chas. Ranney, package 21c 

Ware, Mass., Miss Sage's S. S. class, by 

Miss M. A. Barlow, barrel 70 00 j 

Webster Groves, Mo., Woman's Asso. of 

First Ch., by Mrs. L. D. Wright, 

barrel 75 00 

West Brattleboro, Vt., L. B. S., by Mrs. 

C. S Clark, barrel 51 75 

West Hartford, Conn, Ladies, by Mrs. 

W. H. Hall, barrel s 

West Winfield, N. Y., Ladies, by Mrs. 

F. E. Wood, box £ 

$5,826 03 



Received in April, \l 



Bennington, Vt., Ladies of Second Ch., 

by Miss Julia A. White, box $147 37 

Bridgeport, Conn., Mrs. W. B. Beach, 

two packages 35 00 

Bridgewater, N. Y., Aux.of L. H. M. S., 

by Mrs. D. S. Wood, barrel 61 72 

Bristol, Conn., W. H. M. Aux. to the 

Union, by A E. North, barrel 9218 

Brooklyn, N. Y., L. B. S. of Clinton 

Ave. Ch., by Mrs. J. B. Thomson, two 

boxes, barrel and package 145 00 

Exeter, N. H.. H . M. S. of Phillips Ch., 

by Mary Gordon, two boxes 133 63 

Hartford, Conn., Woman's Union of 

Christian Work of Fourth Ch., by 

Mrs. R. Foster, barrel 61 20 

Ithaca, N. Y., Ladies of First Ch., by 

Mrs. C. M. Whiton, barrel and cash.. 25 00 



Middletown, Conn., South Ch., by Nel- 
lie A. Douglas, box $98 50 

New Haven, Conn. L. H. M. S. of Ply- 
mouth Ch., by Mrs. L. H. Fowler, 
two boxes 174 69 

New Haven, Conn., L. A. S. of Ch. of 
the Redeemer, box 115 00 

Norwalk, O., L. M. S., by Mrs. F. H. 

Hayes, box 60 00 

St. Louis, Mo., Ladies' Asso. of Pilgrim 
Ch., by Mrs. S. Owens, three packages 150 00 

Washington, Conn., Ladies, by E. B. 
Baker, barrel 36 50 

West Hartford, Conn., First Ch., by 

Mrs. W. H. Hall, barrel 26 51 

Windsor Locks, Conn., Ladies, by Mrs. 

C. H. Coye, barrel 50 00 

$1,412 30 



Received in Mav, ii 



Concord, N. H., Ladies of First Ch., by 

Miss Mary F. Gibson, box $179 21 

Young Ladies' Miss. Soc, by Miss Nel- 
lie J. Vaulor, box 4050 

South Glastonbury, Conn., Ladies' Miss. 
Soc, by Mrs. K. B. Sturdevant, box.. 65 75 

Stockbridge, Mass., Alice Byington, two 
packages 16 14 

Syracuse, N. Y., The Miss. Committee 
of Danforlh Ch., by Mrs. James Wig- 
gins, box 50 00 

Thompson, Conn., Ladies' Miss. Soc, 
by Mrs. J. Scott Lewis, box and 
barrel 96 96 

Newton, la., Christian Workers' Soc, 
by Mrs. W. N. Crouch, box and pack- 
age 60 50 



North Bloomfield, O., The Misses E. H. 
and A. F. Brown, by Mary J. McAdoo, 
two boxes S60 00 

Waterbury. Conn., Woman's Benev. 
Soc. of Second Ch., by Mrs. J. M. Bur- 
rell, box 14000 

Ware, Mass., Mrs. Sage's S. S. Class, by 

Maria A. Barlow, barrel 70 00 

Watertown. Conn., Ladies' Benev. Soc, 
by Mrs. Henry T. Dayton, box and 
cash ' 8662 

Wethersfield, Conn., by Mrs. Augusta 
M. Smith, box and barrel 125 90 

Winsted, Conn., Home Miss. Dept. of 
Woman's Union of First Ch., box. ... 82 34 

$1,073.92 



jly, i J 



The Home Missionary 



67 



6 48 



AUXILIARY STATE RECEIPTS 
NEW HAMPSHIRE HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

Attributions Received by the New Hampshire Home Missionary Society during the 
quarter ending April 30, 1899. Hon. Lyman D. Stevens, Treasurer 

ebanon, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. S. Carter, 

$20. and Mr. and Mrs. Amsden, $0... 

>over, First Ch. and Soc • • . 

ennington, Ch. and Soc, $4.13 ; V. f. 

S. C.E.. $2.35 for CH. M.S. . 

mherst, Ch. and Soc, forC.H.M.S.. 

'embroke. First Ch. and Soc. ■ 

ilstead, Third Ch. and Soc, $6.55, and 

Y. P. S. C E., f2.5o 

ilton, Ch. and Soc 

franklin, Ch. and Soc •■ 

.isbon, Ch. and Soc, $8.20: Mary A. 

Cummings, $75, for C. H. M.S....... 

Volfborough, Income of the bstate 

Nancy K. Lord 

Infield, Legacy of Dorcas Emerson, in 

lanchester, Y.' P." S. C." E.' of Franklin 

St. Ch. and Soc, $25 ; legacy of Mrs. 

Nancy Barr, $1,000 ; legacy of Mrs. 

Lucy A. Plummer, $500; income ol 

Abigail S. Knowles' estate, $153.70; 

Ladies' Benevolent Soc, $26 

Penacook, Ch. and Soc 

Zandia, legacy of Nancy Parker 

Conwav, Second Ch. and Soc 

South Merrimac, Ch. and Soc 



5 
22 


25 

66 


9 
23 


°S 
62 


10 


00 



83 2° 



8l 77 



1,704 70 
13 62 

1,000 79 
5 60 
9 00 



Hancock, Ch. and Soc 

West Lebanon, Ch. and Soc 

Hinsdale, S. S. of Ch. and Soc 

North Hampton, Ch. and Soc 

North Weare, Y. P. S. C. E 

Langdon , Ch. and Soc 

Nelson, Ch. and Soc 

Rindge, Ch. and Soc 

Marlborough, Ch. and Soc 

Concord, South Ch. and Soc 

Chichester, Rev. F. D. Chandler 

Atkinson. Ch. and Soc 

West Manchester, South Main St. Ch. 

and Soc 

Hopkinton, Ch. and Soc 

Bristol, legacy in part of Mrs. Mary A. 

Crockett 

Keene, First Ch. and Soc 

Kingston. Ch. and Soc 

Oxford, Y.P.S. C. E 

Bath. Y. P. S. C E 

Franconia, Ch. and Soc 

New Castle, Ch. and Soc 

Hollis, Ch. and Soc 

Charlestown, Ch. and Soc 

North Barnstead, Ch. and Soc 



$5 


00 


21 


34 


5 


00 


2 5 


00 


3 


00 


2 


81 


10 


CO 


25 


00 


14 


17 


143 


77 


3 


S 1 


8 


54 



977 


04 


5° 


00 


4 


02 


5 


00 


12 


5° 


8 


37 


2 


40 


9 


5° 


13 


39 


4 


25 



MASSACHUSETTS HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 



[Receipts of the Massachusetts Home Missionary Society in March, il 

B, Palmer, Treasurer 



Rev. Edwin 



Abington, First, by J. T. Richmond .... 
Amesbury, Union, S. S., by Rev. G. W. 

Christie • ■ ■ • ■ • - • • • ■ 

Amherst, North, Miss Martha E. Har- 
rington • ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ ■ • ■ - 

Barnstable, West, by Rev. E. B. French 
Bedford, Trin.. by W. M. Sawin „ . . ■. . 
Bernardston, Goodale Memorial Ch. C. 

E. Soc, by Kate M. Crowell 

Boston, Charlestown, Winthrop, by Geo. 

S. Poole - • ■ 

East. Baker, S. S. Army, by Rev. J. 

C.Young - 

Old South, Hope Chapel, by George 
Ridler, for Greek Work, $10.00.* 

Park St., by Geo. M. Butler 

Roslindale, by R. B. Grover. 

Roxbury, A Friend 

Highlands, A Friend . . . . 

Wal. Ave.,C E. Soc,byW.CEw- 

ing 

S. S., by Chas. T. Barry... 

South , Phillips, by H . C . Bird 

Boxboro, by A. W. Wetherbee.. ....... 

Braintree, First, A Member, by M. 

Helen Keith 

Brockton, " J " ■■■•;■ • • • • - • • • • • -.- • • 

Brookline, Harvard, by J. H. Shapleigh 
For Local Italian Mission. . . . ... ... .. 

Cambridgeport, Pilgrim, by N. H. Hol- 

brook 

* Received and 



$ 7 « Prospect St., by Wm. F. Hurter S198 99 

Chelsea, A Friend 1 °° 

3 00 Chesterrield, by Rev. H. E. Thygeson. . 5 00 

Chicopee, Second, by Chas. A. Taylor. 27 09 

5 00 Douglas, East, C E. Soc, by Miss A. 

1000 E. Luther, for Alaska 1000 

8 78 Easthampton, First, by W. H. Wright.. 38 22 

C E Soc, by W. H. Wright 182 

6 57 Easton. Evan., by Walter H. Andrews. 23 00 

Essex C E. Soc, by Miss Alice P. Burn- 

8,10 ham, for Alaska IO ™ 

Everett, Mystic Side, by E. S. Tracy ... 14 66 

\j -if c 4 00 

1 3S Fall River, Central',' by R. B.Borden... 562 47 

Fitchburg, German Ch., by Rev. S. H. 
9 i 00 Schwab. $5 : C E Soc Ss ■ ■ • ■ • ■ • 
% co Great Barrington. C. E. Soc, by Lilhe 

2 00 A. Fuller, for Alaska - . . 170 

100 00 Harwich, by W. H. Underwood, Taft 

thank-offering : . ••.••• 3° °° 

1000 Haverhill. Fourth, $2.50 : : Riverside, 

22 58 $7.50 ; by Rev. Geo. L. Gleason.. . . ... 10 00 

« 45 Holden, C. E. Society, by Carrie L. 

2300 Winn 200 

Holland, Ladies' H.M. Soc, by Mrs. J. 

20 °o Holyoke, Second.' by J.nV Hubbard. . . . 68 18 

7^24 Hopkinton. First, by Frank E.Hulen... 14823 

2107 Hyde Park, First, E. A. Runnells. ..... 4*53 

V Ipswich, A Friend, "P" ........ 500 

10 94 Lawrence, Trinity, by F. J. Ball ...... , 36 28 

acknowledged on special account. 



68 



The Home Missionary 



July, iS 



»:■■ 



Lowell, Armenian Population, by iev. 
H. K. Santikian, for Arm. W ork. 
S35-00.* 
High St , by G. H. Candee. for local 

Arm. Work, $35-33-* 
Tohn St., Ladies' Benev. Soc. by Mrs. 
Geo. H. Johnson, for local Arm. 
Work, $10.00.* 
Pawtucket, by J. J. Cclton, for local 
Arm. Work, *io.oo.* 

Mansfield, Orth. by S. E. Scholes $15 37 

Marblehead, First, by Nathan P. San- 
born , 37 00 

Middleboro. Central, t»y E. S. Hathaway 94 24 
Newton (Center), First, by J. E. Rock- 
wood 138 94 

S. S., by R. B. Van Norman, for 

Alaska 25 00 

Norfolk, Union, by Wm. E. Mann n 00 

Northbridge. Centre, by Rev. Jas. H. 

Childs 2600 

C. E. Soc, by Rev. Jas, H. Childs, 

for Alaska 500 

Northfield, by Miss M. T. Dutton 116 00 

Clark, Miss Sylvia, by Rev. W. G. 

Puddefoot 5 00 

Mt. Hermon, Boys' School, by W. F. 

Nichols 2500 

Old Colony, C. E. Local Union, by Miss 

H. E. Smith 10 00 

Otis, by Ralph H. Morton 1 20 

Peabody, Second, by Rev. L. J. Thomas 8 50 

Pittsfield. Rev. A. Boutieller, Rebate 

on account of Teaching, $25.00.* 
Plymouth, Pilgrimage, by Geo. O. 

Brown 20 70 

Reading, by Dean Peabody 20 00 

C. E. Soc, by Walter S. Brown, for 

Alaska 10 00 

Reed, Dwight Fund, Income of 40 00 

Proceeds of Scrip Sale, for Re-invest- 
ment 18043 

Rockland, Hicks, Mrs. Betsey A., by L. 

D Perkins 5 co 

Salem, Tabernacle, by C. R.Washburn. 65 33 

Warner, Mrs. S. C 10 00 

Shelburne, by Z. D. Bardwell 46 87 



Falls, by Miss C. E. Field 

Somerville, Broadway, by F. S. Holden 

(L. Ms. to be named 1 

First, by Geo. E. Dustin 

South Hadley, First, by L M. Gaylord. 

Springfield, " C APITALS " 

Springfield, H. M. T 

Sudbury. S< >uth. Memorial S. S 

Sutton, by C. E. Hutchinson 

Swampscott, by — Barker, for Rev. G. 

H . Adalian, Lynn 

Wakefield, by W. P. Preston 

Walpole, by S. E. Bentley 

East, by Thomas Corbett 

Waltham, Phebe S. Garfield 

Warren, First, by E. F. Wood 

Wnitcomb. David, Fund, proceeds of 

scrip sold, lor re-investment 

Whitin, J. C, Fund, income of 

Whitman, First, by Bela Alden 

Williamstown, Rev. John H. Denison, 

for " Deficit " 

White Oaks, Woman's Working Assoc, 

by Rev. G. V. Stryker 

Woburn, Montvale, by W. F. Greenough 
Worcester. Park Ave. Meth., Taft 

thank-offering 

Plymouth, by F. W. Chase 

Woman's Home Missionary Association, 
by Miss Lizzie D. White, Treas. : 

Grant to C. H. M. S 

Grant towards salary of Mrs. I. N. 

Tillinghast, Fr.-Am. Coll 

Grant towards salary of Miss 
Junek, Ware, $30.00.* 

From Hope Chapel. Boston, Old 

South, C.E.S.for Alaska 

From Winter Hill, Somerville, C. 
E. S., for Alaska 



$41 



k 



3 

5 » 



5 °< 

9 2 3 



.574 2£ 
50 oc 



1,639 2 8 



Home Missionary. 



$5,059 20 



Received in April, iSgg 



Andover, A Friend 

Greene, Joseph 

Ashbv. by C. F. Hayward 

Ashfield, by Mrs. Alvan Hall, L. M. to 
be named 

Barnstable. Cotuit, by John C. Fish. . . . 

Becket, North, by J . Norcott 

Bernardston. by H. L Crowell 

Blandford, North, by Mrs F M. Bliss- 
Boston, Dorchester. Friends 

Village, Ladies' H. M. Society, by 

£1-3. R. M. Swan 

Immanuel. by F. J. Wood 

Roxbury, Eliot. Packard, Mrs. Otis.. 

Highland, by W. M. Rufsell 

Shawmut. bv Frank Wood 

Boxford, West, by Rev. C. L. Hub- 
bard 

Brackett fund. Income 

Brimfield, First, by M. H. Corbin 

Brockton. Porter, by C. P. Holland 

Byfield, South, by Alvin C. Poor 

Cambridge, Hope, by Rev. C. M. Car- 
penter 

Chelsea. Central, by L. H. Watts 

Concord, Trinitarian, by Thomas Todd . 

Dunstable, bv Wm. P. Proctor, to const. 
Alice 1.. Rutterfield a L. M. of C. H. 
M S 



i?40 


00 




25 


11 


75 


57 


72 


17 


68 


15 


SO 


7 


65 


2 


5° 


5 


00 


21 


10 


400 


00 


5° 


00 


154 


00 


25 


00 


7 


10 


80 


'.0 


3° 


00 


5° 


00 


9 


5° 


5 


00 


4 


99 


4 


J 9 



50 00 



Fall River. Central, by R. B. Borden... 
Fitchburg, Rollstone. by David Lowe.. 
Framingham, South, Grace, by G. M. 

Amsden 

Georgetown. First, by C has. Holmes. . . 
Great Barrington, Housatonic, by Miss 

A. R. Turner 

Greenfield, Second, by Ida A. Crosby.. 
Greenwich. S S., by W. H. Glazier.... 

Gurney, R. C. fund. Income 

Haile, Sab. W. fund. Income 

Hale. E. T. M. fund. Income 

Haverhill, North. A Friend 

Holbrook, Winthrop, by F. W. Blan- 

chard 

Holland, by Mrs. J. G. Willis (add'l) ... 
Hyde Park. Clarendon, by lohn Holden. 

"L. E K." Oxford, O 

Leominster. Orth., by A. O. Wilder .. 
Lowell, Kirk St.. by A. L.Thompson, 

for local Armenian work, $40.00.* 
Lynn, Central, by I. K. Harris, for local 
Armenian work 

Chestnut St.. by Geo. E Sargent 

Lynnfield, So., C E. Society, b> Rev. 

Geo. E. Freeman 

Marion, VVittet 

Maynard, C. E. Society, by Lizzie A. 

Wilson 



$122 29 
25 56 

102 00 

19 08 

43 00 
41 65 
15 00 
28 00 

62 50 

55 °° 

20 00 

5 50 

5° 

10 00 

4 00 
52 06 



25 00 

3 5° 

5 00 
10 00 

16 95 



Received and acknowledged on special account. 



ply, Ii 



The Home Missionary 



69 



elrose, Ortta., by C. C. Goss . . . . . . $"8 00 

ewburyport, Prospect St., by A. H. 

Wells •. :•••:•,:•• * 4 ° S 

ew Marlboro, C. E. Society, by Alice 

L. Field ...--•■ z °° 

ewton, Auburndale, by C. C. Burr... . 3°= co 

(Center) First, a Friend ............. 100 00 

Eliot, bv Geo. N. Putnam (of which 

$« s Easter offering) ••■•"••• 86s °° 

Newtonviile. by L. E. Moore, for Rev. 

G. H. Adalian, Armenian 1° 47 

forthbridge. Whitinsville, E.-c.-a day 

Band, by Mrs. C. E. Whitin 16 41 

torwood, S. School, Prim. Dept, for 

object to be named 5 °° 

ittsfield, First, by Frank W. Dutton. . 4 S °° 

lvmpton , by Edmund Perkins 3 °° 

rlnceton, by Rev. C. A. White 79 °° 

leading, by Dean Peabody . ........... '5°° 

leed, Dwight, Fund, Bank Stock Re- 
duction, for re-investment, $800. 

Income 6 4 °° 

•lollins Fund, Income. ....... 2 ° °° 

Jutland, by Mrs. W. C. Temple 3 °° 

ialem, Crombie St. C E. Society, by 

Sarah A. Tomlinson ............. . . . 10 00 

Hodgkins, Lucy M., Est. of, by A. W. 

Richardson ••• IO ° °° 

Tabernacle, by C. R. Washburn, to 
const. Miss Susan E. Choate, Jr., a 

L.M. of C.H. M.S 52 68 

Sandisfield, New Boston, by E. R. Ing- ^ 

ham ,';."■;;"■";;"' 

Saugus, Clif tondale, by Miss H. A. Hay- 
wood «.••„■■■»— k"t»- ?2 

Sharon. Ch., $21.27 ; S. S., $10, by D. 

W. Pettee 3 1 2 7 

Shirley, by Rev. J. Torrey 1200 

Shrewsbury, by Henry Harlow . ... . . 9 00 

Somerville; Broadway, by F. E . Holden is 00 

C E. Society, by W. J. Bursan 2351 

Winter Hill, by J. R. Pitman 22 00 

Springfield, First, by Henry G. Camp. . 30° °° 
Hope,byJas. B. Keene 52 20 



Olivet, C. E. Society, by Helen A. 
Camp ••• ■ 

Stoneham, by O. W. Richarason 

Townsend, by J. W. Eastman 

Jr. C. E. Society 

Wall Fund, Income • ■ • ■ • 

Waltham, Trinitarian, by T. W. Tem- 
ple ... • ; 

Ware. East, by D. W. Ainsworth 

W T areham, First, by S. G. Bodfish 

" W C.," thank-offering 

Westford, Ch., $14.48 ; C. E. Society, 

West 7 Newbury,' Firsti by H. M. Good- 

Westport, Sunday School, by J. C. Ma- 
comber ■ 

Whitcomb, David, Fund, Income 

Whitin, J. C, Fund, Income. ......... 

Williamstown, Prof. O. M. Fernald ... . 

Winchester, First, Skiiiings, D. N., An- 
nuity, by Chas. E. Swett. ■■ 

Worcester, Hope, by Mrs. Emma Lr. 

Hall, Taft thank-offering 

Piedmont, by A. W. Eldred 

South Conference, by A. Armsby 

Two Sisters 

Union : — • • 

Woman's Home Miss. Association, by 
Miss Lizzie D. White, Treas.: 
Boston, Grant toward Salary 
of Mrs. I. N. Tilling- 
hast, of Fr.-Amer. Coll $50 00 
To Miss J. Junek, of 
Ware, $30.00* 
Dorchester. A Friend, for 

Alaskan Work 5 °° 

Somerville, Broadway Aux. 
for Italian Mission 10 00— 



$8 


96 


31 


85 


9 


07 


1 


00 


32 


.00 


iS 40 


372 


65 


6 


00 



Home Missionary. 



7 00 

7 CO 
137 5° 
337 5° 

20 00 

100 00 

41 00 

21 76 
16 54 
10 00 
61 29, 



Received in May, 1899 



Adams, by T. K. McAllister 

A Friend a"'A' 'h"i" 

Andover, Free, by Mrs. M. C. Cole, 

L. M. to be named - - ■ 

Ayer, by Mrs. M. L. Kingsbury, Taft 

thank-offering • 

Bank balances, Int. for three months. .. 

Billerica, North, Mrs. E. R. Gould 

Boston, B. S. D \"'H"W 

Dorchester, Second, E.-c.-a-day Band, 

by Miss E. F. Merrill ...... 

Jam Plain Central S. S., by E Seav- 

erns, for Greek Work, $20.00* 

Union, by W. H. White •■•••••• 

Braintree, First, Ladies' H. M. Soc, by 

Miss Sarah H. Thayer 

Brookfield , Rev. John C . Gibbs 

Brookline, Miss Annie T. Belcher...... 

Cambridge, Est. of Deborah Carlton, by 

Mrs. E. C. Moulton, Exec 

Dalton, First, by H. A. Barton, to const. 
Mrs. Chas. C. Bartlett, Mrs. Mary A. 
Price, and Frank H. Cleveland, L. 

M's.of C. H. M. S ■ 

Danvers, First, by Geo. Tapley. . . . . 
C. E. Soc, by Miss Mabel M. Kimball, 

Everett, Miss Mary Kent . ■ • • • 

Fitchburg, Calvinistic, by David U. 

Dole...^ 

Franklin, by J. H. Baker 

Frost, Rufus S.. Fund, Income 

Gurney, R. C, Fund, Income 

* Received 



$!, ,7 Haverhill, Union, by F. H. Dunmore. . $10 59 

Too 00 Ward Hill, by H. P. Waldo 325 

Hudson, by A. T. Knight •• *3 co 

« 00 Hyde Park, First, by E. A. Runnells. . . 22 15 

S S.,by H. Noyes 7 33 

,0 00 Inanda, So. Africa, Miss M E. Price 15 00 
54 50 Kingston, Mayflower, by Mrs. Mary H. 

1200 Peckham 2000 

10 To Lawrence, Samuel White ...... ... 5° 00 

Longmeadow, A Friend, by Rev. S. Or. 

coo Barnes ••■•■•. IO °° 

5 Leicester, First, by G. O. Currier ..... 3028 

Lowell, Eliot, by James Howard, for 
282 20 local Armenian work, $15.50.* 

Lynn, Central, by Rev. A. W. Moore, 

6o 00 for local Armenian work ........... 1 5 °° 

20 co First, by Miss C. M. Staten, for local 

2 o 00 Armenian work 5° °° 

North, by Anthony Earle 47 5° 

«o 33 Maiden, Linden, by J. D. Crosby .... 6 25 
75 Marion, J. W. Pitcher Annuity, by P. 

B.Hadley 4& 68 

Massachusetts, A Friend . . IO " 

i S o 00 Medford, West, by Henry M. Clapp 23 55 

,8 00 Milton, First Evan., by A. M. Tucker. . 43 43 

3 , £ Montague, Miller's Falls, by A. McCoy 4 92 
70 Newton, Eliot, by Geo. N. Putnam, for 

Italian Mission 

82 16 North Andover. by Frank W Frisbee 50 00 
7 20 Mi- L. A. Rae, to const. Miss L. A. 

c L M 3° °° 

12 00 Northbridge, Rockdale, by B.W. Brown, 4 °° 

and credited on special account. 



7o 



The Home Missionary 



July, ii\ 



Whitinsville, by Edward Whitin $1,524 45 

Est. of W. H. Whitin (not a legacy), 

by E. Whitin 500 00 

Palmer, Second, by D. L. Bodfish 29 31 

Peru, S. S. . by Jessie Barlow 5 00 

Plympton, Rev. V.J. Hartshorne .... 15 00 

Redding, by Dean Peabody 1500 

Sherborn, Pilgrim, by D. P. D. Coolidge 27 00 
Shrewsbury, E.-c -a Day Band, by 

Edith M. Harlow 6 00 

Shutesbury, by N. A. Briggs 25 00 

Southboro. Pilgrim, by Mrs. C. Temple 22 00 

Springfield, Hope, by Jas. B. Keene ... 44 co 

Olivet, by J. W. Nourbourn 36 26 

Sterling, by Rev. Geo. H. Pratt 23 00 

Sturbridge. First, by John F. Hebard.. 32 60 

Taunton. Union, by Geo. W. Read 19 63 

Winslow. by Geo. W. Andros 45 01 

Townsend, by J. W. Eastman 14 20 

Upton, by B. C. Wood 11 77 

Ware, Est. of Mrs. L. W. Bangs, by 

Elizabeth M. Hall, Exec'x 5000 

Westford. by Miss May Atwood 4 50 

Weymouth, South, Old South, by Rev. 



H. C. Alvord $iotoro>'. 

Whitcomb, David, Fund, Income 250W 

Whitney Fund. Gift to const 10,000 1 i- 

Winchester, First, by H. A. Wheeler... 250 kai 
Worcester, Immanuel, by L. Pratt, Taft TV; 

thank-offering 20 |$P 

Wheeler, Miss Mary F 

Woman's Home Miss. Association, by 
Miss Lizzie D. White, Treas. : 
Grant towards salary of Mrs. 
F. H. Eldridge of Fr.- 

Am. Coll $200 00 

Mrs. I. N. Tillinghast of 

Fr.-Am. Coll 5000 

Miss Josephine Junek, of 
Ware, $30.00.* 
Boston, Rox. Wal. Ave. Aux. 
towards salary of Rev. 
Samuel Deakin 165 18— 415 

$15,646 el oe, 
Home Missionary 8 9 [, 

$15,655 ST 
I 



THE MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF CONNECTICUT 

Contributions for the month of March, 1899. Ward W. Jacobs, Treasurer, 

Hartford 



Barkhamsted, Riverton, by D. F. Ran 

som $5 00 

Bolton, by C. H. Loomis 6 20 

Brooklyn, First. Ch.,S. S., and Y. P. S. 

C. E., by M. W. Crosby 12 40 

By M. W. Crosby, for C. H. M S.... 40 00 
Canterbury, First, Estate of Emblem L. 

Williams, by Lucius B. Morgan, 

Trustee 1 1 22 

Chaplin, bv Frank C. Lummis, for C. 

H. M. S. 16 00 

Colchester, Westchester, by E. E. Car- 
rier 500 

East Haddam. First, by E. W. Chaffee. 3 52 

For C. H. M. S 6 85 

East Hartford, First, by Rev. S. A. 

Barrett 5 00 

Glastonbury, South Glastonbury, Ch. 

and S. S., by H. D. Hale 23 45 

Hartland, West Hartland, by Miss julia 

E . Wilcox 3 00 

Hartford, Zion, Swedish, by F. E. Wed- 

oerg 5 50 

Naugatuck, by Miss Ellen Spencer 100 00 

Special collection 7 25 

New London, First, by P. LeRoy Har- 

wood 24 84 

Norfolk, by Stephen A. Selden 49 16 

Old Saybrook, by Robert Chapman 7 05 

For C. H. M. S 7 04 



Stamford, Long Ridge, by Stephen S. 

Crane $5 00 .1 

Stratford, by Rev. Joel S. Ives 38 50 

Suffield, First, by W. E. Russell, to- 
gether with previous contributions to 
constitute Mi^s Clara E. Crane a L. M. 45 • 

Thomaston. First, bv H. A. Welton, for 

CH. M. S .... 

Thompson, by George S. Crosby, for C. 

H.M. S 

Torrington, First, S. S., by Mary P. 

Hayes 8 78 

Torringford. by C. H. Barber 22 53 

Trumbull, by Willard S. Plumb 7 32 

Warren, by A. B. Camp 2000 

Waterbury. First, by Lester M. Camp.. 130 01 

S. S., by H. A. Hoadley 20 00 

Windham, by William Swift 34 18 

W. C. H.M. U., of Conn., by Mrs. 
George Follett, Sec'y, New Britain, 
South Aux., by Mrs. M. S. Wiard, 
Treas., for Salary Fund 17 89 

73 * 5° 

Missionary Society of Conn 618 13 

Cong. Home Missionary Society 113 37 



Contributions for tin- month of April, 1899 



Ashford, by Nelson Hammond $800 

Bridgeport, Second, by O. H. Broth- 
well 34 5° 

Brookfield, by C. E. Vroman, for C. H. 
M. S 30 35 

Canton Center. Ch. and Soc, by Mrs. 

Louise M. Hallock 12 50 

Chaplin, by Frank C. Lummis 16 00 

Danbury, First, " Weekly Offering 
Fund.'" by Harriet E. Averiil 67 58 

Glastonbury, South Glastonbury. H. D. 
Hale. Personal, for C. H. M. S 50 co 



Hartford, Park, bv Willis E. Smith. . . . 

Hartland. East Hartland, by Rev. W. 
E. B. Moore 

Madison, North Madison, by Joel M. 
Hill 

Middletown, First, by E. P. Augur.... 

New Hartford. Nepaug. by J. B. Spen- 
cer 

New London, Second, Est. J. N. Harris, 
\ of js of income from Trust Fund .. 

Plymouth, Terryville, by George C. 
Clark 



$65 70 



13 57 
17 54 



2,708 34 

32 85 



* Received and credited on special account. 



July, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



7i 



rospect, by Rev. W: H. Phipps 

Ijomers, by L. W. Percival 

Somersville, by William H. Billings.. 

Ktafford, Staffordville, by Rev. H. M. 
Vaill 

Stonington, First, by Rev. J. O. Bar- 
rows 

Irolland, by E. S. Agard 

Torrington, Torringford, by Myron N. 
Sherwood, for C. H. M. S 



itO 


5° 


13 


75 


7 


00 


4 


So 


?2 


66 


15 


64 



Vernon, Rockville, W. F. Orcutt, Per- 
sonal $5 00 

Voluntown, Ekonk, Rev. John Elder- 
kin, Personal 8 00 

3.185 48 

Missionary Society of Conn 3,10463 

Cong. Home Missionary Society 80 85 



Contributions for the month of May, 1899 



Barkhamsted, by Wallace Case $9 45 

Bridgeport, Olivet, by L. F. Marshall.. 10 00 

Swedish, by Martin A. Moller 5 00 

Cheshire, by F. N. Hall 6 51 

Derby, First, by Luzon Hubbell 23 51 

East Windsor, First, by E. G. Morton.. 25 00 
Hartford, Pearl St., by George H. 

Stoughton .... 39 08 

Lisbon, by Calvin D. Bromley 7 35 

Middletown, First, by E. P. Augur 24 34 

Milford, Plymouth, by Albert A. Bald- 
win 325 

Montville, First, by J. C. Fellowes .... 9 69 
Naugatuck, by Miss Ellen Spencer, for 

C. H. M. S 150 00 

New Haven, Redeemer, by Wm. E. 

Rowland 33 10 

North Canaan, East, by A. B. Garfield. 4 05 

Old Saybrook, by Robert Chapman 7 65 

By Robert Chapman, for C. H. M. S. 7 65 
Plainfield, Wauregan, by Rev. S. H. 

Fellows 42 00 

Plymouth, First, by Arthur Beardsley. . 10 00 

Putman, Second, by E. M. Corbin 14 63 



Southington, Plantsville, by E. P. 

Hotchkiss $22 31 

Thomaston, First, by H. A. Welton 10 56 

By H. A. Welton, for C. H. M. S. . . . 12 07 

Vernon, Rockville, by H. L. James 185 93 

Winchester, West Winsted, by John 

Hinsdale 208 47 

Woodburv, First, by J. H. Linsley 23 24 

Woodstock, First, by Henry T. Child.. 18 12 

W. C. H. M. U. of Conn., by Mrs. Geo. 

Follett, Sec, Hartford, First, Junior 

Aux.. for salaries in M. S. C, by Mrs. 

M. W. Jacobus, Treas 55 00 



Congregational Home Missionary Soc. 
Missionary Society of Conn 



967 96 
169 72 
798 24 



[Correction. — On page 273, April number, Con- 
necticut receipts for February, " East Hartford, 
First, by E. C. Geer, $20.00," should be $20.14.] 



ILLINOIS HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY. 



Receipts of the Illinois Home Missionary Society in January and February , 1899. 

B. Mead, Treasurer 



Aaron 



Albion, First $16 66 

Union 2 25 

Alton (designated) 210 00 

Alto Pass 2 00 

Batavia, Mrs. Lucy Bull 500 

Mrs. L. C. Patterson 10 00 

Beardstown, 6 60 

Beechwood 975 

Bowen, S. S 6 39 

Canton 1736 

Chicago, R. E. Haskett 25 00 

South, Ladies' Soc. 25 00 

Jefferson Park (Y. P. S. C- E., §5.00).. 40 00 

German 3 00 

Bowmanville , 21 58 

Evanston Ave 30 02 

Englewood, Pilgrim 25 75 

Mizpah 6 79 

Lake View (Ladies' Soc, $5.00) 11 18 

Bethlehem 6 88 

Waveland Ave., Y. P. S. C. E 88 

Cobden 11 00 

Creal Springs 422 

De Kalb, Swedish 2 50 

Delavan, R. Hoghton 10 00 

De Pue, S. S 4 50 

Dover in 55 

Earlville (J. A. D., $25.00) 37 58 

Elmwood 38 47 

Galesburg, Central 40 60 



Geneseo §58 09 

Glencoe 60 05 

Hamilton 2 go 

Harvey 14 29 

Johnston City 1 50 

Joliet, Welsh, Rev. D. J. Davies 5 00 

Kaugley 4 00 

La Grange 18 00 

Marseilles, J. Q. Adams 25 00 

Morton 4 00 

Morgan Park, S. S 3 47 

Morton Park 5 00 

Naperville, German 7 50 

Neponset, Mrs. MaryE. Whaples 5 00 

New Grand Chain 5 29 

Oak Park, First, (S. S., $10.58) 157 55 

Second 54 63 

Third 2208 

Ontario 9 08 

Plainfield 15 50 

Roberts 1025 

Seward, Second 5 00 

Sheffield 13506 

Shirland 25 

South Danville 2 50 

St. Charles 12 00 

Sterling 14 10 

Sycamore 100 71 

Warrensburg, Plymouth 100 

West Chicago, W. P. Wheeler 2 00 



7 2 



The Home Missionary 



July, 1S99 



West Frankfort S6 12 

West Rockford 7 52 

Wilmette. Y. P. S. C. E 500 

Winnebago 25 x 

Wyoming ... 10 28 

L. B 100 00 

R. W. P 10000 

Secretary 25 00 

W. H. M. Union 21 41 

Chicago, New England 2500 

Union Park 37 60 

R avens wood 20 00 

University 9 60 

Pilgrim 1 1 49 

Covenant 935 

Douglas Park 1 00 



Sedgwick Street 

Dover 

Evanston 

Jacksonville 

Lombard 

Oak Park, Second 

Peru 

Plainfield 

Rockford, First 

Second 

Sycamore, Y. P. S. C. E. . 
Winnetka. 



Si 


00 


25 


00 


13 


00 


7 


37 


18 


1 


10 


to 


5 


00 


5 


00 


49 


68 


8 


75 


5 


00 


15 


00 


298 


35 


>2,o8o 


.S 



Received in March, 1S99 



Amboy 

Aurora, First 

New England (Y. P. S. C. E., $10.00) 

Austin, Swedish 

Batavia, Rev. T. E. Bissell 

Y. P. S. C. E 

Big Rock, George Wallis 

Brimfield 

Bureau 

Chebanse (S. S., $2.67) 

Chicago, First (Individuals, $225.001... 
Plymouth 1 Individuals, §12.00) 

New England, Victor F. Lawson 

Lincoln ParklY. P. S. C. E., $5.001... 

Union Park. E. K. Symonds 

South, Ladies' Society 

West, Pullman 

Ravenswood 

Jefferson Park 

Pilgrim 

South Chicago, First 

Rogers Park 

Crystal Lake . . 

Danvers 

Des Plaines 

Elburn 

Elmwood 

Farmington 

Glenview, S. S 

Godfrey 

Granville 

Hampton 

Harvard (S. Richardson, $3. 00) 

Harvey, Y. P. S. C. E 

Havana (Mr. and Mrs. Collins, $4.00).. . 

Healey 

Hinsdale 

Kavgley (S. S., $3.501... 

La Harpe, Miss Maynard 

La Moille 

La Salle 

Malta 

Mattoon (Woman's Soc, §8. 25) 

Melville, S. S " 

Mendon 

Metropolis 

Naperville, German Ch 

Neponset 

North Aurora 

Oak Park 

Olney 

Oneida (Calvin Burt, $10.001 

Paxton 

Payson (L. K. Seymour, S5.001 

Pecatonica 

Pittsfield 

Riley 

Rio (Ladies' Soc, 81500 : Ira R. Hall, 

$5.00) 

Rockefeller (Y. P. S. C. E., $5.00 ; S. S., 

$i-45) 



$35 °° 
33 2 5 

162 00 
5 00 
5 00 
5 °° 

1 00 
10 00 
10 00 

7 77 
264 04 

35 °° 
100 00 

26 27 

7 5° 

27 67 
!6 75 
67 25 

100 00 
54 °° 
10 00 
5 54 
*5 75 
9 00 
10 00 

18 00 

36 53 
16 52 

3 3i 
25 70 
36 24 

3 81 
13 00 

5 00 

6 50 

2 88 

8 69 

4 5° 

5 00 

'7 34 

9 00 

19 30 
33 2 5 

6 36 
32 89 
27 00 
10 CO 
r 9 39 

6 75 

7 *9 
5 55 

32 8g 

165 88 

24 72 

5 4° 

18 30 

5 33 

39 °° 



$46 03 



Rockford, First. (Y. P. S. C. E.. $2.00; . 

Roscoe 

Sandoval 

Seatonville. 

Seward, First 

South Danville (S. S., $5.00 ; Woman's 

Soc, $3.00) 

Spring Valley. First (S. S.. $10.00) 

Stillman Valley 

Sycamore, D. A. Syme 

Mrs. P. Sturtevant 

Henry Wood 

Thawville 

Victoria 

Wataga 

Waukegan, German 

Waverly 

Wheaton, First (Y. P. S. C. E..$ 3 . 5 o)... 

Wilmette, Jun. End. Soc 

Winnebago 

Yorkville 

Woman's Home Missionary Union. . . . 

Alton 

Aurora, New England 

Chicago, New England 

Lincoln Park 

Bethlehem 

California Avenue 

Rogers Park 

De Kalb 

Elmwood 

Evanston 

Gridley 

Illini 

Marshall 

Melvin 

Neponset 

Oak Park, First 

Rantoul 

Rockford. Second 

Sycamore 

Waverly , 



MISCELLANEOUS 

Rev. S. Penrield, Kansas City 1000 

Thomas C. MacMillan 50 00 

Estate of John Pierce, per Edward 

Pierce, Ex 50000 

Rev. John Wilcox, Wempletown 5 00 

E. S. Bent, Oglesby 5 00 

Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Bent, Oglesby 5 00 

CM. Avery, Peoria 50 00 

Rev. C. F. Van Auken 2500 

Cash .... 130 00 



12 


00 


12 


00 


5 


00 


9 


25 


T 3 


00 


41 


08 


S° 


00 


5° 


GO 


25 


OO 


5 


OO 


4 


12 


5 


OO 


3 


25 


6 


-r< 


7 


68 


56 


l8 


1 


OO 


7 


37 


12 


6, 


56 


00 


21 


75 


20 


GO 


72 


oc 


22 


IS 




OO 


5 


OO 


5 


00 


'5 


00 


5 


OO 


5 


OO 


3 


GO 


3 


GO 


13 


00 


2 


50 


15 


OO 


39 2 5 


7 


OO 


52 


84 


45 


CO 


3 


OO 



$3,283 06 



ily, ii 



The Home Missionary 



73 



MICHIGAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

eceipts of the Michigan Home Missionary Society in March, 1899. Rev. John P. 
Sanderson, Treasurer 



$24 00 Port Huron. First. 

fcnridge.::::::::::::::::::.:::^ *o 5 ° Rev. c.g. Rose... 

harlotte 2 5 °° 

heboygan "3° 

helsea, Y.P. S. C. E 5 °° 

larksville 8 x 5 

Columbus IO °° 

Corinth 3 2 5 

Covert 32 78 

Y. P. S. C E I 22 A 

Crystal 5 7 & 

Detroit, Good Samaritan 'S °° 

Dorr IO 5° 

astGilead J 5 °° 

Jalesburg ■ ■ • ■ ■ - 2 4 °° 

Jrand Rapids South, Y. P. S. C. E 7 °° 

Srand Rapids East 20 00 

rlancock , l66 38 

tiilliaids AV.V. I3 1° 

Jackson, Plymouth, Y. P. S. C. E 4 61 

I Birthday Boxes "•■••;••• 9 %% 

Kalamazoo, First, Bible School 12 88 

Kinderhook T ° 8 5 

Lake Odessa •••• 6 0O 

Lansing-, Plymouth 3° °° 

Ludington * x I2 

iMaple City 4 °° 

Merrill 6 7° 

; Y. P. S. C.E 2 5° 

Metamora 2 ° °° 

Newaygo 5 °° 

Old Mission 2 5 

Olivet 5o 27 

lOvid 22 l6 

Jr. Y. P. S. C. E 5 co 

Intermediate Y. P. S. C. E 1 50 

Richmond XI 2B 

Romeo 35 °° 

A Friend x 5 °° 

Rondo 5 5° 

Y. P. S. C. E 2 31 

Shelby • 3 3° 

c 5 2 20 

South Boston.' '.'.'.'. IO °° 

Watervliet 2 g 39 

Wayland 2 ° °° 

Wheatland l8 °° 

White Cloud 4 7S 

Williamston J co 

Wyandotte 7 57 

Y. P. S. C. E J 35 

Jr. Y. P. S.C. E - * ° 8 

Anonymous 370 00 

Interest on Permanent Funds 125 00 

W H. M. U. of Mich., by Mrs. E. F. 

Grabill, Treas 4°8 39 

$1,719 50 



jiio 00 
5 00 



Receipts of the W. H. M.U. of Michi- 
gan, for Home Missions for March, 
1899, Mrs. E. F. Grabill, Treas. : 

Addison, W. H. M. S 9°° 

Almont.W.M.S S 00 

Alpine Center, W. H.&F.M. S 2 00 

Ann Arbor, " S. E."........ 2 00 

W. H. M. S 5o 00 

Benton Harbor, L. M. U 5 00 

Breckenridge, W. H. M. U 4 75 

Bronson,W. H. M.U 5 00 

Ceresco, W. H. M. S 3 «3 

Dundee, W. H. M. U ■■• 7 85 

Ellsworth, W. H. M. U 3 5° 

Frankfort, W. H. M. U 7 00 

Galesburg, W. M. S. ..... .. . .. 31 °° 

Grand Rapids, Second, W. M. S 13 3° 

Greenville, W. H. M. S , 4 25 

Hopkins Station, W. H. M. U 12 00 

Interest on Notes 6o °° 

Kalamazoo, W. H. M. U 17 45 

Laingsburg, W. Asso 5° 

Lamont, W. M. S 9 00 

Lawrence, W. M. S 5 00 

Litchfield, W. M. S 8 50 

W M. S.,in memory of Mrs. Emily 

Tun-ell IO °° 

Marcelona, W. H. M. S 1200 

Muskegon, First, W. M. S 4° 00 

North Adams, W. M. S 18 50 

Olivet, L. B. S 33 °° 

Orion, W. M. S IO °° 

Onosso, W. M. S 22 12 

Pinckney, L. A. S 5 00 

Pontiac, W. M. S 3 5o 

Red Jacket. W. M. S 19 3° 

Reed City, W. MS 12 50 

Romeo, W. H. M. S 10 00 

Three Oaks, W. M. U 17 45 

Union City, L. H.M.U 7°° 

Wyandotte, W. M. S J 5 <*> 

5°i 3° 
YOUNG PEOPLE'S FUND 



POR THE DEBT 

East Nelson, Miss Carrie Eastman 

Bay City, Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Patcbell. 



Ann Arbor, Children's Miss. Soc 

Benton Harbor, Y. P. S. C. E 

Cooper, Y. W.-M. S 

Detroit, Boulevard S. b 

Lansing, Plymouth Jun. C E. Soc. . 

Onosso, Jun. C. E. Soc 

Pontiac, Y. L. M. S..... ........ 

Webster, Boys' and Girls' Miss. boc. 



51 00 
5 °° 



Amount of Totals. 



i.S 


00 


12 


00 


6 


00 


2 


5° 


3 


00 


2 


5° 


12 


5° 




40 


,53 


9° 


«555 


20 



Received in April 



Allendale 

Allen ville... 

Almont 

Y.P. S. C. E 

Alpine and Walker. 



M so 
5 °° 
70 00 
10 00 
17 5° 



Alpine Center. 

Armada 

Atlanta 

Athens 

Augusta 



»5 00 
20 22 
1 5° 
10 00 
20 50 



The Home Missionary 



July, 1 8. 



Bancroft $19 80 

S. S 1 27 

Bangor, First n 25 

West 3 59 

Baroda 150 

Bass River 100 

Bay Mills 1 1 00 

Bedford, S. S 1 75 

Belding 10 00 

Bellaire 1 1 00 

Benton Harbor 13 43 

Benzonia 48 90 

Y. P. S. C. E 5 00 

Big Prairie 2 60 

Big Rapids, First 10 80 

Township 6 40 

Big Rock 18 15 

Bradley 371 

Breckenridge. S. S 2 00 

Bridgman S. S 70 

Bridgeport 2 22 

Y. P. S. C. E 78 

Butternut 5 00 

Cadillac 28 39 

Calumet, S. S 1000 

Cannon 620 

Cannonsburg, S. S 1 00 

Carmel 400 

S. S 1 60 

Carson City ... 2 00 

Carson ville 6 43 

S. S 1 00 

Cedar Springs 29 00 

Central Lake 1 1 00 

Ceresco 4 50 

Charlevoix 50 80 

Jr. C. E 2 50 

S- S 570 

Charlotte 1750 

Y. P. S. C. E 10 00 

Chase 2 20 

Chelsea 7650 

Y. P. S. C. E 30 00 

Clinton 800 

Clinton, Y. P. S. C. E 16 00 

Conklin ... 1 2 00 

Cooper 21 66 

Copemish 8 60 

Coral 8 74 

Coastal 4 07 

Crystal 51 

Custer 2 22 

Delhi Mills, Mission 225 

Detroit, First 100 00 

Woodward Av 290 93 

Mt. Hope 13 98 

Y. P. S. C. E 3 co 

Jr. C. E " 50 

S. S 1 57 

Fort St 15 50 

S. S 13 25 

Canfield Av 7 04 

Delta 3 35 

Dexter 19 55 

Dorr, S.S 1 30 

Dover 3 50 

Durand 6 45 

Eastlake, S. S 2 03 

East Nelson 1500 

East Paris 9 00 

Edmore 10 go 

Y. P. S. C. E 3 75 

Ellsworth 10 50 

S. S 2 00 

Essexville 600 

Farwell 5 00 

Fenwick 1 50 

Flat Rock 215 

Flint . 18 75 

Frankfort. S. S 106 

Freeport 2576 

Fruitport 1 50 

S.S 1 10 

Gaylord 18 00 



Gladstone 

S. S 

Grand Blanc 

Grand Haven 

S. S 

Grand Junction 

S.S 

Grand Lodge 

Grand Rapids, First 

Plymouth 

South 

Barker Memorial 

Smith Memorial 

Smith Memorial, L. M. S. 

Grass Lake 

Greenville 

Hamburg 

Y. P. S. C. E 

Harrison, Miss Seaver 

Helena 

Homestead 

Honor 

Hopkins Station 

Howard City 

Hudson 

Hudson ville 

Irving 

Jackson, First .' 

Jr. C. E 

Johnstown and Barry 

S.S 

Kalamazoo 

Kalamao 

Kalkaska 

S.S 

Kendall 

Kenton 

Lacey 

Laingsburg 

Y. P. S. C. E 

Jr. C. E 

Lakeview 

Lansing, Plymouth 

S. S 

Lawrence 

Leonidas, S.S 

Leroy 

Leslie. First 

Second . 

Lewiston 

Lowell 

Mancelona 

Manistee 

Mattison, S. S 

Memphis 

Merrill 

Michigan Center 

Middleville 

Morenci 

Muskegon, First 

S.S 

Muskegon Mission 

New Haven 

Northport 

Y. P. S. C. E 

Nunica . . . 

Old Mission 

Olivet 

Onekama 

Onondaga 

Orion 

S. S 

Otsego 

Jr.C.E 

Ovid.S. S 

Owosso, S S 

Perrv 

Y.P . S. C.E 

Pincknev 

Pontiac, S. S 

Port Huron. First 

Twenty-fifth St 

Portland 

Port Sanilac 



5 
3 
3 
13 
2 
6 
250 



2 3 

140 1 



18 
5 
2 

25 

119 

4 



398 

15 



t July, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



75 



Ransom §15 00 

Y. P. S. C. E , 1 00 

Rapid River 3 06 

Red Jacket 30 00 

Y. P. S. C. E 2000 

S. S 6 27 

Reed City 2100 

S. S 4 7° 

Richmond is 15 

Y. P. S. C.E 5 00 

Jr. C.E 3 00 

Rochester 14 80 

Rockwood , 2 00 

Romeo 16 41 

Roscommoa 1000 

St. Clair...., 40 50 

St. Johns 17 18 

Y. P. S. C. E 5 00 

St. Joseph 90 50 

Saginaw 140 00 

Sandstone 13 50 

Y. P. S.C. E 3 00 

Saugatuck, S. S 2 14 

Sault Ste. Marie 28 00 

Sheridan 12 25 

Sidney 356 

Six Lakes 5 00 

Somerset, S. S 75 

South Haven 2850 

South Jefferson 7 45 

South Lake Linden 8 30 

Stanton, T. N. Stevens 20 55 

S. S 2 44 

Tawas City _, 6 00 

Thompsonville 10 60 

Three Oaks 45 00 

Three Oaks •. 10 00 

Tyrone 1 50 

Union City 105 00 

Utica, S. S 50 

Vanderbilt 1488 

S. S 1 45 

Vermontville. > 69 00 

Vernon, Y. P. S. C. E 5 00 

Jr. C. E 5 00 

S. S 2 03 

Vestaburg 5 00 

Victor 18 36 

S. S 70 

Vienna. 13 39 

Westville 5 00 

Wayne 15 co 

Y.P.S.C.E 7 oo 

Webster 19 co 

West Adrian ... 2 34 

Wheatfield 1 00 

White Cloud 6 70 

Whittaker 10 73 

Williamston S 75 

Helping Hand Soc 2 50 

Wolverine 25 00 

Ypsilanti 38 00 

W. H. M. U 1,164 59 

Interest 29 45 

Board of Trustees 9 95 

Anonymous 1 00 

$5,486 30 



W. H. M. U., per Mrs. E. F. Grabill, for 
W. H. M. U. of Detroit, First, in 
memory of Miss May C. Mallory to 
constitute Miss Maud G. Crawford, 



her niece, a life member of the W. 

H. M. S §5000 

Kalamazoo 10 00 

Hart 4 50 

Rev. A. Binkhorst 1000 

Board of Trustees 100 00 

Detroit. First 150 00 

Greenville 25 00 



;,8 35 80 

Receipts of Woman's Home Missionary 
Union of Michigan, for April, 1899, 
Mrs. E. F. Grabill, Treas. : 

Alpena, W. H.M.U 2100 

Ann Arbor, W. H. M. S 2000 

Benzonia, W. H. M. S 300 

Big Rapids, First, W. M. S 400 

Charlotte, L. B. S 2500 

Chelsea, W. M. S 2200 

Covert, W.M. S.... n 7S 

Detroit, First, W. Ass'n 70 00 

Woodward Ave. , W. U 43 75 

Mt. Hope, Ladies' Aid 3 20 

Boulevard. Ladies' Union i 50 

Flint, W. H. M. S 27 10 

Grand Haven, L. S 2 00 

Grand Rapids Park, W. H. M. S 8061 

Second, W. M. S 5 40 

Plymouth, W. M. S 8 67 

Greenville, W H. M. S., $6.60; A 

Friend, special, $25.00 3160 

Hancock, W. M. S 1000 

Hopkins Sta., W. H. M. U 1 25 

Interest on bonds 125 00 

Jackson, W. H. M. S 19 76 

Laingsburg, W. M. S 671 

Lansing, Plymouth, W. H. M. S .... 763 

Ludington. W. H. M. S 5000 

Manistee, W. M. S 2000 

Middleville, W. H. M. U 500 

Owasso. W. M. S 2400 

Portland, W. M. S 500 

Rochester, Ladies' Soc 7 40 

Saginaw, W. S ... 141 00 

St. Clair, L. S 1200 

South Lake, Linden, W. M. S 1000 

Tipton, L. M. S 1300 

Union City, W. H. M. U 2830 

Victor, W. H. M. S 250 

West Adrian, W. M. S 500 



Ann Arbor, Y. P. S. C. E 

Charlotte, Helping Hand Soc 

Flint, Jun. C. E. Soc 

Grand Rapids, Second, Y. P. S, C. E. 
Greenville, Y. W. M. S 

Jun. Miss. Band 

Hopkins Station, Y. P. S. C. E 

Kalamo. S. S. Easter offering 

Muskegon, First, Y. W. Cov. Circle. . 

Saginaw, S. S. Pri. Dept 

St. Clair, Y. P. S. C. E 

Jun. Y.P.S.C.E 

South Haven, S. S 

White Cloud, Y. P. S. C. E 



$874 


13 


8 


5 1 


5 


00 


1 


00 


10 


00 


2 


5° 


1 


45 


1 


«7 




5° 


2 


5° 


10 


00 


10 


00 


3 


00 


3 


60 


1 


00 


60 


93 



$935 °6 



R£ceipts for May 



Alba 

Allegan, Jr. C.E... 

Cadillac... 

Central Lake, S. S . 



$278 Chassell $400 

3 00 Clare 17 75 

25 00 Detroit, First 250 00 

1 00 Brewster 10 66 



j6 The Home 

Dundee $4 35 

Flint 3 °° 

Ironton 4 6° 

Jacobsville i oo 

Lake Odessa 2 50 

Pleasanton 7 75 

Port Sanilac 2 00 

Rev. J. McAllister, Detroit 5 00 

$344 39 

Receipts of the Woman's Home Mission- 
ary Union for May, i8gg. Mrs. E. 
F. Grabill, Treas. : 

FOR HOME MISSIONS 

Allendale, W. H. M. S g 00 

Allegan. W. M. S 7 85 

Benton Harbor, W. H. M. U goo 

Columbus, W. M. S 5 00 

Detroit, Fort St.. L. A. S 10 00 



Viissionary July, 18 

Dexter, W. H. M. S 552 

Grass Lake, W. H. M. S 15 „ 

Greenville, W. H. M. S. : 3 30 

Kalamazoo, W. H. M. U. (From the 

proceeds of a lecture given by Mrs. 

E. L. McLaughlin) 10 oo 

Muskegon, W. M. S 10 00 

Otsego, W. H. M. S 600 

Ovid, W. Gen'l Miss. Soc 4 co 

Three Oaks, W. M. S 755 

Ypsilanti. W. H. M. S 250 

$101 20 

YOUNG PEOPLE'S FUNB 

Detroit, First Young Woman's Union 25 00 

Litchfield, Jr. C. E 2 75 

2 7 75 
$128 9 s 



WOMAN'S STATE HOME MISSIONARY 
ORGANIZATIONS 

OFFICERS 



1. NEW HAMPSHIRE 

FEMALE CENT INSTITUTION 

Organized August, 1804 

and 

HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized June, i8go 

President, Mrs. W. D. Knapp. Somersworth. 

Secretary, Mrs. M. W. Nims, 3 Liberty St., Con- 
cord. 

Treasurer, Miss Annie A. McFarland, 196 No. 
Main St., Concord. 



4. MASSACHUSETTS AND RHODE 
ISLAND * 



WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY ASSOCIA- 
TION 

Organized February. iH8o 

Preside?zt, Mrs. C. L. Goodell, 607 Congregational 
House, Boston. 

Secretary. Mrs. Louise A. Kellogg, 607 Congrega- 
tional House. Boston. 

Treasurer, Miss Lizzie D. White. 607 Congrega- 
tional House. Boston. 



2. MINNESOTA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 
Organized September, 1872 



5. MAINE 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY AUXILIARY 

Organized June, 1880 



President, Mrs. Katherine B. Lewis, So. Berwick. 
President, Miss Catherine W. Nichols, 230 E. gth Secretary, Mrs. Gertrude H. Denio, 168 Ham- 

St.. St. Paul. mond St., Bangor. 

Secretary, Mrs. E. R. Shepard, 2828 Chicago Ave., Treasurer. Mrs. Rose M.Crosby. 64 Grove St., 

Minneapolis Bangor. 

Treasurer, Mrs. M. W. Skinner. Northfield. 



3. ALABAMA 
WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized March, 1877 

Reorganized April, 1889 

President, Mrs. G. W. Andrews, Talladega. 
Secretary, Mrs. J. S. Jackson, Montgomery. 
Treasurer, Mrs. E. C. Silsby, Talladega. 



6. MICHIGAN 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1881 

President, Mrs. I. P. Powell. 76 Jefferson Ave., 

Grand Rapids. 
Secretary, Mrs. E. N. Thorne, 212 So. Unii >n St., 

Grand Rapids. 
Treasurer, Mrs. E. F. Grabill, Greenville. 



* While the W. H. M. A. appears in the above list, as a State body for Massachusetts and Rhode 
Island, it has certain auxiliaries elsewhere. 



July, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



77 



7. KANSAS 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1881 

President, Mrs. R. B. Guild, 1336 Dillon St., 

Topeka. 
Secretary, Mrs. M. H. Jaquith, 1157 Filmore St., 

Topeka. 
Treasurer, Miss May Wilkinson, Ottawa. 

8. OHIO 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1882 

President \ Mrs C. W. Carroll, 48 Brookfield St., 

Cleveland. 
Secretary, Mrs. A. H. Williams, 227 Princeton St., 

Cleveland. 
Treasurer^ Mrs. George B. Brown, 2116 Warren 

St., Toledo. 

9. NEW YORK 
WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1883 

President, Mrs. Wm. Kincaid, 483 Greene Ave., 

Brooklyn. 
Secretary, Mrs. Wm. Spalding, 513 Orange St., 

Syracuse. 
Treasurer, Mrs. J. J. Pearsall, 153 Decatur St., 

Brooklyn. 

10. WISCONSIN 
WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1883 

President, Mrs. E. G. Updike, Madison. 
Secretary, Mrs. A. O. Wright, Madison. 
Treasurer, Mrs. L. E. Smith, Madison. 

11. NORTH DAKOTA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized November, 1883 

President, Mrs. J. L. Maile, Fargo. 
Secretary, Mrs. Silas Daggett, Harwood. 
Treasurer, Mrs. J. M. Fisher, Fargo. 

12. OREGON 

WOMAN'S- HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized July, 1884 

President, Mrs. F. Eggert, The Hill, Portland. 
Cor. Sec, Mrs. D. D. Clarke, 447 E. 12th St., No. 

Portland. 
Treasurer, Mrs. C. F. Clapp, Forest Grove. 

13. WASHINGTON 

Including Northern Idaho 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized July, 1884 

Reorganized June, 1889 

President, Mrs. A. Tudson Bailey, 805 First Ave., 

West, "Seattle. 
Secretary, Mrs. W. C. Wheeler, 424 South K St., 

Tacoma. 
Treasurer, Mrs E. B. Burwell, 323 Seventh Ave., 

Seattle. 



14. SOUTH DAKOTA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized September, 1884 

President, Mrs. C. E. Corry, Columbia. 
Secretary, Mrs. K. M. Jenney, Huron. 
Treasurer, Mrs. F. M. Wilcox, Huron. 

15. CONNECTICUT 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized January, 1885 

President, Miss Ellen R. Camp, 9 Camp St., New 

Britain. 
Secretary, Mrs. C. T. Millard, 36 Lewis St., 

Hartford. 
Treasurer, Mrs. W. W. Jacobs, 530 Farmington 

Ave., Hartford. 

16. MISSOURI 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1885 

President, Mrs. Henry Hopkins, 916 Holmes St., 

Kansas City. 
Secretary, Mrs. L. F. Doane, 3319 East Ninth St., 

Kansas City. 
Treasurer, Mrs. K. L. Mills, 1526 Wabash Ave., 

Kansas City. 

17. ILLINOIS 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1885 

President, Mrs. Sidney Strong, 234 N. Elmwood 

Ave., Oak Park. 
Secretary, Mrs. A. O. Whitcomb, 463 Irving 

Ave., Chicago. 
Treasurer, Mrs. Mary S. Booth, Chicago. 

18. IOWA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized June, 1886 

President, 

Secretary, Mrs. H. H. Robbins, Grinnell. 
Treasurer, Miss BelleL. Bentley, W. Grand Ave., 
Des Moines. 

19. CALIFORNIA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

Organized June, 1887 

President, Mrs. E. S. Williams, Sarafoga. 

Secretary, Mrs. F. B. Perkins, 546 24th St., Oak- 
land. 

Treasurer, Mrs. J. M. Haven, 1329 Harrison St., 
Oakland. 



20. NEBRASKA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized November, 1887 

President, Mrs. D. B. Perry, Crete. 
Secretary, Mrs. H. Bross, 2904 Q Street, Lincoln. 
Treasurer, Mrs. Charlotte C. Hall, 1318 C St., 
Lincoln. 



78 



The Home Missionary 



July, 1899 



21. FLORIDA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized February, 1888 

President, Mrs. S. F. Gale, Jacksonville. 
Secretary, Mrs. W. H. Kdmondson, Daytona. 
Treasurer, Mrs. W. D. Brown, Interlachen. 



27. GEORGIA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized November. 1888 

New Organization October, 1898 

President, Miss M. L. Graham, Savannah. 
Secretary, Miss Jennie Curtis, Mcintosh. 
Treasurer, Miss Mattie Turner, Athens. 



22. INDIANA 
WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1888 



28. MISSISSIPPI 
WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized April. 1889 



President, Mrs. W. A. Bell, 1211 Broadway, In- 
dianapolis. President, Mrs. C. L. Harris. 1421 31st Ave., Me- 
Secretary, Mrs. J. E. Hall, Alexandria. ridian. 

Treastirer, Mrs. Anna D. Davis, 1608 Bellefon- Secretary, 

taine St., Indianapolis. Treasurer,Mrs. L. H. Turner, 31 12 12th St., Me- 

ridian. 



23. SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 
WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 
Organized May, 1888 



2g. LOUISIANA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized April, 1889 



President, Mrs. Warren F. Day, 949 So. Hill St., 

Los Angeles. President, Mrs. L. St. J. Hitchcock, 2436 Canal St., 

Secretary, Mrs. Kate G. Robertson, Mentone. New Orleans. 

Treasurer, Mrs. Mary M. Smith, Public Library, Secretary, Mrs. Matilda Cabrere, 2419 Conti St., 
Riverside. New Orleans. 

Treasurer, Miss Mary L. Rogers. 2436 Canal St., 
New Orleans. 



24. VERMONT 
WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized June, 1888 

President, Mrs. W. J. Van Patten, 386 Pearl St., 
Burlington. 

Secretary, Mrs. M. K. Paine. Windsor. 

Treasurer, Mrs. Rebecca P. Fairbanks, St. Johns- 
bury. 

25. COLORADO 
WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1888 

Hon. Pres., Mrs. J. W. Pickett, Whitewater. 

President, Mrs. E. R. Drake, 18 Mack Block, 
Denver. 

Secretary, Mrs. Addison Blanchard, 3023 Down- 
ing Ave., Denver. 

Treasurer, Mrs. B. C. Valentine, Highlands. 



26. WYOMING 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1888 

Reorganized December, 1892 

President, Mrs. J. A. Raner, Cheyenne. 
Secretary, Mrs. W. L. Whipple. Cheyenne. 
Treasurer,Mrs. A. E. Kevan, Rock Springs 



30. ARKANSAS, KENTUCKY, AND TEN- 
NESSEE 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION OF THE 
CENTRAL SOUTH ASSOCIATION 

Organized April. 1889 

President, Mrs. Ella S. Moore. Box 3, Fisk Uni- 
versity, Nashville, Tenn. 
Secretary, Miss Mary L. Corpier, Florence, Ala. 
Treasurer, Mrs. Preston Burrus. 815 Cedar St., 

Nashville. 



31. NORTH CAROLINA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1889 

President, Mrs. O. Faduma, Troy. 
Secretary \ 

and VMiss A. E. Farrington, 108 Newbury 
Treasurer, ) St., Portland, Maine 



32. TEXAS 
WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized March, 1890 

President, Mrs. Eunice Heflin, Sherman. 
Secretary, Mrs. Donald Hinkley, Dallas. 
Treasurer, Mrs. A. Geen, Dallas. 



July, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



79 



33. MONTANA 
WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 



38. INDIAN TERRITORY 
WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 



Organized May, 1800 _ ... 

Organized April, 1892 

President, Mrs. V. F. Clark, Livingston. 

Secretary, Mrs. H. J. Miller, Livingston. President, 

Treasurer, Mrs. W. S. Bell, 410 Dearborn Ave., Secretary, Miss Louise Graper, Vinita. 

Helena. Treasurer, Mrs. Raymond, Vinita. 



34. PENNSYLVANIA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized June, 1890 

President, Mrs. C. F. Yennie, Ridgway. 
Secretary, Mrs. C. F. Chamberlain, Cambridge- 

boro. 
Treasztrer, Mrs. W. H. Clift, 386 Walnut St., 

Meadville. 



39. NEVADA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1892 

President, Mrs. L. J. Flint, Reno. 
Secretary, Miss Margaret N. Magill, Reac 
Treasurer, Miss Mary Clow, Reno. 



35. OKLAHOMA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1890 

President, Mrs. J. H. Parker, Kingfisher. 
Secretary, Mrs. Joel Harper, Oklahoma City. 
Treasztrer, Mrs. A. B. Hammer, Oklahoma City. 



36. NEW JERSEY 

Including District of Columbia, Maryland, 
and Virginia 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION OF 
THE NEW JERSEY ASSOCIATION 

Organized March, 1891 

President, Mrs. Isaac Clark, cor. Fourth and Col- 
lege Sts., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Secretary, Miss Julia M. Pond, 607 T St., N. E., 
Washington, D. C. 

Treasurer, Mrs. J. H. Denison, 150 Belleville Ave., 
Newark. 



40. NEW MEXICO 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized November, 1892 

President, Mrs. E. H. Ashmun, Albuquerque. 
Secretary, Mrs. F. A. Burlingame, Albuquerque. 
Treasztrer, Mrs. M. McClaskey, Albuquerque. 



41. BLACK HILLS, SO. DAKOTA 

BLACK HILLS WOMAN'S MISSIONARY 
UNION 

Organized October, 1893 

President, Mrs. J. B. Gossage, Rapid City. 
Secretary, Mrs. C. W. Barron, Rapid City, 
Treasurer, Mrs. E. L. Billings, Lead. 



37. UTAH 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1891 

Reorganized December, 1892 



42. IDAHO 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1895 



President, Mrs. Hemphill. 67 J St., Salt Lake City. 
Secretary, Mrs. L. E. Hall, 78 East First North 

Street, Salt Lake City. President, Mrs. R. B. Wright, Boise. 

Treasurer, Miss Anna Baker, 654 East Third South Secretary, Mrs. C. E. Mason, Mountainhome. 

Street, Salt Lake City. Treasztrer, Mrs. L. H. Johnston, Challis. 



80 The Home Missionary July, 1899 

SECRETARIES OF YOUNG PEOPLE'S WORK 

f Young Ladies' Work, Mrs. B. W. Smith. 600 West Thirty- 
second St., Minneapolis. 

Minnesota ■{ 

I Christian Endeavor Work, Miss Bertha Hanrieman, 521 Ninth 

St., Minneapolis. 

Mass. AND R. I Miss Bertha M. Shepard, 607 Congregational House, Boston. 

Michigan Mrs. W. J. Gregory, 459 Third St., Manistee. 

Kansas Miss Harriet Broad, Topeka. 

OHIO Miss M. C. Smith, 840 Doan St., Cleveland. 

New York Mrs. Geo. R. Haines, 978 Delaware Ave., Buffalo. 

North Dakota Mrs. E. S. Shaw, Cooperstown. 

Oregon Mrs. W. D. Palmer, 443 West Park St., Portland. 

Washington • Mrs. W. C. Davie, 423 North N St., Tacoma. 

South Dakota Mrs. Grace Burleigh, Mitchell. 

Illinois Mrs. J. T. Blanchard, 232 Walnut St., Aurora. 

Missouri Miss H. E. Price, 713 West 28th St., Kansas City. 

Iowa Miss Fannie Spencer, Alden. 

California Miss Caroline A. Potter, 600 Seventeenth St., Oakland, 

Nebraska Mrs. J. N. Hyder, 1520 U St., Lincoln. 

Southern California. . .Miss Phebe Mayhew, 4 Barnard Park, Los Angeles. 

VERMONT Mrs. C. L. Smith, 159 Pine St., Burlington. 

Colorado Mrs. A. D. Blakeslee, 145 South Lincoln St., Denver. 

Montana Mrs. E. E. Esslestyn, Red Lodge. 

SECRETARIES OF CHILDREN'S WORK 

Minnesota Miss Carrie S. Pond, 60S Canada St., St. Paul. 

Michigan Mrs. Geo. Wilson, Detroit. 

Kansas Miss Hattie Booth, Newton. 

Ohio Mrs. O. H. Gates, 257 Elm St., Oberlin. 

North Dakota Mrs. O. J. Wakefield, Wahpeton. 

South Dakota Mrs. I. Grain, Waubay. 

Illinois Mrs. J. A. Thome, 1006 Garfield Blvd., Chicago, 

Nebraska.... Mrs. II. D. Neely, 4371 Hamilton St., Omaha. 

Southern California. ..Miss Emily M. Peck, 920 W. Eighth St.. Los Angeles. 
Montana Rev. Alice S. Barnes, Castle. 



/ 

/ 

iF 'ITT AT o ' 

/ngregational Home Missionary Society 



Field Secretaries 

Rev. W. G. Puddefoot, South Framingham, Mass. 
Rev. C. W. Shelton, Norwalk, Conn. 

Superintendents 

Rev. Moritz E. Eversz, D.D., German Department, 153 La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 
Rev. S. V. S. Fisher, Scandinavian Department, Minneapolis, Minn. 
Rev. Henry A. Schauffler, D.D., Slavic Department, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Edw. D. Curtis, D.D Indianapolis, Ind. Rev. W. H. Thrall Huron, S. Dak. 

_v. S. F. Gale .■ Jacksonville, Fla. Rev. H. Sanderson Denver, Col. 

".ev. Alfred K. Wray, D.D. ... .Kansas City, Mo. Rev. C. T. Brown Salt Lake City, Utah. 

j Rev. L. P. Broad Topeka, Kan. Rev. J. K. Harrison San Francisco, Cal. 

Rev. F. H. Allen Albuquerque, N. M. Rev. John L. Maile Los Angeles, Cal. 

Rev. A. Judson Bailey Seattle, Wash. Rev. C. F. Clapp ..Forest Grove, Ore. 

Rev. Homer W. Carter, D.D Beloit, Wis. R - T w Tr .. T __ t-, t-, I 511 Woodland Terrace, 

v,„ A A V„ nv ™ ■ i Black Hills and Wyoming. Kev. 1. W. Jones, D.JJ. .. } Philadelphia, Pa. 

Rev. A. A. tfROWN... ( Hot SpringS) South Dakota. Rev. W. S. Bell Helena, Mon. 

-Rev. Harmon Bross, D.D Lincoln, Neb. Rev. J. Homer Parker Kingfisher, Okl. 

Rev. S. F. Gale (Act'g Supt. Ala.), Jacksonville, Fla. Rev. A. G. Upton Weiser, Idaho 

Rev. Frank E. Jenkins Atlanta, Ga. Rev. E. H. Ashmun Jerome, Ariz. 

Secretaries and Treasurers 

of the Auxiliaries 

Rev. David P. Hatch, Secretary Maine Missionary Society. . . First Nat. Bk. Bldg., Portland, Me. 

W. P. Hubbard, Esq., Treasurer " " Box 1052, Bangor, Me. 

Rev. A. T. Hillman, Secretary , New Hampshire Home Miss. Society Concord, N. H. 

Hon. Lyman D. Stevens, Treasurer " " " " Concord, N. H. 

Rev. Charles H. Merrill, Secretary Vermont Domestic • " " ... .St. John^tjury, Vt. 

Wm. C. Tyler, Treasurer " .in . . . .St. Johnsbury, Vt. 

Rev. Joshua Coir, Secretary Massachusetts Home " " . . . . I 609 Cong'l House, 

Rev. Edwin B. Palmer, Treasurer " " f Boston, Mass. 

Rev. J. H. Lyon, Secretary Rhode Island " " " Central Falls, R. I. 

Jos. Wm. Rice, Esq., Treasurer " " " " Providence, R. I. 

•Dea. David N. Camp, Secretary Missionary Society of Connecticut Hartford, Conn. 

Ward W. Jacobs, Esq., Treasurer " " ^ " Hartford, Conn. 

Rev. Ethan Curtis, Secretary New York Home Miss. Society ; . . . .Syracuse, N. V. 

William Spalding, Treasurer " " " " Syracuse, N. Y. 

Rev. J. G. Fraser, D.D. , Secretary Ohio " " " Cleveland, Ohio. 

Rev. J. G. Fraser, D.D. , Treasurer " . " " " Cleveland, Ohio. 

Rev. James Tompkins, D.D., Secretary Illinois " ) 153 La Salle St., 

Aaron B. Mead, Esq*., Treasurer " '.'.,} ( _ Chicago, 111. 

Rev. Homer W. Carter, D.D. , Secretary Wisconsin " " " Beloit, Wis. 

C M. Blackman, Esq., Treasurer , " " Whitewater, Wis. 

Rev. T. O. Douglass, D.D., Secretary Iowa Grinnell, Iowa. 

J. H. Merrill, Esq., Treasurer " " " Des Moines, Iowa. 

Rev. William H. Warren, D.D., Secretary. .Michigan Home Miss. Society Lansing, Mich. 

Rev. John P. Sanderson, Treasurer " " " " Lansing, Mich. 

0*eo, H. Morgan, Secretary Cong. City Miss. Society St. Louis, Mo. 

Rev. A. K. Wray, Superintendent " " " " Kansas City, Mo. 

Lewis E. Snow, Treasurer " " " " St. Louis, Mo. 

Communications • 

relating to general business of the Society may be addressed to either of the Secretaries for Correspondence. 
Communications relating to the Editorial Department of The Home Missionary or of the Home Missionary 
section of Congregational Work, may be addressed to Rev. J. B. Clark, D.D. Correspondence of the 
Woman's Department may be addressed to Mrs. H. S. Caswell, Congregational Rooms, New York. 



Donations and Subscriptions 



in Drafts, Checks, Registered Letters, or Post-Office Orders may be addressed to Wm. B. Howland, 
Treasurer, Fourth Avenue and 22d Street, New York. 

A PAYMENT OF $50 CONSTITUTES A LIFE MEMBER 



Form of a Bequest 



I bequeath to my executors the sum of dollars, in trust, to pay over the same, 

in months after my decease, to the person who, when the same is payable, shall act as Treasurer 

of the Congregational Home Missionary Society, formed in the City of New York, in the year eighteen hundred 
and twenty-six, to be applied to the charitable use and purposes of said Society, and under its direction. 



iS 9 9 

Congregational Home Missionary Soci 

Fourth Ave. and 2 2d St., New York 



Major-General Oliver O. Howard 

President 

^ PrtHih*, m- ^ Correspondence 
rreety Hist So c 

Rev. Joseph B. L^ i319 Wainut et 

Rev. Washington Choate, D. 

Mr. William B. Howland. Treasurer 



Executive Committee 
Wm. Ives Washburn, Esq., Chairman 
Asa A. Spear, Esq., Recording Secretary 
Mr. Joseph Wm. Rice 
Rev. Charles H. Richards, D.D. 
Mr. George P. Stockwell 
Rev. John D. Kingsbury, D.D. 
Mr. George W. Hebard 
John H. Perry, Esq. 
Mr. John F. Anderson, Jr. 
Mr. Wm. H. Wanamaker 
Rev. Charles M. Lamson, D.D. 
Mr. Edwin H. Baker 
Rev. Edw. P. Ingersoll, D.D. 
Rev. Howard S. Bliss 
Rev. John. De Peu 

Press of J.J. Little & Co., Astor Place, New York 



JCUBA WESTERN PROSPERITY . MASSACHUSETTS CENTENNIAL 

The 

Home Missionary 

October, 1 899 




The Old Cathedral, Havana, built in 1511, from which the remains of Columbus were 
recently removed to Spain. 

Vol. LXXIL No. 2 

New York 

Congregational Home Missionary Society 
Congregational Rooms, Fourth Ave. and 2 2d St. 

Entered at the Post-Office at New York, N. Y., as Second-Class [Mail] Matter 



Contents for October, 1899 



PAGE 

Editorial Notes 81 

Our Cuban Work in Florida and 
Cuba, by Rev. E. P. Herrick... 85 

Cuba in New York and Brooklyn, by 
Rev. J. M. Lopez-Guillen 89 

Cuban Possibilities, by Rev. A. De 
Barritt ■ 91 

Cuba Ready, by Rev. Horace Porter 93 

The Massachusetts Centennial, by 
Secretary Joshua Coit 95 



Historical Survey, by Dr. Wolcott 
Calkins 9^ 

Western Prosperity and Home Mis- 
sions : . . . io"3 

In Kansas, by Supt. Broad. 

In Nebraska, by Supt. Bross. 

In Indiana, by Supt. Curtis. 

In South Dakota, by Supt. Thrall. 

From Under the Arctic Circle, by 
Rev. Loyal L. Wirt 11; 

A Plea for Missouri, by Rev. A. K. 
Wray, D.D ifi 



The Home Missionary 



Is published quarterly, at thirty cents a year, postage paid. It is sent without charge, on 
request, to be made annually, to Life Members; Missionaries of the Society and its Aux- - 
iliaries ; Ministers securing a yearly collection for it in their congregations ; also to individu- 



als, associations, or congregations, one copy for a year for every len dollars collected and paid 
over to the Society or an Auxiliary. Suitable names should accompany the payment. 
Pastors are earnestly requested to serve Home Missions by promoting the use of this journal 
and "Congregational Work" at the Monthly Conceit and among their people. 

Immediate notice of discontinuance or change of post-office address should be given. 



The Home Missionary 

Vol. LXXII OCTOBER, 1899 No. 2 



EDITORIAL NOTES 

Five months of the fiscal year have passed. The receipts for this time 
show a gain in contributions from the living of $7,809.72 above those of the 

corresponding months of the previous year. They show 
The Treasury, a loss in legacies for the same time of $3,662.76, a net 

gain of $4,146.96. This is encouraging, especially the 
gain in contributions of the living. It is hoped that it indicates a turn in 
the tide, which for a long time has been on the ebb. Let the friends of 
Home Missions maintain the lead they have made, and the close of the 
year will show a handsome balance toward the extinguishment of the 
Society's debt. 

The death of Dr. C. M. Lamson removes from the Executive Com- 
mittee one of the best beloved and most useful of its members. At the 
annual meeting in Hartford three new men were nomi- 
changes in the ot= d h Board and elected b the Society: Mr. 

lice and the Field. J J 

Edwin H. Baker, of Greenwich, Conn., a well-known 
business man standing high in the confidence of the Congregational 
churches ; Dr. Edward P. Ingersoll, late of St. Paul, now of Brooklyn, 
whose pastorates East and West make his connection with the Board one 
of singular value, and Rev. John De Peu, of Bridgeport, Conn., a well- 
known and influential pastor of that State. The vacancy caused by the 
death of Dr. Lamson is yet to be filled. 

The retirement of Rev. J. T. Ford from the superintendency of South- 
ern California, after long and honorable service, has been already noticed. 
Rev. John L. Maile, Superintendent in North Dakota, has been trans- 
ferred from that State, where his health was seriously affected by the 
climate, to Southern California. He has entered with characteristic zeal 
upon his new work, and with greatly improved health. 

Rev. E. H. Ashmun, who has been for some years Superintendent of 
New Mexico and Arizona, has taken the new church at Jerome, Ariz., and 
will act as Superintendent of the Territory in connection with that pas- 



82 The Home Missionary October, 1899 

torate, while Rev. F. H. Allen, pastor at Albuquerque, New Mexico, 
will divide his time between that church and the superintendency of New 
Mexico. These brethren are well qualified for success, and the arrange- 
ment will, we believe, not onl}> increase efficiency, but will serve the 
interests of economy. 

Rev. S. C. McDaniel has retired after a faithful service as Superin- 
tendent of Georgia, and Rev. Frank E. Jenkins, pastor of the Central 
Church, Atlanta, succeeds him as Superintendent in connection with his 
pastorate. Mr. Jenkins has had large experience in the South, yet has all 
the training and sympathies of a Northern man. 

Rev. C. T. Brown, pastor of the First Church, Salt Lake City, has 
been induced to add to his labor as pastor the superintendency of the 
State, while Rev. A. G. Upton, of Weiser, Idaho, is charged with the care 
of that field. Rev. Gregory J. Powell, of Sayville, L. I., whose service as 
general missionary in Northwestern Nebraska is well remembered, has 
been invited to the superintendency of North Dakota in place of Mr. 
Maile, and he has signified his acceptance. 

It is not often that we have so many changes to report at once, but 
they are all necessary and full of hope. 

Many of our Western States have put forth monthly papers devoted 

primarily to churches and missionary interests within their own State. 

They are bright little sheets and serve a most important 

Exchanges. use in the development of church fellowship. The 

Home Missionary has several of these papers already on 
its exchange list and would be gratified to exchange with them all. The 
value of these local sheets cannot be overstated. They contain the fresh- 
est and the latest missionary intelligence, and, their view being limited to 
a single State, they are able to treat these interests with more than ordi- 
nary fulness. It is just such information that the readers of The Home 
Missionary constantly crave, and it will be our effort in the future to 
extract from these local sources what will be of interest to Eastern readers. 

Our Christian Endeavor friends have reason to be grateful for the 

hopeful condition of their mission in Alaska. The young and promising 

church on Douglas Island is fruit of the best kind. Mr. 

Ch /, iSt i an M Endeav ° r Wirt has stood by, as pastor, much beyond the time an- 

Alaska Mission. jti J 

ticipated. Rev. H. Hammond Cole, a successful pastor 
in Arizona and California, succeeds him, of whom the Douglas News says : 
" In our opinion he will more than satisfy our people as an earnest, 
eloquent preacher." Mr. Wirt is thus left free to explore other points 
for Sunday-school and church openings. An interesting letter from him 
in this issue, dated far north, at St. Michael's, will be read with satisfac- 



October, 1899 The Home Missionary 83 

tion, and we hope it may stimulate Christian Endeavor societies to pledge 
themselves anew for this work. In pledges of $10 each they have enabled 
the two societies — the Home Missionary and the Sunday-school societies 
— to carry on the work thus far. The same grant for Alaska — namely, 
$3,000 — has been appropriated for the new year, and responses sent to 
either society will be gratefully received. 

Several States are meditating self-support in the near future. It is 
a good sign and should be encouraged. At the same time it involves so 

much that is serious that continued and careful medita- 
Seif=Support. tion is still eminently in order. When is a State ready 

for self-support? When two conditions are clearly ap- 
parent : First, when the State is able in a natural and unforced way to 
supply its missionary needs without disastrously curtailing its work ; 
secondly, when it is able, if only in some slight degree, to fulfil its obliga- 
tion as an auxiliary to the national society. The latter condition is 
sometimes wholly unconsidered in connection with the question of self- 
support, and thus it happens that a self-supporting State remains, for 
years, an auxiliary only in name. It may well be remembered by a State 
coming into its freedom that other States are still in the bondage of de- 
pendence. They continue to need the help which it has generously 
received for many years, and the sources of such help must be found 
more and more in the newer auxiliaries. Self-support ? Yes, if a State 
can be truly self-supporting, with enough for imperative State demands 
and with a growing surplus for the not less imperative national needs. 

In the paper presented by the Executive Committee at the Hartford 

meeting special attention was called to the alleged phenomenal prosperity 

of several Western States, and the question was raised 

Western Pros- whether under these improved conditions a considerable 

penty. L 

increase in home missionary contributions and pledges 
might not be reasonably expected from the missionary fields. Following 
the Hartford meeting letters of inquiry were sent out from the office to 
the superintendents of several States in the Middle West, covering such 
questions as the following : " What is the prosperity of your State as 
compared with three years ago ? " " Have Congregationalists shared 
equitably in such prosperity?" "By proper and faithful effort can home 
missionary contributions for the current year, as well as pledges of the 
churches for the support of their pastors, be materially increased ? " The 
replies as received and grouped in this issue of the magazine will be read 
with interest, both for the light they throw upon the present condition of 
the West and especially on account of their hopeful view of the growing 
strength of the churches. 



84 The Home Missionary October, 1899 

We propose to open in The Home Missionary a Roll of Honor which 
shall include names of churches coming to self-support. It will be easy 

to make up this roll from the records of the office ; still 
Roil of Honor. we invite all pastors of churches coming to self-support 

during the current year to notify us of the fact by a per- 
sonal letter, and to add to the bare notification any items of special 
interest connected with the transition from dependence to self-support. 
We have the conviction that many a church is more able than it believes 
itself to be, and that it needs not only precept but example, the example 
of churches that have come into their freedom, for its own encourage- 
ment. The function of this magazine is something more than to commu- 
nicate missionary intelligence. Its office is to stimulate, on the one hand, 
the interest of the churches in their work, and on the other hand the 
spirit of self-help on the missionary field. Let the Roll of Honor be a 
long one for the current year. 

A large but not too generous place is given in the current number to 

the Massachusetts Centennial of Home Missions, which formed a special 

feature of the Hartford Anniversary. The statement of 

The Massachusetts s c t r j os h ua Coit is given in full, and the masterly 

Centennial. - J *> J 

' survey and analysis of Dr. Calkins very nearly so. The 
fervid address of Dr. Webb, which treats of the more general aspects of 
the theme, in a most suggestive way, must be reserved for a future num- 
ber. We all believe in Home Missions, but it requires the perspective of 
a hundred years to estimate Home Missions at their true value. The story 
of Connecticut last year and of Massachusetts this year is a most enlight- 
ening demonstration of the meaning and value of the home missionary 
movement. 

Our grateful acknowledgments are due to The Congregationalist and 

The Advance for appreciative notices of the July number of The Home 

Missionary ; also for numerous letters from friends of 

Acknowledgments, the Society and personal friends of our late beloved 

associate, Dr. A. H. Clapp, which accentuate what has 

always been so pleasantly evident, the unique place which this honored 

man has held for many years in the hearts of his brethren, and which, by 

his death, has become a sacred memory. 

Wisconsin is making a determined and hopeful effort to resume mis- 
sionary occupation of the northern district, which for some years has 
been a ward of the national society. The national 
North Wisconsin, grant ceases with October 1st, and from that date it is 
anticipated that the State will assume entire self-support. 
Rev. Dr. Leavitt, President, and Rev. Dr. Carter, Secretary, are giving 



October, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



85 



extra attention to the movement, and the churches are aiming to raise a 
dollar a member as the least amount necessary for success. We heartily 
wish them victory and dare to predict it. 



OUR CUBAN WORK IN FLORIDA AND CUBA 

By Rev. E. P. Herrick 

The vast influx of Cuban immigrants into Tampa and Key West 
during the past ten years has afforded us a rare opportunity to give 
these "children of the Antilles" a pure gospel, to gather the dark- 
eyed children into our Sunday-school and mission school, and to 




THE CUBAN CHURCH, TAMPA, FLORIDA 



86 



The Home Missionary 



October, 1899 



prepare them all for the duties and responsibilities of citizenship over 
there. 

Located in Ibor City, the Fourth Ward of Tampa, is the only Cuban 
Congregational church building in existence. From the tower of this 
Immanuel Church sound forth the notes of the only Cuban Protestant 
bell in the world. This is the property of the " elect " ladies of the 
Florida W. H. M. U., who sustain a school of over 100 pupils, taught by 
Mrs. Julia Ferris. Its sessions are held in the church auditorium for 

lack of school room. 

Rev. and Mrs. E. P. 
Herrick are in charge of 
this work amongst the 
great Cuban population of 
Tampa. Mr. Herrick came 
to Tampa in 1892 as pastor 
of the First Church. He 
could speak Spanish, hav- 
ing been a missionary in 
Mexico. A Sunday-school 
was organized, and for a 
long time it met in a little 
cottage. The classes out- 
grew the seating capacity 
of the room. 

Through the generosity 
of Mr. and Mrs. A. R. Pierce 
of Connecticut the present 
neat and commodious 
chapel was built in 1893. 
The ladies of Florida, 
always interested in the 
Cubans, bought the lot on 
which the chapel stands. 
The chapel has been in constant use, and stands as a concrete expres- 
sion of the interest Congregationalists take in the welfare of the Cubans. 
In 1897 Mr. Herrick gave up his work in the First Church to devote 
himself to Immanuel Church. The growth of the school and church has 
been gratifying. The church, organized in 1897, received in 1898 acces- 
sions on confession of faith of eighty-seven. 

The present membership is 119, of which over fifty have returned to 
Cuba, forty residing in Havana. 

Our Sunday-school enrplls over 130 pupils, and is one of the strong- 
holds of our work amongst these "strangers within the gates." The 




P. HERRICK, SUPERINTENDENT OF CUBAN 
WORK IN FLORIDA AND CUBA 



October, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



37 



Lord's Supper is celebrated monthly. A weekly sewing-school is kept up. 
Both mothers' and missionary meetings are regularly held with much of 
interest and profit. 

The mid-week prayer meeting is well attended. Last week (mid- 
August), with the thermometer at 94, we had an attendance of twenty- 
eight. 

The mothers are a sad-eyed race. So many are weakened by poor 
food and mental suffering. We are 
constantly carrying on relief work — 
distributing clothing and food, as well 
as visiting their homes to take to them 
the bread of life. 

The Immanuel Mission, sustained 
by the Home Missionary Society, re- 
joices in all that has been accomplished 
through its agency. Hundreds of 
children have been taught in its 
schools. Hundreds have heard the 
Gospel preached within its walls. 

Who can tell what the harvest of 
all this seed sowing, stretching 
through seven years, is to be ? The 
mission has been weakened by re- 
movals, but is cheered by fresh acces- 
sions. We have over fifty members 
left. 

Generous and constant have our 
donations of members been to the 
larger work over in Cuba to which so 
many are going. May the departing 
exiles prove to be light-bearers to 
their people, who so sadly need in- 
struction in gospel truth ! 

Yea, even if Immanuel Church 
should die (which I do not anticipate) 

it dies as the grain of wheat, to reappear in the hundredfold increase of 
the resurrection over yonder. 

Tired of the rule of bigotry and cruel oppression, weary of the minis- 
trations of a mercenary and corrupt priesthood, longing for a Christianity 
that is Christian, the Cuban is ready for the best we have to offer. 

With their love of liberty, our church presents many attractions, and a 
hearty welcome was accorded in three provinces last winter to the two 
brethren sent by the C. H. M. S. to study the situation and report. 




YOUNGEST MEMBER OF THE 
TAMPA CUBAN CHURCH 



$s 



The Home Missionary 



October, 1899 




CUHA.X CHILDREN, TAMPA, FLORIDA. INTERIOR OF CUBAN CHURCH 

God's design in the Tampa work is evident. That work should be sus- 
tained, for while the tariff remains Tampa will have a large Cuban popu- 
lation. Tampa furnishes a base from which to work for the evangeliza- 
tion of Cuba. 

What is the climax, the natural culmination and fruitage, of all this 




CUBAN GROUP. SEWING-SCHOOL GIRLS, HAVANA 



October, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



89 



work, stretching over seven years, but the carrying of it over into Cuba ? 
The spiritual campaigns are already being carried on. 

We are attempting to enter Cuba and possess it in Christ's name, 
rearing the fair superstructure of a pure biblical faith on the ruins of a 
vicious and decadent civilization. We have been attempting to save the 
Cubans in Florida to save the greater number in Cuba. 

The " Pearl of the Western Seas," transformed, redeemed, trans- 
figured, shall yet be swayed by truly Christian facts and forces. May 
our great fraternity of churches have its place in the militant host yonder 
pressing on to victory ! God calls us all to aid in the spiritual re-creation 
of this beautiful island of the sea. 



CUBA IN NEW YORK AND BROOKLYN 



By Rev. J. M. Lopez-Guillen, Pastor 



The Hispano-American Church of New York and Brooklyn was 
organized the' 13th of November, 1892. Through the kindness of Dr. 
Virgin and his people we 
met first in the main body 
of their church, as a Sunday- 
school forming part of the 
Pilgrim Church Sunday- 
school ; but the members 
having increased up to the 
number of seventy-six, and 
the lives and faith of our 
people being warrant enough 
_ for us to organize a church, 
we did so with Dr. Virgin's 
help, beginning our new life 
as a Christian body with 
fifty-five active members. 
Up to the present time we 
have received 112 members ; 
three by letter, and the rest 
by public confession of their 
faith ; have baptized twenty- 
seven, and twenty-six have 
asked us to solemnize their REV j M LOPEZ) pastor cuban church, new 
vows of matrimony. Our york city 




go 



The Home Missionary 



October, i< 



Church was recognized and the present 
pastor installed by Council of the Congre- 
gational Churches on the 6th of last Decem- 
ber. And last spring we were received 
into the Manhattan-Brooklyn Conference 
of Churches. 

A deacon of our church, Dr. J. M. 
Fernandez, went back to his home at 
Bolondron, Cuba. This brother had given 
us proofs of his stanch faith and thorough 
conversion while with us : he visited the 
sick not only as an M.D. , but also as a 
deacon ; held meetings for us and super- 
intended our Sunday-school, and we were 
greatly rejoiced to hear our brother Dr. 
Kingsbury speak of the grand work he 
found had been done at Bolondron by Dr. 
Fernandez, and of the royal welcome ex- 
tended to him on his arrival there. Dr. Fernandez has a Sunday-school 




DR. J. M. FERNANDEZ 







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SPANISH AND CUBAN GIRLS AT- MRS. SELDEN'S HOME, BROOKLYN 



October, 1899 The Home Missionary 91 

meeting in his own house every Sunday, and Dr. Kinsgbury preached 
the Gospel while there to an audience of two hundred persons. 

We hear of another member of our church doing the same kind of 
work at Remedios. If without help of any kind from our Board these 
brethren have done such a good work for Christ, how much more are we 
entitled to expect when our organized forces take possession of such a 
fruitful field ? 

It is now thirteen years since Mrs. C. M. Strong Selden began alone 
the house-to-house visitation in New York among the Spanish-speaking 
people. From it has grown this home training-school, and indeed we 
must say all this Christian work. Mrs. Selden's school has always been 
the nucleus of our church; many of the young girls have joined our 
membership, confessing their faith before their parents and friends, and 
thus leading them to Christ. 

The group published with this article is a fair specimen of the girls in 
our home "; intelligent, serious, and responsive, they are a great encourage- 
ment in our work. Five of the oldest girls are already doing missionary 
work, reading the Bible and kneeling in prayer with adults in house-to- 
house visitation. The school last winter has numbered, with its care- 
takers, forty-five. Besides the girls, we have eight young boys who had 
to be taken care of, and if funds are forthcoming we will have as big a 
training-school for boys as for girls, judging by the applications. What a 
promise for Cuba if we could be preparing boys by a Christian education 
to become Christian men in Cuba ! 

We have to thank Dr. Virgin and Dr. Meredith for the special kind- 
ness and love shown in a thousand ways, and the Home Missionary 
Society and our pastors in Greater New York for their tireless encourage- 
ment extended to us in our work all these years. 



CUBAN POSSIBILITIES 

By Rev. A. De Barritt, Havana 

It is not surprising that the Congregational Church has decided to share 
the responsibility of taking to Cuba the good news of the Gospel. The 
influence of Congregationalism in shaping the destinies of our own country 
is recognized by most people, and the work that God has enabled our 
church to do in other lands is just the kind of effort that we need in Cuba 
to-day. 

Some persons profess to have been disappointed in Cuba and the 
Cubans, but I must confess that I have not experienced such disappoint- 



92 The Home Missionary October, 1899 

ment. Knowing the Spanish character, realizing something of what the 
influence of the clergy had been in Cuba, and knowing that for many 
years war had been conducted in this island, I felt that little could be ex- 
pected, and I have found things and people much better than I thought. 

What impresses me is the possibility of Cubans. Last week I married 
an American to a Cuban young lady. Only a few months ago this girl 
lived with her poor mother in one of the poorest huts of the place. Some- 
times hungry, very poorly dressed, with no prospect in life, one would 
have voted her one of the disappointing cases. But love and effort have 
wrought a great change in a very little time. The American boy who 
loved this Cuban girl found it no easy task to win her. In this country 
divorce is practically unknown and the Cubans have heard that in America 
a man will put away his wife and marry another. So the mother was 
anxious to know the truth about the matter. And many of the Americans 
whom the mother has seen have not been of the stamp she expected from 
American people, so for many months our boy from America had to 
wait and watch, until at last the battle was won and he claimed the prize. 
But what a difference in a few months ! Who, to look at this girl, presid- 
ing over the household with grace and tact, devoted to her American hus- 
band, would recognize the Cuban girl of the little hut six months ago ? 
More wonderful transformations than this have been seen. 

The sword has wonderfully opened up the way for the preaching of the 
Gospel, but something more is needed if the church of God is to enjoy the 
rights that American statesmen have given. Imagine the Government of 
America with an office in some back street, while the Spanish Government 
had a large and imposing building on the principal street. Not all the 
proclamations in the world would convince the Cubans that something was 
not wrong, and that after all the American nation was not the powerful 
and beneficent agent they had understood. As soon as possible Protestant- 
ism, and, I trust, Congregationalism, will be represented in this city as it 
is worthy to be represented ; then, and not until then, can true good 
work be done. 

A great deal of money is being spent in Cuba to-day, and a large por- 
tion is being given by Christian people to societies outside the church, and 
some of them are doing good work. Of others, the least said the better. 

I should like to see $100,000 donated to Cuba, to be spent in giving 
work to the unemployed, and while our government is building good roads 
let the church of God put up some decent buildings. It would mean that 
thousands of Cubans would join the church of Christ, and many a man 
might make his memory revered by providing a church home for the 
thousands outside the Catholic Church. 

Mothers of Cuba wish to send their children to Protestant schools. My 
school has been closed for lack of $40 per month to pay the rent. Fathers 



October, 1899 The Home Missionary 93 

desire to come to the house of God and send their families with confidence. 
Shall we grant their desire and answer our prayers by generous giving to 
make Christian worship possible ? 

What has surprised me has been the number of persons who have come 
to the church of Christ, and who, in their own homes, with the Bible as 
their guide, have found a living, loving, saving Christ. And these people 
wish to send their children to a Protestant school, of course ! I have 
travelled in many countries and seen opportunities in many lands, but have 
never seen a country so ripe for Christian work as the Cuba of to-day. 

Unless the Gospel is preached to this people and they are gathered in 
Christian churches, I shall view the future with apprehension. 

Thousands outside the church will never enter the doors of the Roman 
Catholic church. They have their own reasons, many of them, I know, and 
they are quite right in so deciding. Thousands now in the church are 
restless and desire the truth ; but if the truth is withheld, then the responsi- 
bility will be ours and the loss theirs. 

In conclusion, let me point out how every church can assist. Clothes 
are needed for the children, and no one gets to know real needs as a man 
who visits among the people day by day. School books, charts, black- 
boards, copy books, etc. , etc., for the children, and especially Spanish Bibles. 
Salaries must be paid and the rents of buildings must be met. Churches 
must be built, and my earnest prayer is that the generosity of our people 
will make it possible for our societies to assist Cuba, and that the name of 
our God may be glorified through the kindness of our brethren in North 
America. A little girl who saw me give a ticket for food to her hungry 
father kissed my hand as she left me. Brethren, the gratitude of these 
dear people and the favor of God are worth an effort. 



CUBA READY 

By Rev. Horace Porter, Assistant Pastor of Plymouth Church, 

Brooklyn 

The Cubans are a nobler people than is commonly believed. Our 
soldier boys saw the Cubans in Santiago. They were poor, filthy, almost 
starved. Some of the soldier boys came home and said that " had they 
known for whom they were fighting, the}' would never have gone to the 
war." 

But our soldier boys ought to consider that they saw the Cubans 
under conditions of utter desolation. They saw the Cuban soldier a poor, 
worn-out mortal, half-starved, and covered with boils and sores produced 



94 The Home Missionary October, 1899 

by years of exposure in the poisonous underbrush of Cuban jungles. 
Given about one half of a fair chance, the Cubans prove themselves to be 
willing workers, glad to be self-reliant. 

Some authorities say that but one in forty of the native Cubans can 
read and write. Nothing short of the United States census, now being 
taken, can supply the facts in this regard. 

Religiously, Cuba is in almost as sad a plight as she has been politi- 
cally and industrially. The Church in Cuba is in reality the Spanish 
Roman Catholic Church. State support has been withdrawn from the 
church. In a recent interview in the Outlook, Archbishop Ireland says 
that the Roman Catholic Church is in "absolute control in Cuba." Evi- 
dently. It has been for four hundred years. Great has been that 
church's opportunity in Cuba. Great her responsibility. Terrible her 
failure to meet that responsibility. I do not regard the Roman Catholic 
Church in the United States as a failure — not by any means. But I do 
so regard it in Cuba. Under her, the people are in gross ignorance. 
She has hardly restrained vice, but, I fear, has rather fostered vicious 
habits. The priests have charged so exorbitantly to perform the mar- 
riage rite as to have made marriage almost impossible among the poor. 
Evil, indeed, has been the consequence among the Cubans. 

The Romish Church has, after four hundred years, hardly at all over- 
come that duplicity of mind which marks the Spanish character. It has 
practically refused to permit native Cubans to be priests to their own 
people. It has forced upon Cuba a foreign priesthood, unsympathetic, 
tyrannical, and often vicious. It has so outraged the Cuban spirit of 
freedom as practically to have lost the allegiance of the men of Cuba. 
The Catholic Church in Cuba has for generations championed Spanish 
misrule there, even helping to make Weylerism possible. 

Archbishop Ireland, in the interview above referred to, regards 
Protestantism as a " partial and fragmentary Christianity." He objects 
to Protestant advances in Cuba. Yes, our Protestantism is not perfect. 
But I submit to Archbishop Ireland that, after four hundred years " in 
absolute control," the Spanish Roman Catholic Christianity has been so 
partial and fragmentary that even the parts and fragments of a pure 
Christianity can hardly be found in Cuba. 

Therefore I regard Cuba as a legitimate field for the preaching of the 
Gospel according to our Protestant conception of it, that it may rightly 
be offered to that people for their acceptance or rejection according as it 
may or may not appeal to them. 

While in Havana I called on Mr. De Barritt, the newly appointed mis- 
sionary of this Society. He is specially adapted, I should judge by his 
knowledge of Spanish and his love of teaching, to couple the work of 
instruction with his missionary service. The people are eager to learn 



October, i! 



The Home Missionary 



95 



English and to gain some "American learning." Our Protestant Church 
may rightly carry to them the religion and the learning for which we 
stand in America. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS CENTENNIAL 

ADDRESS OF SECRETARY JOSHUA CO IT AT HARTFORD 

The Massachusetts Home Missionary Society, ioo years old next 
Monday (May 29th), is glad to give centennial greeting to its mother, 
shall I say ? No, not exactly ; for this society was twenty-seven years old 
when the Congregational Home Missionary Society was formed. Well, 
then, to its child, for we were one of its parents, so to speak. When the 
West grew beyond the wise care of the several State societies the National 
Society was formed, and has had a 
most illustrious history, and is the 
mother, if not of the Massachusetts 
or Connecticut societies, yet of many 
others. We are specially pleased to 
give this greeting in Connecticut, the 
home of our elder sister, who made 
her century run a year ago. 

When Nathaniel Emmons, Sam- 
uel Niles, Samuel Spring, Freegrace 
Reynolds, Calvin Park, Leonard 
Woods, and. thirty-three others 
formed a society " to collect and 
combine their efforts for the spread 
of the knowledge of the glorious 
Gospel of Christ among the poor 
heathens, and in remote parts of our 
country," they could have had no 
belief and very little hope that their 
society would prove to be so great a 
power as under God's favor it has 

become. The country has grown in these hundred years beyond all ex- 
pectation, and has not yet reached full maturity, though it has stretched 
from sea to sea — there are islands beyond. Its population has increased, 
yes, multiplied from 5,000,000 to 75,000,000 — fifteen folded. This society 
has much more than kept pace with its field — the whole country. Its 
receipts, which the first year were $1,000, were this last year more v than 
$100,000. Taking decades, we find that the first decade brought $15,000 




REV. JOSHUA COIT, SECRETARY OF THE 
MASSACHUSETTS HOME MISSIONARY 
SOCIETY 



96 The Home Missionary October, 1899 

to its treasury, the last nearly $1,500,000 ($1,422,653.60) — ninety-five 
folded. 

Of the total receipts for Home Missions in Massachusetts in 100 years 
($6,167,390) $4,500,000 has gone through the national treasury since 
1826 (rather more than a quarter of its total receipts), before that, direct, 
to the great work in the West ; $1,500,000 has been spent in Massa- 
chusetts — $3 for the West, $1 at home. 

What the $3 have done in building up Christian commonwealths all 
over our land it is impossible to trace in detail. Yet we may safely say 
that planting the institutions of the Gospel in new settlements and main- 
taining them in the older places, ever keeping abreast of the advancing 
wave of population, and never forsaking the poor church because it was 
poor, the National Society has been a large factor in molding, yes, in 
creating, the moral character of these United States. 

Of the work in our own State it may be said that of the 601 churches 
Massachusetts counts to-day, 323 have been on the list of our beneficiaries, 
some for one year only, some for seventy years. And it is hard to say in 
which cases the most good has been dene. The help at the start for a 
year gave an impetus felt, though not always recognized, in all the future 
years to some of our strongest churches. The continued help for fifty 
years or more has kept the public ministrations of the Gospel alive in 
many a country town from which young men and maidens have gone 
forth to be a power in the land for righteousness. If the list could be 
secured of the leaders in church and State that have had the seeds of 
Christian character implanted in their souls in our country churches and 
Sunday-schools that list would astonish the world. Again, if we could 
cull out of that list the men of large wealth and tithe them, our treasury, 
and consequently the treasury of the National Society, would perpetually 
overflow. 

The field of our society is, as I said, the whole country. Our own 
Commonwealth, the part of the field for which we are primarily responsible, 
has been in these 100 years so constantly changing that demand for home 
missionary work has greatly increased The constant tide from country 
to city has weakened country churches so that the number needing 
assistance has increased from time to time. That tide has, however, now 
reached its height and begun to ebb. But there has come a more serious 
change in the conditions of the old Bay State, a change which has com- 
pelled this to become a Foreign Home Missionary Society. More than 
half of our population is to-day foreign born or children of foreign born. 
If you examine the "Statistical Atlas of the United States" you will find 
that forty-two per cent, of the population of Massachusetts is " native 
white of native parents," while twenty-eight per cent, is "foreign born" 
and twenty-eight per cent, is "children of foreign born." The remaining 



! October, 1899 The Home Missionary 97 

two per cent, is "colored." Again, you will find in this atlas a page of 
circles, each circle divided by segments of different colors. Each seg- 
ment indicates the proportion of communicants in the various churches. 
There is a circle for each State. Now, in the Massachusetts circle the 
Roman Catholic segment is very large, more than half, nearly five-eighths 
of the whole. It is larger than in any other State or Territory, except 
Arizona, Montana, Nevada, and Rhode Island. The foreign immigration 
is not now localized in cities and manufacturing towns so much as 
formerly. Not long ago I was in a farming town six miles from a rail- 
road, population 599. The assessors' list of persons taxed numbered 237 
names. Of these forty-one were names of foreigners — names of Austrians, 
Bulgarians, English, Hungarians, French, Irish, Norwegians, Poles, Rus- 
sians, Scotch' and Swedes — eleven nationalities represented There is no 
reason to suppose that this is an exceptional case. This mass of foreigners, 
so great and so widely scattered, opened before our society a new field. 
Fortunately we were enabled by a large legacy to enter upon it. So we 
have established foreign home missions among some nine nationalities — 
Armenian, Finn, French, German, Greek, Italian, Norwegian, Pole, and 
Swede. And there are others, Svrians and Portuguese for instance, among 
whom we might well labor. The foreign work is of varied character. It 
is not all among Roman Catholics. The Scandinavians are not Romanists, 
nor the Armenians or Greeks. But it is all very important. For the future 
well-being of our State, if for no higher reason, it must be carried on. In 
God's providence these people have come among us, and whatever civil 
or social problems may be raised about them or among them the religious 
duty is plain. The Gospel must be preached to them in their own mother 
tongue in which they were born. No other speech, however well intended, 
can so touch their hearts or win their lives to the Lord Christ. 

This, then, has been the work of our churches through this society for 
100 years, to preach the Gospel of Jesus Christ throughout our land, 
beginning at Jerusalem. Our society begins its new century with full 
purpose of heart and mind that all our people shall hear and know the 
joyful sound. 

This brief sketch will serve to introduce those who will now address 
you on the history and results of our 100 years. 



HISTORICAL SURVEY 

ADDRESS OF WOLCOTT CALKINS, D.D., AT HARTFORD 

The Massachusetts Missionary Society was born the year George 
Washington died, and no other event in that closing period of the eigh- 



98 The Home Missionary .October, 1899 

teenth century had a greater influence in making perpetual the principles 
of the Father of his country. It was the momentous year 1799, when 
Napoleon, fighting his way through the coalition of England, Russia, 
Germany, Austria, Italy, and Turkey, reached Paris, and by his coups d'etat 
founded the First Empire. His brilliant victories were destined to enlarge 
vastly the domains of the United States. For in 1803, to maintain his 
armies, he was forced to sell for fifteen million dollars the French posses- 
sions on this continent, embracing the present area between the Missis- 
sippi and the Rocky Mountains north of the boundary of Mexico, and all 
claims to Florida, Mississippi, Alabama, and Texas. Our national terri- 
tory was more than doubled. Who was to be responsible for the moral and 
spiritual interests of this unknown and expanding domain? The Massa- 
chusetts Missionary Society, with prophetic eye upon these swiftly 
approaching events, sent one of its first missionaries to New Orleans, the 
radiating point of the Louisiana Purchase. 

It was a national society for more than a quarter of a century. It 
started out to be also a foreign missionary society : " to diffuse the 
knowledge of the Gospel among the heathens." It trained Mills, of the 
hay-stack prayer-meeting, and Adoniram Judson for their foreign work, 
and in 1S10 it gave its greatest men and begged for the funds to found 
the American Board, and it continued for sixteen years longer to expend 
all its funds and to send all its men to the " remote parts of this country 
where Christ is seldom or never preached," namely, to New Hampshire, 
Vermont, Maine, and to the far West on the Genesee River in New York. 
They had no commission to churches already in existence, but went as 
itinerant evangelists to preach and found churches among farmers and 
lumbermen on the frontiers. They were not to ask and were forbidden 
to accept anything but hospitality from the people. 

Hand in hand with the Connecticut Missionary Society it continued 
this general work until 1826, when the American Home Missionary 
Society was organized, largely out of the experience, the zeal, and the 
trained men of those two New England agencies. 

It is pathetic to look back from our times of debts in missionary 
treasuries, and of unemployed ministers by hundreds in every denomina- 
tion, and see what were the real difficulties of the Massachusetts Mis- 
sionary Society in the beginning. They had plenty of money ; the 
thirty-nine founders laid down two dollars each as an annual subscription 
before they began to talk. One of their officers accepted the honor of 
his election with a thank-offering of ten dollars extra. Godly women 
surprised them with a gift of fifty dollars. In a year they had $1,045.08 
in their treasury, and they could not find a man to go for them ! Every 
minister in Massachusetts had a church which would not release him even 
for a few months. The executive committee offered to supply the 



October, 1899 The Home Missionary 99 

churches and to pay their pastors fifty cents a day extra ; they offered to 
send candidates for the ministry as missionary companions at a dollar a 
day. It was more than a year before they could secure their first 
volunteers for this wide field ripe for the harvest, and it was not till 1839 
that they announced : " We have all the missionaries we need." (Report 
of 1839, p. 7.) 

Why was it that both the Connecticut and the Massachusetts mission- 
ary societies sent all their men to remote places at first, and kept not 
their own vineyards ? In these two commonwealths at least there was no 
such " rural problem " as that which confronts us to-day. The emigra- 
tion to western New York and to the Western Reserve in Ohio had 
begun, but it had not yet broken up New England homes. Those were 
the golden days of country life to which we look back with fondness. 
We read, its delineation in the fascinating pages of the author whose pen 
guided the sword to the defence of the country from slavery, and then 
found solace from the awful conflict by describing her own home in 
Litchfield, so as to make it the faithful portrayal of every godly household 
in New England. The Home and the Church were then the foci of the 
ellipse enclosing the whole of life. There were no railroads and tele- 
graphs to make a farming community with its central village an out-station 
of a devouring city. The daily newspaper did not distract attention to 
the wide world. The academy and the college were boundaries to youth- 
ful ambition. Country life maintained an easy supremacy in moral and 
spiritual forces. Out of every thousand ministers in the whole nation 
more than half would come from towns of less than 2,000 citizens, and 
not more than a hundred from the vastly greater population of cities of 
over 20,000. . Judges, senators, and Presidents were country-bred men 
in enormous majorities. 

There were also special influences at work in the early years of our 
century to purify and invigorate the churches of Massachusetts. We can 
afford to waive the question about the justice of those legal decisions 
which left the meeting-houses of the Pilgrim Church in Plymouth, of the 
first churches in Boston and in Cambridge, and some score of others, in 
the possession of those who no longer believed and preached the doctrines 
of the early New England fathers. For the fact is now transparent that 
this disaster was the greatest blessing the orthodox churches ever received. 
It came just as the reaction against the half-way covenant was complete. 
It was the exact impulse needed for a revival of the spirit of sacrifice. It 
rescued great city churches, like the one with which we are assembled 
to-day, from apathy and formalism. It saved the country churches of 
Massachusetts from Cape to hillside, and it trained the men in reinvig- 
orated churches, scattered all over the Commonwealth, for the aggressive 
work of missions in remote regions. 



ioo The Home Missionary October, 1899 

And yet it was discovered in less than twenty years that emigration 
and declining prices of agricultural products were beginning to affect the 
prosperous churches in the country. In 1818 a canvass was made which 
revealed, to the consternation of the General Association, that fifty 
churches were rapidly declining and forty of them were nigh unto perish- 
ing. Not a dollar nor a man could be sent to them without forfeiting 
the charter of the Massachusetts Missionary Society, and a new organiza- 
tion was instantly formed for their relief. It worked harmoniously with 
us for nine years. In 1826 we united with the Connecticut and other 
societies to form the American Home Missionary Society, and have con- 
tinued ever since as its auxiliary, contributing to its treasury the larger 
portion of our funds, varying from four-fifths to two-thirds, for missions 
in the great West. This part of our history is your history, and needs no 
recapitulation here. 

What of our history for the eighty-one years, as the Domestic Mis- 
sionary Society from 1818 till 1827, and since that date as the genuine 
Massachusetts Home Missionary Society, though it did not acquire this 
charter name until 1844 ? It is this beautiful history of our missionary 
work within the bounds of Massachusetts which you have a right to 
demand of us on this centennial anniversary. 

It comes just as the eyes of all the people are looking with amazement, 
and with some suspicion, at New England. What if Governor Rollins had 
in the archives, at Concord, official records substantiating the facts recited 
in his recent proclamation ? The editors and correspondents who have 
protested that his description of rural communities in New Hampshire is 
a caricature would have been forced to admit this much : the Governor 
knows what he is talking about. No doubt he does, as it is. But we feel 
bound to tell you, after the controversy which has raged over his solemn 
words, that we know what we are talking about, and we can verify every 
word we say. We have had an executive committee all through the 
century with eyes wide open to these solemn interests ; they felt the need 
of a paid agent as early as 1821, and could not find their man. They laid 
hands on one in 1824 and he would not accept. It was not until 1840 
that a minister of the Gospel was found willing to leave his pulpit and 
devote all his time to the more delicate and arduous task of weighing the 
claims of feeble churches, visiting them and telling the story of their 
struggles to the strong churches, and making the study of the "rural 
problem " the business of his life. For fifty-nine years eminent men have 
been our unmitred bishops in this heavenly work, and it is safe to say that 
every one of them has known more about this tremendous question than 
all the governors of our States put together. They have personally in- 
spected every village and farming region, talked with the people, and 
looked at facts with their own eyes. They have had confidential corre- 



October, 1899 The Home Missionary 101 

spondents in all the churches. And the missionary churches have had 
college-bred men in their pulpits. There were no short cuts to the min- 
istry in the forties and fifties. Bible schools and lay colleges had not 
trained our men ; our secretaries have always been able to lay hands on 
picked men for our feeble churches. They all know what good preach- 
ing is. They have no bishop or presiding elder to appoint their pastors ; 
they choose for themselves, but if they choose a man who is not a thoroughly 
trained and ordained Congregational minister, they pay his salary with- 
out a dollar from our treasury. This inflexible rule has made our archives 
the deposit of correspondence and memoranda from the most intelligent 
observers all over the Cape during the whole of the period of its declin- 
ing industries in shipping and fisheries, all over the hill counties during 
the failures of agriculture, in all the manufacturing centers created by 
water and steam power, and close to all the great cities. And what can- 
not be found out by searching this voluminous literature would hardly 
make a footnote in the moral and spiritual history of Massachusetts. 

What are the actual facts ? In 18 18 there were forty destitute towns 
in Massachusetts where worship could not be sustained without assistance. 
The number mounted to fifty in 1828, varied from sixty to seventy during 
the next ten years, fell back again to less than sixty during the forties; so 
in our first half-century, up to 1849, we gave relief to churches for a year 
or two when they were in straits and took others when their turn came for 
hard times, and thus entered 183 missionary fields. In most cases they 
were either moral wastes when we began, or else neglected corners in the 
Lord's vineyard, and all but twelve of them were living churches at the 
end of the period. The twelve were either such feeble missions that no 
attempt could be made to organize churches, or else they were old 
churches in decrepitude, which were absorbed by more vigorous churches 
of other evangelical denominations. All the rest were alive : 171 churches, 
two-fifths of the orthodox Congregational churches in Massachusetts, 
with 15,000 members, and with over 100 new meeting-houses. Fifty-five of 
them were still dependent, but 116 of our missionary churches had created 
such improved moral conditions in their neighborhood that they were 
loyally and liberally supported by their own parishes, and all but a few 
of the rest were rapidly approaching independence. On the average, it 
took only six years and a half, and only $108 a year of outside help, to 
hearten a discouraged church, and to enlist the help of the surrounding 
community in sustaining a vigorous church of their own. 

The brightest years- of this first half-century were the forties. The 
policy of the society not to send itinerant evangelists nor to organize 
churches, but to help churches which had organized themselves in the 
good old Congregational way, had been deliberately adopted, and a won- 
derful discovery had been made : how to give relief without pauperizing 



102 The Home Missionary October, 1899 

the recipient. Our modern charity organizations are setting forth, as 
original, principles which were formulated, modified by experiment, and 
perfected by successful operation in this society long before sociology 
aspired to the dignity of a science ! 

Not a dollar for a church that would do nothing for its own support ! 
This was our inflexible principle. It was not held without challenge : 
"The church will die ! " The stern reply went back, "Why should Paul 
and Christ himself die for the truth, and a little church be afraid to die 
for Christ? Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord." How much 
must the church do for itself to be worth keeping alive by missionary 
funds ? The men who wrestled with this problem tabulated their com- 
putations, and after years of trial laid down their rule ; if they could come 
back and compete in our civil service examinations they would leave no 
place for graduates from Yale and Harvard and schools of technology. 
One per cent, of the assessors' valuation of all property represented in the 
parish : how much would that bring during 1899 into the treasury of the 
Old South Church in Boston ? That has been the rule. In exceptional 
cases two-thirds or one-half of one per cent, has been the portion. More 
often it has reached two, and sometimes five per cent., and only in the case 
of new enterprises promising speedy self-support and reimbursement, or 
else of churches continually depleted by removals, have the grants from 
our treasury exceeded the amount contributed by the assisted churches. 

This policy of helping those only who help themselves has had some 
surprising results. It is impossible to enumerate the strong churches in 
Massachusetts which have reached independence inside of three years. 
If we include Roxbury, Leominster, Gloucester, Waltham, Watertown, 
Concord, Fall River, Chelsea, and the great church with its greater 
preacher facing Harvard University, we could find during 100 years ten 
churches once fostered by us and now averaging over 450 members, and 
twenty-five lacking only one of an average membership of 200. Now, 
suppose we should add up the contributions of these strong churches for 
missions, for benevolence, for their own expenses and for the meeting- 
houses they have built ; and suppose we should figure the grand total out 
as income from our investment in these churches, and begin to blow 
trumpets right here in Hartford about 100 per cent, annual dividends ! 
We shall do nothing of the sort. We will go back to 1850. Then we 
did figure the thing out, not to blow trumpets, but to test our policy. 
And we did not put down a dollar given for their own expenses and 
meeting-houses, but added up only the contributions for missions and 
benevolence, of all the churches we had ever assisted, and found the 
amount to be 12 per cent, a year of all the money we had invested in 
them for fifty years. In common with banks and corporations and public 
treasuries, we have suffered from defalcation, but this is an investment 






October, 1899 The Home Missionary 103 

which is safe. Worthless vouchers involved a loss of $75,000 in 1879. 
We confessed our neglect with shame, but we are not ashamed of the Gospel 
of Christ capitalized in living churches and we challenge Wall Street to 
match our dividends, even in mere cash. 

Now we return to the main question : the moral and spiritual forces 
of our agency in resistance to the decay of religion and in sustaining the 
best interests of the Commonwealth. There have been frequent and sur- 
prising changes in moral conditions. Up to 1840 the churches had not 
been enfeebled so much by emigration as by indifference, intemperance, 
infidelity, and prevailing vices. Dishonesty was becoming scandalous. 
Puritan families needed locks on their barns and corn-cribs. Atheists 
and deists abounded. One place within the Old Colony where no set- 
tled minister had labored for years had become a moral waste, and many 
families were sinking into heathenish degeneration. 

These were the days of isms in Massachusetts, Universalism lost its 
terror, there were so many a great deal worse. In 1843 Millerism be- 
gins to be alarming, and one report closes : The world has not come to 
an end and the church is alive. Then Perfectionism had its day. One 
deacon and half a dozen members of the church walked fifteen miles to 
hear a ranter describe the freedom gained by instantaneous sanctification, 
and came back to make hay on Sundays and to spend prayer-meeting 
evenings in the bar-room. Unionism got under great headway ; no sect, 
no creed, no such names as Baptist, Methodist, or Congregationalist, nothing 
but just the church of Christ, and in 1843 no church was left in that place. 
Mormonism actually gained a foothold, and would have carried silly women 
away had not a learned minister been on the ground to demolish it with a 
single course of lectures. 

The history of the Washingtonian temperance movement could be 
written with no other documents for dates and facts. The reformed ine- 
briates took possession of the meeting-houses like another army of iron- 
sides, without asking permission. One minister who had some scruples 
referred to a vote of the church after the morning service this notice 
which had been put in his hands on the steps : " Six reformed drunkards 
will hold a meeting in this house at three o'clock this afternoon." There 
was a long pause, when a venerable deacon rose in the back of the room, 
and said, with his hand to his ear : " I'm a little hard of hearing ; how 
many drunkards did you say were coming ? " 

But they were generally welcome. Ministers and churches threw 
themselves into this movement with fervor. The reports figure " fifty- 
four church members and 149 signers of the pledge," until they give up 
counting and report all the women, all the children and all the men but 
one as teetotalers. " The only tavern in the town has become a Wash- 
ingtonian, and its landlord is our best helper/' 



104 The Home Missionary October, 1899 

You could also write the history of revivals in Massachusetts from 
these reports. In the early forties, again after 1857, and at other less 
signal intervals, they appear with wonderful blessings. Scattered over the 
mountain in a town of only thirty voters is a church of 122 members, 
fifty of whom have been added by one revival. Sixty-eight members 
gain thirty, and in all the assisted churches 4,000 members gain 500 in a 
single year, and count nearly 15,000 pledged teetotalers. 

The desolations previous to these revival years were fearful. One 
town of 1,400 reported less than 200 ever to be found in church. A 
man forty years old had never seen the communion administered until 
he was baptized and received it himself. A church reports that every- 
thing is discouraging except the perseverance of the saints. They did 
persevere, and with the preaching of their own pastors, without evan- 
gelists, they worked wonders. A church having only twenty-one mem- 
bers built a meeting-house, after a revival, costing $1,400. The smallest 
church in Massachusetts, with only seven members, had twenty con- 
versions. Another with twenty-one members only, two of whom were 
men, had twenty conversions, including a whole Bible class of seven 
men. A town of twenty-six voters had an average attendance at 
church of 175, and 800 in its temperance society. They were all evan- 
gelists in those days: a church of twenty-three members circulated 300,- 
000 pages of tracts in two years. The same growth of zeal was observed 
in the great revival of 1857. The year following witnesses additions to 
the churches exceeding those of the year before the revival by more than 
6,000. 

Historical events are intimately associated with revivals. On the 
borders of Rhode Island a precious work of grace was arrested by threats 
of civil war. A church which had been destroyed by Shays' rebellion in 
1787 was restored by a revival sixty years later. If the date of the dis- 
covery of gold in California should be lost, it could be restored by its 
effect on churches. Emigration west had begun long before, but 1849 is 
a marked date and is surpassed after the close of the Civil War. And 
beyond all questions, this is the most serious thing to be reckoned with 
in the rural problem. Nearly all of the churches which have become 
permanent beneficiaries of the society have been depleted by removals. 
And the best element of the population have invariably left their old 
homes. The supply of the vacuum has often been worse than abandoned 
farms for the churches, for the morals of the neighborhood. But we have 
always held the ground. Not a church in the depleted towns of Barn- 
stable, Plymouth, Franklin, and Berkshire has been permitted to perish 
if even a nucleus remained to keep it alive, and the churches have not 
suffered depletion as fast as the population. In fact, the missionary 
churches in the aggregate have been gaining about six and one-third per 



October, 1899 The Home Missionary 105 

cent, annually, while the gain of the self-supporting churches has not 
exceeded four and one-tenth per cent. 

To test this question of the neglect of diminishing towns, come down 
to 1886, when the worst effects of scattering the young men West and 
South after the war, of the congestion of population in cities, and of all 
other causes, would be sure to be felt in farming communities ; select 
ten churches in the most destitute places where aid had been sent for 
forty years in succession. The population had lost twenty-one per cent, 
and the churches had actually gained sixteen and six-tenths per cent, 
since 1846. This was a relative gain of forty-seven per cent. The gain 
by other denominations would increase the proportions one church mem- 
ber to eighteen in the population in 1846, and one to eight in 1886. 

Take twenty-three churches which had begun to suffer later by the 
rush to cities, and had received aid only ten years. In these twenty- 
three diminishing towns there was one church member to every eighteen 
of the population in 1876 and one in nine in 1886. And in all these 
cases the increase must have been very rapid during the previous four 
years, because in 1882, when manufacturing villages were rapidly increas- 
ing, and the arrival of French Canadians was first beginning to be re- 
marked upon, fear was expressed that the churches were not keeping pace 
with the population. There was a quick and effectual response to this 
appeal, and since that date the churches have been doing better than 
holding their own throughout the Commonwealth. They are holding the 
best things that make for sanitary reform, intelligence, good neighbor- 
hood, village improvement and all the sweet charities of life. There are 
churches in fishing villages, once fostered by us, where infant baptism 
is administered with this ritual : " If this child's father perishes on the 
Banks, we the members of this church covenant and promise to assist its 
widowed mother in its support and education." There are churchyards 
on the Cape where tombstones to empty graves in memory of those who 
have perished at sea outnumber the present population of the towns. 
God forbid that we should forsake, or that any man should despoil, the 
decimated ranks of our veteran Puritan churches ! 

We came to their rescue in their hardest straits, and had the reward 
of beholding reviving prosperity among them for many years. As far 
back as 1842 we began to notice that the number of churches needing aid 
was diminishing. This continued during the revival years. Somewhere 
there is a rash prophecy that the time is coming when there will be no 
more need of home missionary work in Massachusetts, and we shall have 
nothing to do but collect money and send it to New York ! Six less 
churches aided in 1852 than the previous year ; five less in 1854 than in 
1853, only forty in all, the number with which we began in 1818 ; only 
thirty-two in 1858 after the great revival. In all those best years we were 



106 The Home Missionary October, 1899 

sending about seven-eighths of our collections out West. Then the tide 
turned again. Hard times left an increasing number of churches on our 
hands. The numbers ran up to sixty before 1870, to eighty and more in 
1880, to 115 in 1890, and to 152 churches and missions aided in 1899. 
As early as i860 the conviction was felt that the home work must be 
enlarged, and in 1873 it was set forth in a series of emphatic resolutions 
by the General Association. Do you need any explanation of the turn 
of this tide about i860? What regiment was it that shed the first blood 
for the Union ? Listen to the reports sent from the old Bay State to our 
rooms during these awful years : " All my helpers gone to the front." 
" The brightest young man in town converted, received into covenant last 
Sunday, and enlisted the next day." " Nobody left in town but women 
and children and old men." And the end of the war, bringing such 
unprecedented prosperity to the nation, actually brought greater trials on 
the country churches. Our victorious soldiers were eager for the am- 
bitious enterprises of peace. And was this a loss to the country or to 
our own churches on the whole ? 

What has become of the young men who used to crowd the old meet- 
ing-houses ? They have made Wisconsin, Iowa, Minnesota, Colorado, 
and portions of Missouri a grander New England than ours in its golden 
days. They have come down from the Berkshire Hills to unearth corrup- 
tion in New York City. They are at the head of our banks and corpora- 
tions, on the bench, in legislative halls in all our cities. If anything 
except the judgment of God can arrest the process of monopolizing the 
industries and the supplies of the people by colossal trusts with watered 
stock, it will be the flaming conscience of some great deliverer raised up 
among business men in a country church where the spirit of Jesus the 
Carpenter is untouched by the Zeitgeist of materialism. 

Our depleted churches have created more vigorous churches in the 
cities ; nearly all that are extinct have simply given place to more useful 
churches in the valleys near the factories. And what of the new popula- 
tion which has rushed in to supply this demand for labor ? We are irri- 
tated by this problem of immigration. We have been too shy of ap- 
proaching the alien races that are crowding our centers of industry. It 
has been steadily gaining on us during one hundred years. We have the 
figures all down, reasoned upon with better tables for moral inferences 
than any you can find in State or national census, and followed with some 
measure of faithfulness, as signals of God's providence. We know when 
the foreign element was scarcely an ingredient of our population, when it 
w r as ten, twenty-five, and forty per cent. We counted in advance of the 
census, reckoning children of foreign-born parents with them, and dis- 
covered some years ago that this essentially foreign population had tipped 
the scale and become a majority in old Massachusetts. We knew just 



October, 1899 The Home Missionary 107 

when we had to take care of them or they would take care of us. And 
then we changed our policy back again to the original plan of the Massa- 
chusetts Missionary Society, and began once more to send evangelists in 
advance of churches to preach to Germans, Hollanders, Swedes, Nor- 
wegians, Italians, Armenians, Greeks, Finns, and Jews, of whom there 
are fifty thousand in Boston speaking and reading the jargon. And most 
of all we have ministered to the French Canadians, who have been 
streaming over the line until they constitute the most numerous alien 
race among us. Our appropriations for missions among foreign popula- 
tions in Massachusetts during the last five years exceed $n6,oco, and 
much the largest portion has been for the Canadians. They are all 
accessible. We are steadily gaining from the Roman Catholic Church, 
with which, however, we have never had a controversy. Indeed, we have 
never had a controversy with anybody. Once we were the established 
church. We had a little unpleasantness then with the Quakers. We 
have always been ashamed of it, though George Fox himself was ashamed 
of such Quakers. But that was long before we became a missionary 
society. Our records are clean of all schisms and uncharitableness. In 
1875 we proposed a systematic plan to all other evangelical missionary 
societies working in the Commonwealth : to visit with them every village 
where two or more churches were feeble, and one church might be strong; 
to withdraw if we were the feeblest, or if the majority preferred another ; 
and in every case to do all we could to suppress the evils of sectarianism. 
No answer was received to this overture except from one society, which 
declined. Nevertheless we have withdrawn from several fields where we 
were feeble and another was strong. We have absorbed all in a few 
others where we were by far the strongest. We have a church organiza- 
tion of a few members in one place, worshipping only with the Methodists. 
We have done something and mean to do a great deal more for the 
blessed cause of Christian unity. 



WESTERN PROSPERITY AND HOME MISSIONS 

IN KANSAS 

I take pleasure in answering the questions presented in your letter 
of August 3d. In preparing the answer to the first question I have been 
much aided by interviews with judicious business men of wide experi- 
ence and with well-informed State officials. 

First. The prosperity of Kansas as compared with three years ago. 
Unquestionably Kansas has made steady and substantial advance in its 
financial resources since 1896. 



108 The Home Missionary October, 1899 

First, three years ago the people were largely in debt. Now their debts 
are largely paid. The State Bank Commissioner estimates that $100,- 
000,000 of mortgage debts have been paid since 1896, leaving $75,000,000 
still unpaid. This unpaid balance includes mortgages for an aggregate 
of some millions made recently by farmers for the purchase of land. 
There have been few foreclosures since 1895. 

Again, three years ago there was little money in the banks. Now the 
banks have a large surplus. The deposits are by all classes ; and in 
banks on the western frontier as well as in eastern and central Kansas. 
On June 1, 1896, the State and private banks had $15,000,000 on deposit ; 
on June 20, 1899, these deposits exceeded $24,000,000. The State Bank 
Commissioner estimates that sixty per cent, cf these deposits are by 
farmers. A high authority estimates that one-half of the bank deposits 
are in the national banks, and that forty per cent, of these deposits are 
by farmers, which would make the average farmer deposit in the banks of 
the State fifty per cent, of the total amount. This fact has a bearing 
upon the financial ability of churches in an agricultural State. The banks 
cannot loan much money. Interest rates are low and growing lower. 

Again, we have made steady gain since 1896 in the total value of 
products. In 1896 the value was $190,000,000, in 1897 $230,000,000, in 
1898 $265,000,000, and we face the probability of having at least as large 
an aggregate volume of crops all over the State this year as the State has 
ever seen. 

Again, there is increased employment of labor. All seem to have 
work who want it, although they may not be able to choose their task. 
Farm work, mining, and work in the construction of the many new build- 
ings that are being erected in eastern Kansas represent the abundant 
work at hand. Prices for skilled labor are rising. 

The advance in land values is small. Probably our best new resources 
are the increased frugality, improved business principles, and courage of 
our citizens. 

Kansas, in 1899, is a thrifty youth, not rich, but with a moderate and 
growing competence, wise in avoiding debt, and convinced that self- 
reliance is the principle of prime importance in the future development 
of the material and religious enterprises in the State. 

Second. Have Cohgregationalists and home missionary churches 
shared equitably in such prosperity ? 

They have. 

Third. Do you believe that by proper and faithful effort the home 
missionary contributions in the current year, as well as the pledges of 
the churches for the support of their pastors, can be materially increased ? 

I think that the churches will not be burdened by contributing $4,500 
this year as against $3,121 last year. The former amount has been 



October, 1899 The Home Missionary 109 

apportioned by our board among the churches, and the responses thus far 
are favorable. For the last ten years our contributions (exclusive of 
legacies) have averaged $4,340 per year. 

Our home missionary chu'rches, as a whole, have made remarkable 
advances towards self-support in recent years, and their total gain in this 
respect this year may, consequently, not be large ; but their history 
pledges them to self-sacrifice and loyalty to the home missionary cause. 
—Supt. L. P. Broad. 

IN NEBRASKA 

In reply to the inquiry as to returning prosperity in Nebraska and its 
relation to church and home missionary interest, I am very glad to write 
that, as contrasted with the condition of affairs in our State three years 
ago, Nebraska is prosperous. There is by no means the high tide of ex- 
pectancy and expansion that characterized the boom era of ten to fifteen 
years ago. But from the depression and discouragement of three years 
since, all the interests of the State have rallied in a marked way. This 
is shown in the payment of debts, the erection of new buildings, increased 
bank deposits, sales of grain, live stock, etc. Although the wheat crop of 
the present year, as compared with one year ago, is almost a failure, thou- 
sands of acres of winter wheat having been ploughed under and thousands 
more unharVested, the crops of the past two years have been large and 
brought fair prices. In some cases farmers who offered their farms for a 
very low price in the spring of 1897, because anxious to leave the State, 
realized as much from the harvest of that year as was asked for the farm. 
They think better of Nebraska and are content to stay. The progress of 
sugar-beet culture in the valleys of the Platte and the Elkhorn, the de- 
velopment of alfalfa raising in the Republican Valley, with a great increase 
in all live-stock interests, have added much to the varied resources of the 
State. The corn crop of the present year, notwithstanding limited areas 
where hail and floods have entirely destroyed it, and other limited areas 
where drought has injured it, will be very large. Present estimates run 
from 200,000,000 to 300,000,000 bushels. This means not only millions 
of bushels for the general market, but the fattening of cattle, sheep, and 
hogs in great numbers. 

In our towns, houses that have been unoccupied are filled so that it is 
almost impossible for incoming families to find homes ; improvements of 
various sorts are in progress on residences and business blocks ; acres 
of fresh paint proclaim a brighter day for householders ; grain elevators 
have been built and others repaired ; railroads are extending their lines, 
lowering their grades, building side tracks, adding to rolling stock. Pros- 
perity has returned to Nebraska. 



1 10 The Home Missionary October, 189 

"Are our Congregational people sharing this prosperity ? " Certainly 
Our Congregational folks in Nebraska, like their brethren in the East, 
know a good thing when they see it, and, reading of the prosperity that 
has come to other parts of the country, do not mean to be left behind. 
Indications of better times are found in the erection of new church build- 
ings ; important improvements upon churches and parsonages, in the pay- 
ment of church debts, and in progress toward self-support. One field, 
consisting of three churches, has just declared for self-support, and several 
other fields are reducing their grants. A large number of our churches 
have paid their last instalments on debts to the C. C. B. S. on parsonage 
or church building. The July number of the Church Building Quarterly 
reports Nebraska fourth among the States in the number of churches 
contributing to its treasury the second quarter of the present year. 

" How will this affect pledges for self-support and contributions ? " 
Favorably, as it has already done. Our contributions last year showed a 
marked increase over those of the previous year. This year we expect 
to secure a larger advance. 

Nevertheless, it should be remembered that in Nebraska as in Kansas 
we are just recovering from the years of overwhelming loss and sore trial. 
No one not on the ground can appreciate the story of that calamitous 
summer of 1894 and the succeeding months of sorrow : over one-third 
of the State with crops literally cooked as if the blast from a furnace 
had blown upon them ; thousands of families reduced from circum- 
stances of comfort to become applicants for charity, that they and their 
children might live ; homes abandoned where the occupants could possi- 
bly get away ; stores closed ; banks shut up ; hogs, cattle, and sheep sold 
for a song because there was nothing to feed them ; the holders of mort- 
gages pressing for interest overdue. Is it any wonder that recovery has 
come slowly, and that the large crops of 1896-97 have only helped to 
pay debts ? Is it any wonder that people who have been used to support- 
ing the churches and giving to benevolent work should turn first of all to 
the protection of their homes and to making some provision for their 
families ? In those years of distress, church debts accumulated, instal- 
ments on churches, buildings, and parsonages could not be paid and were 
deferred ; many churches were barely kept alive by combining several 
into one field and by great sacrifice on the part of the pastors. Is it 
strange that with the coming of better times churches and pastors feel 
that better provision should be made for religious work, and that their 
own efforts to increase their offerings should be met by corresponding 
efforts on the part of older and stronger churches ? Evidently, some 
of these fields should be divided and restored to the ante-hard-times con- 
dition of things, so that larger growth may be secured. In some cases 
where the salary has been meager it should be increased to a comforta- 



9 



October, 1899 The Home Missionary in 

ble support. It should be remembered also that the development of 
western Nebraska, now well under way, and the railroad extension already 
in progress, will open new settlements where our churches should be 
planted at once and cared for. 

We are now engaged in active efforts to raise $5,000, and we believe 
it can be done. This will mean one-third more for the society than last 
year. Our Nebraska churches mean to do their part in this work of 
evangelizing America, that the influence of America may be felt among 
the nations of the world. We are all anxious to have our State press for- 
ward to self-support, but not to reach it through the loss of churches 
which should be cared for a little longer until able to care for themselves 
and help others. We trust, therefore,. the churches of the East will not 
be impatient of delay but help us to put our work upon broad and firm 
foundations for the future. — Supt. Harmon Bross, JD.D. 

IN INDIANA 

The paper " What Next?" presented at the Hartford meeting, is based 
upon the hope that the home missionary churches and States will roll 
up, during the current year, a considerably increased volume of receipts, 
as well as of pledges in support of their pastors. 

This expectation is justified in Indiana by improved material condi- 
tions. Compared with three years ago there is marked advance. Agri- 
cultural prosperity has restored the proper balance of population between 
town and country. Manufacturing centers have become hives of industry. 
The street corners are no longer thronged with idle laborers. The 
employment bureaus of the Young Men's Christian Association are not 
now besieged with applicants for positions. There is work for all at a 
living wage. 

The home market for produce has become stable, trade is active, 
enterprises are being set afoot which assume that the common people 
have money to spend. Home capital is seeking investment. Debts are 
being paid. New transportation lines are building. Cities are making 
extensive improvements, and factories- are increasing their facilities and 
output. The bank clearings show an immense increase in the volume of 
business. Confidence seems to be restored. Despite the manipulation 
of trusts, and the occasional emergence of unjust and disheartening con- 
ditions, it is true that Indiana was never so prosperous as now. 

It is the beginning of better days for the churches. A pastor whose 
church attained self-support after eight years' dependence writes : " Our 
church is now free from debt. The town is growing rapidly and the 
prospects are very bright. The financial condition is stronger than ever 
before. The people seem greatly encouraged by the outlook." 



ii2 The Home Missionary October, 1899 

Another church, four years old, is attempting to build. The pastor 
reports he has secured nearly $2,000 outside the congregation. A small 
church of the same age, which has built and paid for a neat house of 
worship, but whose yearly pledges have never exceeded $150, now pledges 
$400. 

The young Dunkirk church has just paid $1,200 to complete the 
edifice. 

Ridgeville people this summer raised $3,000 for their new building. 
The only Congregational family of eight years ago led with $500. 

Congregational ideas are growing in Indiana, and are extended to 
many places where there is no Congregational church. The Virginia- 
born statutes are being modified in conformity with Ohio and Michigan 
law. There is an approach to the town-meeting idea. A judge tri- 
umphantly remarks : " At last we have a town council, a town meeting of 
at least three." The tendency is toward increased local responsibility. 
As the political life is thus modified and the people are educated in self- 
government, Congregationalism finds a more ready acceptance. Indiana 
is a virgin commonwealth being prepared slowly for the reception of the 
educational, individualistic, and conscience-quickening forces of the Pil- 
grim faith. 

Providence opens to us a splendid prospect for a successful campaign 
of education in the Middle West. It is bound to be a base of supplies. 
The churches of Indiana will respond grandly to the call for a new mis- 
sionary consecration. — Slept. E. D. Curtis, D.D. 

IN SOUTH DAKOTA 

Superintendent Thrall has furnished at some length the opinions 
of leading business men in the State, which we condense and summarize 
as follows : 

Prosperity is coming in South Dakota, in sympathy with returning 
confidence throughout the land. The general condition of the people 
has been greatly bettered, but there is still a long distance to be spanned 
from that of our most distressing poverty to that of the ordinary comforts 
of life, and until the people have got to that point where they do not 
have to struggle for the necessaries of life there can be no great improve- 
ment in church beneficence. Friends in the East may rest assured that 
in time the people of South Dakota will become self-supporting and 
generous contributors. There has been a great gain in prosperity in 
three years. 

Congregationalists will get their share of this prosperity, but unfor- 
tunately there are many obligations in one form or other brought over 
from former years to meet, and repairs delayed in poorer years to be made, 



October, 1899 The Home Missionary 113 

so that the churches do not seem in a position to do much more, notwith- 
standing their increased prosperity. When the people borrowed easily 
and pay-day was ahead they gave with comparative freedom ; now that 
pay-day is at hand, supplies exhausted, everything needing repairs, giving 
comes hard. Nevertheless, the new courage that has come to the people 
will make them more steady in their benevolence and more healthy 
in their giving. The feeling of uncertainty as to South Dakota's future 
is being supplanted by a feeling of confidence which will surely yield 
large returns if we can but wait for them. — Sapt. W. H. Thrall. 



FROM UNDER THE ARCTIC CIRCLE 

By Rev. Loyal L. Wirt, Superintendent of Alaska 

St. Michael, Alaska, August 10, 1899. — I have now been in St. 
Michael just two weeks, and am almost at a loss where to begin to tell 
you how wonderfully God has opened the way for us to take up a greatly 
needed work here. 

Allow me to introduce to you the " St. Bernard Relief Station " — in 
other words, the Congregational Church, parsonage, and reading room of 
St. Michael. 

I have no Aladdin's lamp, but the Lord has a way of opening the 
hearts of people in Alaska to his work which makes the humblest of us 
feel in a peculiar sense the blessedness of working together with him. 
Yesterday a barge of lumber landed on the beach in front of the beautiful 
lot whhh has been donated to our church, and this morning the workmen 
began laying the foundation. Give us two weeks more and the dozen 
men who have been promised us, and we will have our building completed 
— a chapel 22 x 30, with a parsonage annex 14 x 30. The chapel will be 
converted into a library and public sitting room during week days, for the 
hundreds of men who will winter here. The three living rooms will give 
a home to the missionary in charge of this station, and also give us a place 
to care for a few of the many unfortunates who become stranded upon 
this island. 

But, you are saying, who pays for this building, with lumber at seventy- 
five dollars per thousand, and other material in proportion ? Every dollar 
is provided for, and the whole institution was practically paid for before a 
stick of timber was on the ground. It has taken two weeks' hard work, 
but the building is now in the hands of a competent committee, leaving 
me comparatively free for a few days. The building we are erecting 
would cost about $1,500 in the States, but here it is worth three times that 
amount. 



114 The Home Missionary October, 1899 

Yesterday the superintendent of a line of steamers invited me tc 
accompany him to Cape Nome, where the mining excitement is at fever 
heat. We expect to start this evening. They say that the restraining, 
subduing influences of the Gospel are desperately needed over there, but 
I can scarcely believe that there can be a place in the world more utterly 
bereft of all Christian thought or action than St. Michael. 

Imagine a place with a summer population of 2,000, which diminishes 
to perhaps 300 permanent white residents in winter, but with a constant 
stream of transients passing through, anywhere from 10,000 to 15,000 a 
year, — a place containing fine hotels, great stores, comfortable homes, and 
where millions of dollars are invested, and yet without a Protestant service 
of any kind from one year's end to another ! There is a Graeco-Russian 
Church here with a service about once a month. Also a Jesuit missionary 
cottage, where those of their order stay when they come in from the in- 
terior missions to purchase supplies — but that is all. 

Perhaps you do not wonder now that the people here (and there are 
some Christians) receive me gladly, and were ready to act upon my sug- 
gestion that we put up a church before October's frosts freeze things up 
tight. 

On the first of the two Sundays I spent in St. Michael I picked up a 
half-dozen children and carried them off to the apartments of a Christian 
lady who lives in the hotel at which I am staying. That Sunday-school 
class must ever stand as the beginning of our work on the Lower Yukon. 
There are not many children on the island, but on the next Sunday we 
doubled our numbers — and I am sure more than doubled the interest. As 
soon as we get into our own building a Bible class among the men will 
form the strength of our Sunday-school work. Fortunately, the good 
stock of Sunday-school supplies sent by the Society reached me before I 
left Juneau, so that this school will have sufficient to last them until the 
first steamer can get through the pack ice next spring — which will not be 
until the middle of June. 

The dining rooms of the two largest hotels have been very generously 
placed at my disposal until the chapel is completed. Thus I have been 
able to hold service twice each Sunday. There has been a steady increase 
of interest and attendance. Last Sunday evening the eighty dining-room 
chairs were all occupied, while the rear of the room and the hallway were 
crowded with those who stood through the service. When I called for 
volunteer carpenters to work without pay on the church, six men imme- 
diately offered themselves, and I understand there will be others. 

In speaking of our proposed work, the manager of the leading com- 
pany emphasized the peculiar need of a resident minister. While every- 
body else was here for the one purpose of bending every thought, minute, 
and energy to money-getting, he had felt the serious need of some one to 



October, 1899 The Home Missionary 115 

go into and out of these homes, hotels, lunch houses, tents, and houseboats, 
whose time and talents were consecrated to less selfish ends, — a man of 
loving heart, broad sympathies, and sound judgment, ready to give himself 
in service to any and all. Feeling these things, he subscribed one-fourth 
of the material for our " Relief Station." Another man, the United States 
Commissioner, called me into his office one day and said he would be one 
of ten to pay our minister $r,ooo a year when we got ready to send 
him. 

I do not need to dwell upon the joy it will be to give these people the 
blessings of the Sunday-school, the prayer-meeting, and the preached 
word : to break the Bread of Life among them, and, by word and ex- 
ample, seek to lead some, many, to Christ. Yet, while not neglecting 
these higher ministrations, there is lamentable need here for the practical 
kind of Christian service which good St. Bernard exemplified at Clairvoix. 
And the conditions which must perpetually surround this mission so long 
as people live in Alaska are, in many respects, similar to those which sur- 
rounded that famous Alpine monastery. 

Now do you see why I insisted upon having that " parsonage annex " ? 
We can care for quite a number of frost-bitten travelers in those three 
rooms. But there are other things besides frost which knock a man out 
in these latitudes — scurvy, whiskey, dead-brokenness, despondency. We 
can't do much in the face of so much suffering as one sees here constantly, 
but we will do a little — what we can in our small quarters, and perhaps 
next year we can build a hospital, or at least a larger hospice. The chapel 
we shall carpet, furnish, light, heat, and stock with all the books and 
magazines we can get hold of, and this shall be a public sitting room during 
the long dark days for all who may come. 



A PLEA FOR MISSOURI 

By Rev. A. K. Wray, D.D., Superintendent 

At the beginning of the century the territory out of which Missouri 
was carved belonged to France. It became a Territory of the United 
States in 1812 and a State in 1821. For several years before, and for 
nearly fifty years after her admission into the Union, Missouri was the 
field of intense and often bitter political struggle. It came into the family 
of States through the back door as a slave State. But politically there 
was no peace nor rest in this great State. When the guns at Fort Sumter 
called for loyalty to assert itself, Missouri hung for some time in the 
balance, but was finally saved to the Union. But households were divided 



n6 The Home Missionary October, 1899 

and the battle was transferred from the forum to the field. One of the 
first battles of the Civil War was fought on Missouri soil, and from June, 
1861, till the close of the conflict she was ravaged by fire and sword. 

It is often said that Congregationalism is adapted to all peoples and 
soils, and if it only have a fair chance it will nourish anywhere. This I 
believe in the main is true. But some of us are beginning to realize that 
our polity has not had a fair chance in Missouri. We undertook to plant 
it without proper regard to the conditions antecedent to its growth. We 
began by reckoning upon conditions that did not exist, and trusted to the 
polity, with its history and traditions, to recommend itself to the favorable 
consideration and cordial support of a people to which it was not only 
new but in large measure contrary to ideas and customs which had pre- 
vailed for a century or more. 

In 1866 we began to organize churches in the northern half of the State. 
Society was disorganized, prejudices and sectionalism were still strong — 
often bitter. Under the impetus of railroad extension, and because of the 
cheapness of the land, there came immediately after the war a strong 
tide of emigration from the North and East. They distributed themselves 
all across the State, only a few settling in any locality. Many of these 
new comers were Congregationalists. They asked for a church of their 
order. All churches were more or less broken up, and among the new 
comers were many of other faiths who were willing for the time to join 
with us in the establishment of regular worship. These churches were 
at best only a confederation of denominations for temporary needs. 
Gradually the other denominations began to organize according to their 
own order and pull out of the confederation. In most cases Congrega- 
tionalists were the weakest in numbers. The other denominations were 
all better known by the native element, and in most cases offered a lower 
standard of church life and practice, and the result was that our churches, 
thus deserted, languished and died. The " common denominator " idea 
worked beautifully for a few years, but, so far as we are concerned, the 
complete problem left us a very improper fraction. 

Almost without exception, the extinct churches are in the northern 
section of the State. We rushed in where angels fear to tread. The 
people were not prepared for the new sect. The soil was not ready for 
the seed, and, however painful it may be, it is not at all strange to those 
of us who have been longest in the field and have been most familiar with 
the situation from the beginning. It is said it has taken a generation to 
learn how to farm in Kansas. It may fairly be said it has taken as long 
for Congregationalists to learn how to do spiritual work effectively in 
Missouri. 

But we believe we are beginning to learn how to do spiritual farming 
in this region. It is generally conceded that the chief work for us lies 



October, 1899 The Home Missionary 117 

south of the Missouri River. Here are located our Drury College and 
three of our academies. Here the population is most rabidly increasing. 
Here are still offered cheap homes. Here the needs of the people are 
greatest and opportunity for constructive work most abundant. 

But in order to do effective work we must train a constituency. We 
must revert to first principles and begin to do as our fathers did on New 
England soil — plant the school house alongside the church. We must get 
near the cradle to begin. The men and women of middle life or past are 
perhaps established in their ways of thinking and living. Their religion, 
like their politics, is good enough for them because it was good enough 
for their fathers. But their children are susceptible to impressions and 
are capable of better things. To do the work solidly will require time. 
We shall meet with just that indifference and opposition which reformers 
always meet. A poor and false religion takes just as much hold on the 
masses as a good and true one, and the stronger the stock the more tena- 
ciously they hold to their faith and practice. This opposition is to the 
credit rather than to the disparagement of the people. It shows what 
sort of stuff they are made of. Putty people are not worth the effort it 
costs to reform them. They are deficient in the qualities of character out 
of which virile citizens or effective Christians are made. Here we have 
a strong, sturdy stock with a brave, heroic ancestry. 

The logical order of our work in this region must be teaching first, 
then preaching ; first the school house, afterwards the meeting house. 
You may have a religion flourish without education, but you must not 
expect the Christian religion to flourish. Churches may live after a 
fashion where illiteracy abounds, but not Congregational churches. In- 
telligence is essential to the life of a Congregational church. We should 
not expect to organize churches in this section that will spring up into 
vigor and permanency in a few years. To attempt such work would be 
to repeat the past. Better to have missions which in time will grow into 
churches than to start with a weak church in an environment unpropitious 
which sooner or later degenerates into a mission or dies altogether. What 
we need for this work is missionaries, not pastors. We should send men 
and women among these people commissioned to preach the Gospel — not 
primarily to organize churches. They should do as they would if they 
went to foreign lands commissioned by the American Board. They must 
know the language and habits of speech of the people. They will need 
to study their forms of worship and their peculiar ideas concerning the 
essentials in religion and their relation to practical life. These mission- 
aries must be Christ-like enough to respect the opinion of those to whom 
they would minister and give them credit for sincerity in their crude con- 
ceptions. They must acquaint themselves with the history and traditions 
of the people and be able to enter sympathetically into their lives. They 



1 1 8 The Home Missionary October, 1899 

must enter into their homes and understand, from contact, something of 
their poverty. They will need all the fruits of the Spirit, but especially 
gentleness, patience, and love. They must preach concrete rather than 
dogmatic theology. In short, what we need and must have before we 
can ever hope to lift these good people up into the broader, better light 
of the twentieth-century Christianity and change their whole life — domes- 
tic, social, and religious ; what we need, I repeat, is the real missionary 
of the Cross constrained by the love of Christ. 

Here are multitudes sitting in darkness. Let us not ask whether we 
can establish churches among them, but rather determine among ourselves 
to carry the light of the gospel of the Son of God to them. If we cannot 
have a church, then let us commission our missionaries as teachers of 
righteousness, and let them gather whomsoever will come to them — espe- 
cially the children and youth, and teach them by life and lip not only what 
is contained in text books, but the principles of a higher and nobler life. 
We are not allowed to teach the Scriptures in our common schools, but in 
these missionary schools conducted by private individuals we have such 
an opportunity as can be had in no other way. In this direct contact with 
the whole life we may combine the best industrial and economic instruction 
with the intellectual and religious, and so develop and transform the whole 
life. There is scarcely a village or neighborhood in all this region which 
will not eagerly welcome a school and listen joyfully to the teacher who 
expounds the Scripture in the schoolroom or on Sunday. This is not a 
theory or a dream. We have demonstrated its possibility, and seen the 
happy results. In such places as Iberia and Noble we have enough to 
make our hearts leap with joy. Here our teachers are preachers as well 
as teachers. In less than a decade, and with comparatively small outlay, 
these missionary teachers have literally transformed the country for miles 
around, and all life has been enriched by their gracious influence. In 
both these places the Church had struggled for years with but little 
growth. Since these larger missionary efforts have been in operation the 
churches have received large accessions of young men and women who 
have been trained to think and act intelligently, and are strong, helpful 
Christians. This may not be exactly according to the time-honored 
method of the Society, but men are worth more than methods, and it is 
more important to save men than to perpetuate a method. Better for the 
Society to adopt Paul's motto and be all things to all men if by any means 
we may save some. 



It is for active service soldiers are drilled, and trained, and armed, and 
fed. That is why you and I are in the world — not to preparetc go out of it 
some day, but to serve God in it now. — Henry Drummond. 



October, i! 



The Home Missionary 



119 



APPOINTMENTS 



JUNE, 1899 



Not in commission last year 

Baskerville, Mark, Spokane, Wash. 

Boss, Roger C, Brookville, Kan. 

Burdeshaw, James J., Taylor, Ala. 

Curran, Edward, Astoria, Or. 

Cushman, Charles E., Kansas City, Kan. 

Dahlberg, Oscar, Missoula, Mon. 

Davies, William C, Catasauqua, Penn. 

Gibson, Jacob M , Tallasee, East Tallasee and 

Good Hope, Ala. 
Gober, Hockenhull M., Amos, Ala. 
Gordon, David B., Rainier, Or. 
Guilford, William, Clio, Ala. 
Hanna, Thomas, Cottonwood, No. Cal. 
Hathaway, W. B., Ocoee, Fla. 
London, Joseph N., Gage, Ala. 
Mathews, James L., Dorcas, Fla. 
Nelson, Frank, Warren, Penn. 
Newton, William H., Dothan and Wicksburg, 

Ala. 
Nickerson, Roscoe S., Porter and Turnersville, 

Ind. 
Olinger, William G., Tacoma, Wash. 
Peacock, Fred., Trenton, Neb. 
Sargent, George W., Alton, Kan. 
Sawyer, Leicester J., Eden, Fla. 
Sherrod, Edgar A., Waukomis, Okla. 
Sloan, William, Port Arthur, Texas. 
Smead, H. G., Eagle Rock and La Canada, So. 

Cal. 
Stewart, David C, Cerro Gordo and Potolo, Fla. 
Williams, David T., Fort Wayne, Ind. 



Re-comm issio tied 

Anderson, Martin E., Tacoma, Wash. 

Andrewson, Andrew J., Maple Valley, Wis. 

Austin, Lewis A., Orange City, Fla. 

Ard, David T., Art and Spio, Ala. 

Arnett, Samuel G., Lorin, No. Cal. 

Atkinson, George E., Tekoa, Wash. 

Atkinson, William H., San Rafael, No. Cal. 

Bartlett, Dana W., Los Angeles, So. Cal. 

Bascom, George S., Oriska, No. Dak. 

Beman, Albert M., Kidder, Mo. 

Bigelow, Frank E., Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Biggers, Lorenzo J., Opelika, A! a. 

Bolton, James, Cocoanut Grove, Fla. 

Bosworth, William A., Wichita, Kan. 

Bown, Frank A., Walker, Minn. 

Brackin, Elisha, Cottonwood, Ala. 

Branan, Seborn R., Art and Asbury, Ala. 

Breckenridge, Daniel M., Ormond, Fla. 

Bright, David F., Gillett, Colo. 

Brown, Willard D., Interlachen, Fla. 

Brown, George E., Wheeler, So. Dak. 

Bunnell, John J., Fort Payne, Tucker, Pleasant 

Grove and Mt. Tabor, Ala. 
Butler, Elmer W., Melbourne, Fla. 
Butler, Jesse C, Central, Kidd, Kent and Cotton 

Store, Ala. 
Campbell, Charles. Sanford, Fla. 
Cartledge, Henry C, New Smyrna, Fla. 
Champlin, Oliver P., Antelope and Dwight, No. 

Dak. 
Chatfield, George A., Lyons, Colo. 
Childs, Lucas S., Seward, Okla. 
Clark, Orville C, Missoula, Mont. 
Clarke, Almon T., Shelby, Ala. 
Conard, William J., Akeley, Minn. 
Cooke, William H., Sunol, No. Cal. 



Coombe, Philip, San Francisco, No. Cal. 

Culver, William C, Rays Hill, Ala. 

Day, William C, Rocklin, No. Cal. 

Dessup, J. J., Munson and Winburne, Penn. 

Dickerson, Charles H., Newark, N. J. 

Dickson, James P., San Francisco, No. Cal. 

Dodd, Arthur C, National City, So. Cal. 

Donaldson, Levi J., Tavares, Fla. 

Edwards, Jonathan, Spokane, Wash. 

Ellis, John T., Ree Heights, So. Dak. 

Esterborg, Joseph, Troy, Idaho. 

Foster, Festus, Robinson, Utah. 

Foust, Joseph D., Hanceville, Tidmore, and Tid- 

mill, Ala. 
Frazee, John H., Knoxville, Tenn. 
Frazer, Charles W., Key West, Fla. 
Gay, William M., Pomona, Fla. 
Gunn, Elberry B., New Site and Jackson's Gap, 

Ala. 
Goodsell, Dennis, Byron, No. Cal. 
Haggquist, F. G., Wood Lake and Doctor's Lake, 

No. Wis. 
Ham, Richard K., Ocean View, No. Cal. 
Hargett, Henry L., Gate City, Ala. 
Hartley, John, Alva, Okla. 
Haven, Egbert D., Woodland, No. Cal. 
Henry, Emma K., Springfield, So. Dak. 
Hernandez, Sebastian, San Jose", New Mex. 
Hollars, John A., White Oaks, New Mex. 
Houston, Warren H., Arcadia, Neb. 
Hubbard, William B., Webster, So. Dak. 
Jasper, Gustavus A., Loleta, No. Cal. 
Jenney, E. W., Howard, So. Dak. 
Johnson, Ansel E., Antiocb, No. Cal. 
Jones, John D., Medical Lake, Wash. 
Jones, John L., Madison, Minn. 
Judah, Solomon B., Cottondale and Bonifay, Fla. 
Kirtland, Charles C., Sebastopol, No. Cal. 
Krause, F. C, Fitchburg, No. Cal. 
Krause, Fred. C, Hillyard, Wash. 
Lackey, James M., Steilacoom, Wash. 
Lange, John G., Weatherford, Okla. 
Larson, Anton, Clintonville, No. Wis. 
Leufstedt, Gustaf W., East Orange, N. J. 
Loveless, Evan J., Arbacoochee, Cherry, Chula- 

finne and Lofty, Ala. 
Lundquist, Carl J., Chandlers Valley, Penn. 
Mack, Charles A., Inkster, No. Dak. 
McConaughy, Frank, Clayton and Chattaroy, 

Wash. 
McCroskv, John A., Riverdale, Mo. 
Mair, William M., Henry, So. Dak. 
Marshall, Martin V., Watsford, Blackwood and 

Dunedin, Ala. 
Mason, Charles E., Mountain Home, Utah. 
Mathison, Elias, Echo, Ala. 
Miller, Louis, Hurobo, Fla. 
Miller, Willie G., Campton, Fla. 
Milligan, John A., Porterville, No. Cal. 
Milstead, Charles A., Clanton, Kingston and Mt. 

Springs, Ala. 
Moya, Jesus M., Los Ranchos de Atrisco, New 

Mex. 
Nichols, Danforth B., Mission Hill, So. Dak. 
Noble, Mason, Lake Helen, Fla. 
Norseen, Oscar G., Perth Amboy, N. J. 
Noyes, Warren L.. Oleander, No. Cal. 
Oehler, Frederic H., New Richland, Otisco and 

Hartland, Minn. 
Okerstein, John F., Minneapolis, Minn. 
Olds, Alphonzo R., Eureka. Wash. 
Olsen, Anton, Ekdall, No. Wis. 
Paine, Samuel D , West Palm Beach, Fla. 
Painter, Harry M., Pataha City, Wash. 



120 



The Home Missionary 



October, ii 



Pcnniman, Andrew O., Dunkirk, Ind. 

Perry, George H., Pocatello, Idaho. 

Peterson, Mathias, Aberdeen, Wash. 

Pharr, Theodore A., Georgianna, Fla. 

Pharr, Theodore A., Hilton, Milligan and Rose 

Hill, Ala. 
Phillips, Charles H., Jamestown, No. Dak. 
Rathbone, Leland D., Santa Rosa. No. Cal. 
Rayon, Thomas F., Palermo, Wyandotte and 

Cherokee, No. Cal. 
Read, James L., Crested Butte, Colo. 
Remele, William A., Olympia, Wash. 
Rice, Francis M., Milner, Ala. 
Rives, Charles J., Mt. Hope and Cimarron, Okla. 
Roberts, Clarence E., Valencia and Plymouth 

Rock, Kan. 
Robertson, William J., Addison and Houston, Ala. 
Simmons, Daniel A., Crestview, Holley and 

Laurel Hill, Fla. 
Smith, Richard, Shipshewana, Ind. 
Smith, Thomas, Indianapolis. Ind. 
Smith, William R., Hetland, So. Dak. 
Spittell, Jabez, Worthing, So. Dak. 
Stevens, William D., Noble, Mo. 
Stewart, John L., Henderson, Ala. 
Stewart, John Richard, Leon and Liberty, Ala. 



Swartout, Edgar P., Gann Valley, Duncan and 

Pleasant Valley, So. Dak. 
Tebbets, Arthur H., Dawson, Minn. 
Townsend, Stephen ]., Haines City and Avon 

Park, Fla. 
Travis, David Q., San Andreas and Mokelumne 

Hill, No. Cal. 
Vaughan, George W., Edwardsville and Oxford, 

Ala. 
Waits, George W. C, Sulligent, Ala. 
Wallace, Louis, Sierra Valley, No. Cal. 
Walton, James A., Beulah, So. Dak. 
Warren, Leroy, Kansas City, Mo. 
Washburn. Francis M., Rohnerville, Hydesville, 

and Alton, No. Cal. 
Watkins, Joseph V., Oxford, Ala. 
Webb, Henry W., Columbia, So. Dak. 
Wells, Archibald C, Lightwood and Central, 

Ala. 
Wheeler, Sheldon H., Compton, So. Cal. 
White, Isaac J., Halton, Ala. 
Whitelaw, James D., General Missionary, Wis. 
Wideberg, C. J.,_Arnot, Penn. 
Wilcox, Charles E., Biwabik, Minn. 
Wright, Turner, Ashland, Millerville, Meadow, 

and Fredonia, Ala. 



JULY, 1899 



Not in commission last year 

Adams. A. D., New Richmond, Wis. 

Auld, Isaac M., St. Petersburg, Fla. 

Black, Robert F., Waubay, So. Dak. 

Crawford, H. D., Aberdeen, Wash. 

De Barritt, Alfred, Havana, Cuba. 

Etherton, Guy E.. Argentine, Kan. 

Faulk. Joseph, Tohee, Okla. 

Full, Webster, Perkins, Okla. 

Garlik, Andrew, Duquesne, Penn. 

Harp, Cyrus D., Baltimore, Md. 

Hathaway, W. B., New Smyrna, Fla. 

Hubbell, W. H., Pingree, No. Dak. 

King, Christopher C, Braden, Ga. 

King, James S., Wilsonville, Ga. 

Kovac, Andrew, Allegheny, Penn. 

Johnson, Solomon D., Vohna, Ala. 

Jones, Winfield S., Brantley, Ala. 

Lovejoy, Wallace W., Avalon. So. Cal. 

Lyle, Andrew J., Oakwood, Ga. 

Naylor, James W., Independence. Okla. 

Neilan, Joseph D., Willow Springs, Mc. 

Noyes, Warren L., Rialto, So. Cal. 

Owen, Edward P., Ridgeway, Okla. 

Owens, Edmund, Springdale and Chewelah, Wash. 

Rice, Francis M., Lamar, Ala. 

Sabol, John, Elmdale, Minn. 

Sahlstrom, Lars A., Pelican Rapids, Minn. 

Shaw, William, Gen. Missionary in Georgia. 

Singleton, James H., Starkville, Colo. 

Speers, William J., Bloomington, So. Cal. 

Spillers, Ashbel P., Sibley, Ga. 

Stevens, John L., Eldon, Tuscumbia, and Iberia, 

Mo. 
Talmage, Luther C, Bremen, Ind. 
Trout, J. M., West Duluth, Minn. 
Trussell, William F., Winona, Minn. 
Umsted, Owen, Pittsburg, Kan. 
Willet, George, San Luis Obispo, So. Cal. 

Re-commissioned 

Adams, Clinton B., Philadelphia. Penn. 
Arnold, William A., Edmonds. Wash. 
Beauchamp, Jethro M., Corvallis, Or. 
Beebe, Julius R., Sanborn, No. Dak. 
Birlew, Gordon E., San Rafael, New Mex. 
Blackburn, John F., Ft. Valley, Ga. 
Blankin, Jeff. D., Oakridge of De Funiak Springs, 
Fla. 



Boylan, Frank G., Cortez, Colo. 

Bradford, Benjamin F., Cedar Grove, N. J. 

Brewer, William F., General Missionary in Ga. 

Brintnall, Loren W., Roy, Wash. 

Burkett, C. E., River Falls and Wallace, Ala. 

Burkett, C. E., Milton, Fla. 

Bushell, Jonas, Eagle Harbor, Wash. 

Cheadle, Stephen H., San Juan, No. Cal. 

Colp, Donald G., Fargo, No. Dak. 

Corbin, Oliver L.. Creede, Colo. 

Cumbus, George W., Columbus, Ga. 

Davis, Albert A., Lakeland, Minn. 

Dean, Frank W., Red Cloud. Neb. 

Denison, George B., Kansas City, Mo. 

Doane, Frank B., Cheney, Wash. 

Doyle, Amos A., Colville, Wash. 

Dunham, Warren N., Cheyenne, Wyo. 

Egerland, Franz. Crete, Neb. 

Farnsworth, E. D., Edison, Wash. 

Forrester, James C, Hoschton, Ga. 

Foster, Benjamin F., Lawrence, Kan. 

Foster, Guy, Challis, Idaho. 

Gilliam, John W., North Rome. Ga. 

Gilmore, William C, Valley Springs, So. Dak. 

Goodwin, Samuel H., Provo City, Utah. 

Graham, William H., Lifsey, Ga. 

Gregory, Herbert, Spanway, Wash. 

Haines, Oliver S., Ferndale. Wash. 

Hand, La Roy S., Omaha, Neb. 

Hassell, Richard B., Everett, Wash. 

Heinzelman, Henry W., Michigan City, Ind. 

Home, Gideon, Woodbury, Ga. 

Hoskins, Emanuel, Pescadero, No. Cal. 

Iorns, Benjamin, Fertile, Minn. 

Ives, Joseph B., Paradise, No. Cal. 

James, Bartlett B., Monterey, Penn. 

Jamison, Henry W., Beresford, So. Dak. 

Johnson, W. N., Melville, No. Dak. 

Jones, John E., Dawson, No. Dak. 

Jones, Richard, Myron, So. Dak. 

Kevan. James H., Rock Springs, Wyo. 

Kent, William H., Chamberlain, So. Dak. 

Klopp, John J., Stanton, Neb. 

Krause, F. O., Appleton, Minn. 

Lambert, Charles E., Tacoma, Wash. 

Lawson, Francis, Guerneville, No. Cal. 

Lee, George H., Seattle. Wash. 

Lewis, John, Detroit, Mich. 

Lock wood, John W. H.. Leavenworth. Wash. 

Lucas, Oramel W., Pacific Grove, No. Cal. 

Luter, Elves D., Moss Bluff and Panasoffkee, Fla. 



October, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



121 



Lyons, E. C, Southwestern Minn. 

Martin, John L., Sykeston and Cathay, No. Dak. 

Mason, Horace C, Pullman, Wash. 

Mercer, Henry W, Long Beach, Wash. 

Michael, George, Halstead, Minn. 

Moody, Benjamin F., San Andreas, No. Cal. 

Morris, Maurice B., Dayton, Wash. 

Mote, Henry W., D.D., Christopher, Wash. 

Nash, James H., Lovejoy, Ga. 

Nelson, Gustave W., Port Angeles, Wash. 

Newton, H. E., Braswell and Clara, Ga. 

Pearse, F. F , Nordhoff, So. Cal. 

Pease, Fran* W., Alma, Neb. 

Phillips, William O., Demorest, Ga. 

Price, Edgar H., Hamilton, Mo. 

Robberts, James F., Altona, Okla. 

Roberts. Owen W., Wimbledon and Kensal, No. 

Dak. 
Robinson, William H., Rosedale, So. Cal. 
Samuel, Benjamin, Villard, Minn. 
Saunders, Eben E., Oberon, No. Dak. 
Scott, Andrew J., Kenwood, No. Cal. 
Single, John, Butte, Neb. 
Slocombe, Samuel, San Francisco, No. Cal. 
Smead, Henry G., La Canada, So. Cal. 



Smith, Green N., Friendship, Ga. 
Smythe, Charles M., Verndale, Minn. 
Snyder, Charles W., Stillwater, Okla. 
Spangler, George B., Minersville, Neb. 
Squire, Abraham L., Strang and Shickley, Neb. 
Stevens, Julius, Bryant, So. Dak. 
Street, Walter B., Anderson, Ind. 
Totusek, V., Begonia, Va. 
Updyke, Stephen G., Minneapolis, Minn. 
Vogt, W. F., Herndon, Logan, and Ludell, Neb. 
Wales, Fred H., Black Diamond, No. Cal. 
Wells, Charles W., Freewater, Ingle Chapel, and 

Fairview, Ore. 
Wheat, Frank I., San Francisco, No. Cal. 
Winchester, Benjamin S., Snohomish, Wash. 
Wiswell, Thomas C, Seattle, Wash. 
Williams, Mark W., Big Lake, Minn. 
Woodcock, Thomas J., Lead, So. Dak. 
Woodruff, Purl G., Caryville, Vernon, Westville, 

and Bonifay, Fla. 
Woodruff, Purl G., General Missionary in Ala. 
Wright, Reuben B., Boise, Idaho. 
Wurrschmidt, C. W., Hastings and Inland, Neb. 
Young, William E., Beulah, Wash. 



AUGUST, 1899 



Not in commission last year 

Cary, Joseph P., Rosalia, Wash. 

Chase, S. A., Mcintosh, Mentor, and Erskine, 

Minn. 
Dawson, William L., Ahtanum, Wash. 
Forbes, Harry L., Highmore, So. Dak. 
Hays. Herbert, Thayer, Mo. 
Heglin. Samuel S., Plankinton, So. Dak. 
Markell, Harry L., Rico, Colo. 
Matthews, James T., Plymouth, Penn. 
Parker, Lawrence J., Guthrie, Okla. 
Reynolds, A. L., Joplin, Mo. 
Washburn, C. H., Salt Lake City, Utah. 
Yarrow, P. W., Fosston, Minn. 
Yukl, Adolf, Milwaukee, Wis. 

Re-commissioned 

Barber, James M., Spearfish, So. Dak. 
Barber, Jerome M-, Sherwood, Or. 
Beauchamp, Jethro M., Indian Valley, Idaho. 
Bolin, Nels J., Upsala, Minn. 
Bortel, Harvey B., Brainerd, Minn. 
Brady, Alexander, Cathlamet, Wash. 
Brooks, Raymond C, Eugene, Or. 
Bushell, Richard, Marysville, Wash. 
Davies, James, Bowdle, So. Dak. 
Dawson, William E., Blaine, Wash. 
Dent, Thomas J.. North Yakima, Wash. 
Dreisbach, Charles H., Lebanon and Lebanon 

Springs, So. Dak. 
Dungan, George, Otis, Colo. 
Engstrom, Alfred P., Athens and Spencer Brook, 

Minn. 



Essig, Gottlieb, McCook, Kan. 

Fellows, C. B., General Missionary in Minn. 

Fowler, OlinL., Alderton, McMillan, and Orting, 

Wash. 
Grob, Gottfried, Sutton, Neb. 
Harper, Joel, Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Heberlein, Fred. W., West Superior, No. Wis. 
Hill, Charles F., Caseyville and Coal Bluff, Ind. 
Howard, Charles E., Sargent and Westcott, Neb. 
Isakson, Andrew J., Pittsburg, Penn. 
Jackson, Preston B., Sprague, Wash. 
Legler, Jacob, Portland, Or. 
Long, Joseph B., Hot Springs, So. Dak. 
Lumpkin, Wilson, Tryon, Okla. 
Martin, George R.. Spencer, Neb. 
Martini, Fritz W., Little Ferry, N. J. 
Menzi, Ernest U., Carthage, So. Dak. 
Merrill, William H., Kensington, Kan. 
Nichols, John T., Seattle, Wash. 
Noyce, George T., Brunswick and Willowdale, 

Neb. 
Perrin, David J., Springfield, So. Dak. 
Reitinger, Philip, Silver Lake, Minn. 
Rogers, Alonzo, New Whatcom, Wash. 
Shull, Gilbert L., Lafayette, Colo. 
Smith, Andrew J., South Bend, Wash. 
Smith, J. L., Birnamwood, Norrie, and Eland, No. 

Wis. 
Staver, Daniel, Hillside, Gaston, and Greenville, 

Or. 
Steedley. David F., Surrency, Ga. 
Strong, Frank P., Kinsley, Kan. 
Taggart, George A., Portland, Or. 
Ticknor, Owen E., West Cedar Valley, Neb. 
Trchka, Charles J., St. Paul, Minn. 



RECEIPTS 

For account of receipts by State Auxiliary Societies, see pages 134 to 139 



JUNE, 1899 



MAINE— $46.00. 

Alfred, by J. M. Akers 

Biddeford, A Member of the Second, 
by J. L. Crosby 



Brunswick, First Ch. Woman's Miss. 
Assoc, $5 ; Mrs. D. F. Potter, $2, 
by Miss S. M. Field 

Lyman, by J. E. Newton 

Norridgewock, A Friend 



122 



The Home Missionary 



October, 1899 



NEW HAMPSHIRE— $941.97^ which 
legacy, $909.73. 

Franklin. Y. P. S. C. E., by Mrs. L. G. 

Atwood, for Alaska $1000 

Goffstown. by D. Grant 4 15 

Hillsboro Bridge Ch.. A Member 1 00 

Laconia. by J. P. Smith 14 00 

Londonderry, Legacy of Mrs. H. J. 

Sleeper, by C. S. Pillsbury, ex ... 909 73 

Orford, Mrs. I. Willard 3 09 



VERMONT-$ 43 6.62. 

Vermont Dom. Miss. Soc, by W. C. 
Tyler, Treas 

Woman's H. M. Union, Vt., Mrs. R. 
P. Fairbanks, Treas 

Barton •. 

Barton Landing and Brownington. 

Bellows Falls, Ladies' Union 

Burlington, College Street Ch. S. S. 

Brandon 

Cambridge 

Cornwall 

Craf tsbury. North 

Derby, Y. P. S. C. E.. for Salary- 
Fund 

Dummerston, Ladies 

Enosburg 

Guildhall 

Hardwick. Fast 

Hinesburg, Y. P. S. C. E., for Salary 
Fund 

Ludlow 

Milton 

Orwell, Jr. C. E. S., for Cuban 
Work 

Peacham 

Pittsford 

By Mrs. Boardman 

Saxtons River, L. B. S 

Springfield 

Waterbury 

Williamstown 

.Manchester. S. G. Cone 

Peacham, by J. K. Williams 



MASSACHUSETTS — $11,974.99; °i 
which legacies, $6,187.96. 

Mass. Home Miss. Soc, by Rev. E. B. 

Palmer, Treas 

For Cuba, $100 ; Alaska, $5 

Woman's H. M. A., Miss L. D. White, 
Treas. 

For Salary Fund 

Of which from Leicester Ladies' 
Char. Soc. proceeds of a Con- 
ference Dinner, $35.76 ; A 

Friend in N. H., $5 

Williamsburgh, Mrs. H. E. James 



7 1 75 
8 00 

5 00 

59 5° 

6 50 
8 16 
5 5° 
5 00 
2 86 



4 17 
7 00 

3 00 

5 °° 

5 °o 
18 00 

4 00 



7 00 
9 00 

20 00 

5 00 

10 00 

61 00 

8 59 
4 00 



345 03 



4,500 00 
105 00 



Berlin, Jr., C. E., by H. Laybolt, for 

Cuba 

Boston, Estate of J. A. Ambrose, by 
T. Weston 

W. A. Wilde, for Salarv Fund 

Braintree, Y. P. S. C. E., by I. N. 

Holbrook 

East Longmeadow, First, by A. G. 

Crane 

Fairhaven, Legacy of Mrs. Rhoda 

Gifford, by E. Aken, Jr., adm 



344 52 
25 00 



1 50 
8 91 



Feeding Hills, by Miss J. A. Bailey.. $14 00 
Gilbertville, Young People's Mission 

Circle, by Mrs. J. M. Marsh, special 23 06 

Great Barrington, Mrs. C. White 20 00 

Greenwich, H. M. Woods 100 

Hatfield, Estate of S. H. Dickinson, by 

D. W. Wells, trustee 3,80000 

Heath, Mrs. A. L. Snowden " 2 00 

Holyoke, First, by J. H. Wylie, Jr 33 59 

Lee, Z 50 00 

Mittineague, Y. P. S. C. E., by E. H. 

Shepard 6 70 

Monson, by E. F. Morris 2448 

Northampton, Estate of N. Clark. by- 
Miss C. M. Clark, ex 15 00 

Dorcas Soc. of the First, by Mrs. J. 

E. Clark, for Salary Fund 56 25 

Edwards Ch., by G. L. Metcalf 99 78 

North Chelmsford, Rev. J. B. Cook.. 3 00 
Northfield, Mrs. A. M. D. Alexander, 

to const. Mrs. F. J. Stockbridge and 

Mrs. S. C. Holton L. Ms 100 00 

Randolph. Miss A. W. Turner 100 00 

Sheffield, by Dr. A. T. Wakefield 612 

Southampton, by H. G. Healey 45 57 

South Hadley, Estate of M. B. Grid- 
ley, by L. T. Tiffany, ex 29 80 

South Weymouth. Estate of A. S. 

Cobb, by A. E. Vining. ex 1,698 64 

Springfield, South Ch., Rev. P. S. 

Moxom, special. . 2500 

Westfield, First, by M. E. Searle 34 07 

West Springfield, First, by A. H. 

Smith 14 00 

Whitinsville, Mrs. M. F. W. Abbott.. 18 00 
Williamstown, Legacy of Mrs. M. H. 

Hopkins, by Henry Hopkins 100 00 



RHODE ISLAND— $27.08. 
Bristol, First, by P. Skinner, Jr. 



27 08 



CONNECTICUT— $5,392.70; of which 
legacy, $3,000.00. 

Miss. Soc. of Conn., by D. N. Camp. 
Sec 169 72 

Woman's H. M. Union, Conn., Mrs. 
W. W. Jacobs. Treas. 

For Salary Fund : 
Bethel, contents of Ladies' mite 

boxes, by Miss H. H. Seelye 11 60 

Norwich, Broadway Ch., "His 

Loving Service Mission Circle," 

by Miss Ida Sutherland 2 00 

Suffield, by Mrs. I. W. Jones 12 00 

Wallingford, Ladies' Benev. Soc, 

by Miss J. E. Doolittle 2500 

Winsted, First. H. M. Dept. of 

Woman's Union, by Mrs. S. M. 

Blake 7 00 

57 t° 

Berlin, Second, by C. S. Webster, 

special 138 40 

Bridgeport, A Friend of the Cause ... 50 00 
S. S. class of boys in Olivet Ch., by 

L. E. Evers 2 50 

Centerbrook, by J. W. Bushnell 9 59 

Collinsville, Y. P. S. C. E., by K. E. 

Brown, for Alaska 16 35 

Derby. First, by L. Hubbell 11 90 

East Hartford. Legacy of Henry L. 

Goodwin, by F. D. Glazier, ex 3,000 00 

Ellington, by J. M. Talcott 90 75 

Hartford. Pearl Street Ch., bv G. H. 

Stoughton 75 4° 

H. Blanchard 20 00 

Lakeville, Mrs. S. J. Pennock 2 00 



October, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



123 



Middletown, South Ch., by G. A. 

Craig $47 47 

Milford, First, by F. J. B 8 80 

Naugatuck, Y. P. S. C. E., by S. Gould, 

for Alaska 10 00 

New Britain, Mrs. L. J. Pease, spe- 
cial 5 00 

New Haven, First Ch. of Christ, for 

Salary Fund, by M. E. Mersick . . 250 00 
Humphrey Street Ch., by E. E. 

Mix 6335 

Bible School of the Humphrey Street 

Ch., by F. H. Brigham 25 61 

New Hartford, North Ch., by F. B. 

Jones 39 56 

New London, First Ch. of Christ, by 

P. L. Harwood 36 89 

Ellen Tyler Chapman 500 00 

New Milford, First, by C. H. Noble. . 50 00 
Norfolk, by Rev. W. F. Stearns, spe- 
cial.... 165 81 

Mrs. W. F. Stearns, special 15 00 

By S. A. Selden 1947 

North Haven, Y. P. S. C. E., by R. C. 

Stiles, for Alaska 10 00 

Plainville, by C. M. Ryder 48 35 

Portland, First, by H. Kilby 3315 

First, by Rev. W. W. Smith 2 00 

Salisbury, by J. R. Harrison 10 20 

Seymour, Y. P. S. C. E-, by O. W. 

Williams, for Alaska 10 00 

Somerville, by W. H. Billings 8 00 

South Britain, Ladies' Mission Circle, 

by Mrs. M. S. Post 215 

South Norwalk, by E. Beard 329 20 

Hungarian Ch., by Rev. E. Kardos. 10 76 

Staffordville, by H. M. Vaill 5 °° 

Terryville, Friends 20 00 

Vernon Centre, by W. C. Driggs 2 72 

West Avon, by J. A. Hawley, for Sal- 
ary Fund 15 00 

West Torrington, Miss H. M. Hayes. 5 00 

NEW YORK — $2,503.13 ; of which 
legacy, $250. 

Received by W. Spalding, Treas., 

N. Y.: 

Bedford Park 10 00 

Berkshire 24 00 

Binghamton, First 82 87 

Black Creek 2 60 

Brooklyn Hills 15 oo 

Buffalo, First 86 54 

Pilgrim 10 57 

People's 18 30 

Camden 14 51 

Center Lisle 1 35 

Churchville 21 00 

Corning k . . 9 oo 

Denmark 2 85 

East Ashf ord 3 6g 

Bloomfield 10 50 

Ellington 312 

Evans 1 50 

Friendship 600 

Greene 13 64 

Groton City 600 

Henrietta 5 00 

Homer 40 00 

Howells 16 00 

Ithaca. 54 17 

Maine 6 76 

Middletown, North St 31 60 

Millville 6 47 

Morrisville 453 

Mt. Sinai 10 00 

Niagara Falls 6 15 

Northville 38 43 

Ogdensburgr 4 20 

Oriskany Falls, $3.80 ; C. E., $1.20. 5 00 

Oxford 35 56 

Parish ville 500 



Philadelphia, $3.70 ; C. E., $10 $13 70 

Pitcher 3 25 

Portland, additional 1 00 

Remsen 200 

Rensselaer 4 50 

Falls 5 32 

A Friend 1 00 

Rodman n 34 

Sherburne 86 00 

Sidney 5 20 

Sinclairville 5 00 

Smyrna 7 50 

South Granville, Rev. W. R.Curtis. 1 00 

Summer Hill 1020 

Syracuse, Geddes 8 12 

Plymouth 126 03 

Watertown 25 00 

Warsaw 6 00 

Washington Mills 15 00 

A Friend 5 00 



954 °7 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. J. J. 
Pearsall, Treas. : 

Albany, First 30 00 

Helpers' Band 500 

Mizpah 5 co 

Bethany 5 00 

S. S 1000 

Jr. Dept 5 00 

C. E. S 5 00 

Columbus, L. S 3 00 

Crown Point, C. E. S 7 68 

Ellington 5 75 

Maine, Aux 10 00 

Norwich 45 00 

Oswego 15 00 

Syracuse, Plymouth C. E 5 00 

S. S 4 40 

Warsaw 81 12 

Western, N. Y. Assoc. Coll 3 28 

245 23 

Briarcliff, by Rev. A. McCol' 32 35 

Brooklyn, Central Ch., by J. F. Ander- 
son 662 43 

Puritan Ch.,by H. A. W. Goll, for 

Salary Fund .... 57 75 

Y. P. S. C. E. of the Tompkins Ave- 
nue Ch., by E. R. Hilton, for 

Alaska 10 00 

Elmira, Mrs. S. D. Jennings 15 00 

Ithaca, Mrs. J. L. Hunt 60 

Massena Center, Mrs. E. C. R. Sutton. 5 00 
New York City, Manhattan Ch., add'l 

by F. H. Meserve 40 70 

Broadway Tabernacle, A Friend. . . 25 00 

Poughkeepsie, First, by E. E. Deyo.. 88 00 
Syracuse, Legacy of Peter Burns, by 

F. A. Lyman, ex 250 00 

Walton, First, by W. T. Moon 117 00 

NEW JERSEY— $713.88. 

Cedar Grove, Union Ch., by Rev. B. 

F. Bradford 10 00 

East Orange, Swedish Free Ch., by 

Rev. G. W. Leufstedt. ... 10 00 

Glen Ridge, by W. G. Belloni 56 68 

Montclair, First, by J. D. Hegeman.. 230 00 
Newark, Belleville Avenue, by S. Van 

Deyne 98 85 

Westfield, by J. R. Connoly 308 35 



PENNSYLVANIA— $io,i2i.94;of which 
legacy, $10,000. 

Woman's Missionary Union, Mrs. W. 
H. Clift, Treas.: 

Allegheny 

West Spring Creek 



124 



The Home Missionary 



October, 1899 



Woman's H. M. Union of the N. J. 
Assoc, Mrs. J. H. Denison, Treas.: 
Philadelphia, Central Ch., lor Salary 
Fund $49 50 

Chandlers Valley, Free Evan. Scand. 

Ch., by Rev. C. J- Lundquist i 25 

East Smithfield, by O. B. Kellogg 7 55 

Mt. Carmel, First, by Rev R. N. 

Harris 912 

Philadelphia, Legacy of Mrs. E. W. 

S. P. Field 10,00000 

Central Ch., by W. H. Lambert .... 26 00 

Kensington Ch., by N. N. Bormose. 10 00 

Plymouth, Pilgrim Ch., by Rev. W. 

L.Evans 500 

Ridgway. Swedish Ch., Woman's 

Miss. Soc, by C. W. Waid 5 00 

Warren, Scand. Bethel Ch., by Rev. J. 

A. Dahlgren 3 52 



MARYLAND-$6.oo. 
Frostburg, by Rev. G. W. Moore.... 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA-$i 7 .oo. 

Woman's H. M. Union of the N. J. 

Assoc, Mrs. J. H. Denison, Treas. : 

Washington, First, for Salary Fund 

NORTH CAROLINA-; cents. 

King's Mountain, add'l, by M. E. New- 
ton 

ALABAMA-$ 5 .i2. 
Shelby, Rev. A. T. Clarke and family. 

LOUISIANA— $5.00. 
China and Welsh, by Rev. J. B. Fisher 

ARKANSAS- $5.00. 
Ft. Smith, C. Hubbard 



FLORIDA-$ 3 i.oi. 

Haines City, Rev. S. J. Townsend 

Key West, First, by Rev. C. W. Fra- 

zer 

Melbourne, by Rev. E. W. Butler 

Tampa, by Rev. E. P. Herrick 

Tavares, Union Ch., by Rev. L. J. 

Donaldson 

OKLAHOMA-S16.50. 

Kingfisher, Union Ch., by Rev. J. 

Buswell 

Okarche, First, by Rev. J. S. Murphy 
Perry, Lawnview Ch., by Rev. B. F. 

Sewell 



NEW MEXICO-$5.oo. 
Gallup, First, by Rev. P. A. Simpkin 



13 5i 
2 00 

4 00 



6 00 
8 00 



OHIO— $495. 54; of which legacy, $100.00. 

Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser, D.D. 
Cleveland, Euclid Avenue, by J. 

Snow $22 20 

H. Clark Ford, Special 2000 

Union 40 00 

Swedish, by Rev. D. Marcelius... 5 00 

Dayton, by Rev. J. W. Rain 28 30 

Edinburg, by Rev. S. R. Dole 11 00 

Elyria, E. W. Metcalf, special 125 00 

Fairport, L. M. S., by Rev. N. D. 

Ferguson 500 

Fredericksburg, by G. D. Dunham. 23 00 

Secretary, Pulpit supply 5 00 

Sullivan, by Rev. G.Hill 6 66 

Troy, by J. W. Fox 5 25 

Special Gifts for Debt, 1898-9 in 

June 3 00 

299 41 

Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser, D.D. 
Treas. Bohemian Board, Cleveland : 

Cleveland, First, A Friend, by Dr. 
Schaufner 2 00 

Euclid Avenue, by Justin Snow... 13 13 

IS 13 

Ashtabula, legacy of Mrs. C. L. Sper- 
ry, by A. L. Case, ex 100 00 

Bellevue, S. W. Boise 10 00 

Gomer, Welsh Ch., by W. R. Price, to 
const. Thomas W. Rees a L. M 51 00 

Jefferson, Jefferson Kingdom Exten- 
sion Soc. by E. H. Rood 10 00 

Oberlin, W. M. Mead 10 00 

INDIANA-$ 2 6.8 S . 

Dunkirk, Plymouth Ch., by Rev. A. 
O. Penniman 1300 

Elkhart, First, by W. C. Davis 10 30 

Indianapolis, Covenant Ch., by Rev. 
J. R. Mason 1 05 

Jamestown, First, by Rev. J. R. Pres- 
ton 2 so 



ILLINOIS— $944.25, of which legacies, 

$900.00. 

Received by Rev. M. E. Eversz, D.D., 
Supt. Germans, Chicago, 111., col- 
lected 

Peoria, German Ch 

Buda, Estate of J. F. Hyde, by H. T. 

Lay, trustee 

Chicago, M. J. Johnston 

Morrison, Legacy of Ellen S. Brown, 

by D. Gait, ex 

Rockford, Estate of A. H. Perry, by 

M. F. Penfield, ex. 

MISSOURI-$59.oo. 

Brookfield, First, by Rev. W. E. 

Todd 

Kansas City, Southwest Tabernacle, 

by Mrs. L. G. Jeffers 

Noble, by Rev. W. D. Stevens 

St. Louis, Fountain Park Ch., by H. 

Tevis 

Sedalia, Second, by Rev. J B. Too- 

may 

Springfield, German Ch., by Rev. P. 

Burkhardt 



39 25 



October, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



125 



WISCONSIN-$25.oo. 

Clin ton ville, Scand., by Rev. A. Lar- 
son 

Curtiss, German Evan. Zion Ch., by 
Rev. J. Schaerer 

Merrill, by Rev. H. W. Carter 

Milwaukee, Ch.. $5 ; S. S., S3 ; C. E., 
$2, by Rev. J. Jelinek 

Ogdensburg Union, Waupaca, Unity, 
and Easton, Scands., by Rev. C. J. 
Jensen 

West Superior, Hope Ch., by Rev. F. 
W. Heberlein -. 



Friend and Turkey Creek, German 

Ch's, by Rev. G. L. Brakemeyer. . . $15 35 
Holdrege, First, by Rev. F. F. Lewis 14 65 

Inland, by D. Stimbert 4 10 

McCook, German Ch., by Rev. W. F. 

Vogt 10 00 

Nelson, German Ch., by Rev. M. E. 

Eversz 3 00 

Sargent and Wescott, by Rev. C. E. 

Howard.. 2000 

Superior, German Ch., $4.00 : Ladies' 

Miss. Soc, $3.00; Liberty Creek Ch. 

C. E. Soc, 70 cents, by Rev. P. 

Lich 7 70 



1 90 

2 10 



IOWA— $5.00. 
Salem, S. S., by W. H. Bliss 



MINNESOTA-$ 7 8. 5 9. 

Athens and Spencer Brook, Scand. 

Ch's, by Rev. A. P. Engstrom 

Big Lake, Union Ch., by Rev. M. W. 

Williams 

Dora, West Dora Ch., by Rev. I. E. 

Pinney . 

Minneapolis, Pilgrim Ch., by C. A. 
Mayo, to const. C. W. Hayes a 

L.M 

Scand. Evan. Ch., by Rev. C. B. 

Bjuge 

St. Paul, People's German Ch., by 

Rev. W. Oehler 

St. Paul. Hazel Park Ch., Forest St. 
and Tatum Miss's, by Rev. H. A. 

Winona , Scand. ' Ch. ,"by Rev. ' H. F*. 

Josephson 

Winthrop, by Rev. R. S. Cross 



KANSAS-$2 3 5.45. 

Received by Rev. A. C. Hogbin, 
Treas. : 

Almena 4 56 

Buffalo Park 281 

Maple Hill, Y, P. S. C. E 2 00 

Muscotah, Rev. H. L. Marsh 10 00 

Seneca 63 07 

Western Park 1 34 

83 78 

Altoona, $2.0'; ; Scatter Creek, $2.75 ; 

by Rev. J. A. Richards 4 80 

Colwich, by Rev. S. Levick 4 85 

Manhattan, First, by C. P. Blachly-... 18 02 

Wakefield, A Friend 124 00 



NEBRASKA— $173.79. 

Received by H. A. Snow, Treas.: 
Cambridge 

S. S 

Woman's Miss. Soc 

Doniphan, S. S 

Jr. C. E 

Fremont, Y. P. S. C. E 

Kramer, Olive Branch Ch 

Sutton 

S.S 

Seward 

Arlington, J. C. Blackburn 

Blair, by G. E. Haller 

Brunswick and Willowdale, by Rev. 
G. T.Noyce 



NORTH DAKOTA-S78.33. 

Received by Rev. J. L. Maile : 

Fargo, First, by Prof. Curtis. 

Thank-offering, A Friend.. 



5 00 

5 00 



26 

10 


37 
00 


II 


00 


3 

1 


40 
00 


5 


00 
00 


10 24 

3 °7 
16 05 


88 


r 3 




86 


4 


00 


6 


00 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. M. M. 

Fisher, Treas. : 
Fargo, First 

C. E. of the First 

Jamestown, Inter. Y. P. S. C. E.. 

Conference 

Jr. Y.P. S.C. E 

Kelso, Ladies' Miss. Soc 

Wahpeton, Busy Bees Band 

Rev. J. L. Maile 

Antelope, $2.00 ; Dwight, $1.50 ; by 

Rev. O. P. Champlin 

Dawson, Rev. J. E. Jones 

Fargo, Plymouth Ch., by Rev. J. L. 

Rood 

Forman, $2.62; Cayuga, $5.00; by 

Rev. J. T. Killen 

Harwood, Jr. Mission Band, by E. 

Carnine 



SOUTH DAKOTA— $74.80. 

Armour, Y. P. S. C. E., by G. Baird, 

for Alaska 

Beresford, by Rev. H. W. Jamison. . . 
Canton, First, by Rev. J. Hamerson. 
Columbia, United Ch., by Rev. H. W. 

Webb 

Erwin, by Rev. R. M. Coate 

Gann Valley, Duncan and Pleasant 

Valley, by Rev. E. P. Swartout 

Lebanon and Springs, by Rev. C. H. 

Dreisbach . , 

Lesterville, Ward Ch., by Rev. S. A. 

Munneke 

Osceola, by Rev. E. Martin 

Sioux Falls, German Emanuel Ch., by 

Rev. J. Lich 

South Shore, by Rev. P. Winter 



COLORADO— $68.50. 

Received by Rev. H. Sanderson : 

Longmont 

Telluride 

Elyria, Pilgrim Ch., by Rev. C. B. 

Wells 

Flagler, First, by Rev. C. W. Smith. . 

Leadville, by Rev. C. A. Forbes 

Littleton, by Rev. C. H. Harger 

Otis, by Rey, G- Dungan. 



5 


25 


5 


00 


1 


00 


6 


5o 


1 


00 


2 


5o 


4 


00 


4 


46 


29 


7 1 


3 


5° 


10 


00 


10 


00 


7 


62 


7 


5° 



6 


90 


20 


00 


6 


00 


2 


35 


9 


5° 


11 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


2 


°S 


5 


00 


10 


00 



3° 


00 


7 


00 


37 


00 


4 


So 


iS 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


S 


00 



126 



The Home Missionary 



October, ii 



WYOMING-$ S .oo. 

Cheyenne. South Ch.. by Rev. W. N. 
Dunham 



$5 °° 



OREGON— $n. 52. 

Forest Grove, by Rev. C. F. Clapp . . 

Salem, Central Ch., by Mrs. M. A. Van 

Patten 



$9 22 



MONTANA— $6.oo. 

Big Timber, by Rev. E. D. Bostwick 
Columbus and Laurel, by Rev. J. Pope 



NEVADA— $36.00. 
Reno, First, by Rev. F. V. Jones. 



CALIFORNIA-$ I3 8.i 4 . 

Received by Rev. J. T. Ford , 

Los Angeles, East 

Vernon 



Byron, by Rev. D. Goodsell 

Mill Valley, $10.00; Sausalito, First, 

$16.25 ! by R ev - S. R. Yarrow 

National City, First, by Rev. A. C. 

Dodd 

Paso Robles. Plymouth Ch., by Rev. 

S. D. Belt 

Perris, by Rev. G. F. Mathes 

Sierra Valley, by Rev. L. Wallace 

Spring Valley, $10.00; Jamul, $12.00; 

by Rev. I. W. Atherton 



36 00 



31 76 
17 90 



49 66 



26 25 



5 00 

15 25 

1 00 



WASHINGTON-$ 49 .9o. 

Ahtanum Valley, by Rev. L. W. 
Brintnall 

Clayton and Chattaroy, by Rev. F. 
McConaughy 

Columbia City, by Rev. E. P. Dada. . . 

Dayton, C. E. Soc, First, by Rev. M. 
B. Morris 

Endicott. Wash., German Ch.,by Rev. 
J. M. Preiss 

Fidalgo City, Highland Ch.. and 
Rosario, First, by Rev. E. D. Farns- 
worth 

Kirkland, First, by Rev. O. B. Whit- 
more 

Seattle, German Ch., $8.50; and Bal- 
lard, German Ch., $2.40 ; by Rev. E. 
Grieb 

Tacoma, East Ch., by Rev. W. G. 
Olinger 

Walla Walla, German Free Luth. Ch., 
by Rev. J. Hergert 



June Receipts : 



Contributions §13 

Legacies 21 

Annuity 

Income 

Home Missionary 

Literature 



5 00 

1 00 

5 00 
7 50 

3 75 

2 75 

10 90 

5 00 

3 °° 
412 98 

347 69 
436 00 
608 97 

6 90 
2 21 



$35,8i4 75 



JULY, 1899 



MAINE— $43.03. 

Lewiston, Pine Street, by A. L. Tem- 
pleton $20 03 

Skowhegan, Ladies' Miss. Soc, $21 ; 
Somerset Co. Con., $2, by Mrs. L. 
W.Weston 2300 



NEW HAMPSHIRE — $2,677.38; of 
which legacy, $1,000.00. 

Received by Hon. L. D. Stevens, 
Treas. ,'N. H 107 30 

F. C. I. and H. M. Union of N. H., 

Miss A. A. McFarland, Treas. . . . 100 00 
Bristol, towards L. M. of Miss S. 

I. Danforth 1200 

East Sullivan 1 06 

Exeter, Mrs. E. S. Hall 503 00 

Lebanon 21 17 

West Concord, for Alaska 2725 

A Friend 5 00 

£69 48 



Concord. Estate of Mrs. H. A. Goss, 
by Rev. J. L.Hill, adm 

Deerfield, by J. A. Young 

Hampton, by M. A. Getchell 

Manchester. Ladies' Benev. Soc. of 
the First, by Mrs. L. H. McRinnen. 

Milford. First, by Dea. A. C. Crosby. 

North Hampton, from the late E. 
Gove, for Kidder, Inst. Kidder, 
Mo., by F. R. Drake 



1,000 


oo 


6 


25 


9 


37 


25 


00 


3° 


00 



829 98 



VERMONT— $3,486.80; of which leg- 
acy, $3,375.00. 

Burlington, College Street Ch., by G. 

G. Benedict $37 10 

Hartford, by Rev. H. A. Hazen 15 00 

Manchester', by C. K. Bucklin 24 00 

S. G. Cone 20 co 

New Haven, S. S., by I. A. Kingsley, 

for Alaska 1000 

Rupert, Y. P. S. C. E., by J. E. Aus- 
tin, for Alaska 5 co 

Springfield, Estate of Frederick Parks, 

by L. H. Cobb, trustee 3,375 00 

Mrs. M. C. Hutchins " 70 



MASSACHUSETTS — $6,082.22 ; of 
which legacies, $4,930.56. 

Mass. Home Miss. Soc, by Rev. E. 
B. Palmer, Treas. : 
By request of donors, of which for 
Salary Fund, $100; Alaska, $25.. 275 00 

Woman's H. M. A., Miss L. D. White, 
Treas. : 
For Salary Fund 160 00 

Belchertown. Estate of Miss S. C. 

Alden, by Miss H. E. Alden. ex. . . . 1.304 14 

Boston. W. A.Wilde, for Salary Fund 25 00 
Chicopee, Estate of G. S. Chapin, by 

Mrs. S Z. Pease, e.\ 500 00 

Cummington, Y. P. S. C. E., by E. S. 

Pettingill, for Alaska 10 00 

Deerfield, A Friend 10 00 

Dorchester, Second, by E. Tolman... 108 07 



October, ii 



The Home Missionary 



127 



Dudley, Y. P. S. C. E., by L. B. Healy, 

for Alaska $17 00 

Enfield, Estate of Mrs. M. P. Mc- 

Clary, by W. B. Kimball, ex 675 00 

Fitchburg, Miss J. M. Gould 5 00 

Indian Orchard, Evangelical, by W. 

Nield 21 61 

Leominster, Ortho. Ch,, Woodbury 

Fund, by A. O. Wilder 12000 

Ludlow Center, First, by I. T. Jones. 6 co 

Marlboro, Union S. S., by E. M. 

Stratton, for Cuba 26 00 

New Bedford, North Ch., by E. 

Holmes 13 82 

Norton, Trin. Ch., by S. H. Cobb 10 82 

Sheffield, by Dr. A. T Wakefield 13 28 

Somerset, Y. P. S. C.E., by Rev. T. 

F. Norris, for Alaska 5 00 

Springfield, North Ch., by E. E. Ham- 
ilton 100 00 

South Ch., by W. S. Mullins 122 44 

Stockbridge, Mrs. W. R. Fuller 5 00 

Sunderland, by W. L. Hubbard, spe- 
cial 82 62 

Turners Falls, Y. P. S. C. E.,of the 

First, by Miss E. Shieding 5 00 

Westfield, Estate of Mrs. O. C. Baker, 

by H. Fuller, adm 2,451 42 

Williamsburg, Y. P. S. C. E.,by H. 

W. Hill, for Alaska 10 00 



RHODE ISLAND-$45.2o. 

Pawtucket, Weeden Street Ch., by 
W. Midgley . . 500 

Woonsocket, Globe Ch., by L. E. Tay- 
lor 40 20 



CONNECTICUT— $2,428.28 ; of which 
legacies, $1,369.12. 

Miss. Soc. of Conn., by D. N. Camp . 178 80 

Bristol, First, by L. G. Merrick 40 00 

Cheshire, by F. N. Hall 10 50 

Chester, by A. Hall 13 00 

Connecticut, A Friend 2 00 

Fairfield, Legacy of Miss Eliza A. 

Lyon, by M. W. Lyon, adm 203 50 

by E. Osborn, 176 00 

Falls Village, Y. P. S. C. E., by Rev. 

E. W. Hanna 4 50 

Goshen, by A. M. Norton 39 96 

Guilford, Estate of Dr. Alvan Tal- 

cott, by C. Griswold, adm 749 13 

Guilford, First, by E. W. Leete, to 

const. Miss S. L. Chapman a L. M.. 50 00 

Hadlyme, R. E. Hungerford 20 00 

Hartford, F. M. Smith 5 00 

A Friend 3 70 

Ivoryton, by N. D. Miller 18 47 

Lebanon, by Miss J. R. Maxwell 26 40 

New Haven, " M.," Center Ch 10 00 

New London, Estate of J. N. Harris, 
by R. Coit and H. R. Bond, trus- 
tees 41649 

First Ch . of Christ, M . T. Wardwell. 50 00 

New Preston, E. C. W 2 00 

Norfolk, Y. P. S. C.E., by M. Sylver- 

nale, special , 1000 

North Branford, the Luther Chidsey 

bequest, by C. Page 808 

North Stonington, by W. B. Cary 75 00 

Plainville r Mrs. M. E. Morse 500 

Salisbury, by J. R. Harrison 14 37 

South Manchester, by C. E. House.. . 55 38 

Y. P. S. C. E., by E. P. Sherman, 

for Alaska 1000 

Washington, First, by C. B. Nettleton. 93 00 
West Cornwall, D. L. Smith to const. 

Rev. W. C. Ferriss a L. M 50 00 



West Hartford, First Ch. of Christ, by 

E. S. Elmer, $47.73 ; special, $13.41. 

West Torrington, Mrs. A. W. Gerne. 

Westville, by R. T. Grant 



NEW YORK — $4,442.37 ; of which 
legacy, $4,000. 

Received by W. Spalding, Treas. : 

Buffalo, Niagara Square 

Canandaigua 

Carthage, L. Carver 

Coventry ville 

Deer River 

De Ruyter 

Gloversville 

Little Valley 

Madison 

Olean 

Otisco 

Reeds Corners and Rushville 

Volney 

Wilmington 



21 

67 


09 
15 


I 


00 


6 


00 


16 
3 


39 
26 


17 
2 


So 

65 


2 
8 


2S 

94 


5 

1 


57 
86 


10 


00 


2 


5° 



166 16 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. J. J. 

Pearsall, Treas. : 

Angola 10 00 

Brooklyn, Beecher Memorial, special. 5 00 
Clifton Springs, Mrs. A. G. W., for 

Salary Fund 5 00 

Homer, Aux 25 00 

Newburgh, L. S 500 

Northville, C. E. S., for Salary 

Fund 7 00 

New York, Bedford Park, Jr. C. E., 

for Salary Fund 5 00 

Rutland 20 00 

82 00 

Angola, A. H. Ames 5 00 

Brooklyn, Legacy of Laura A. Griggs, 

by R. T. Griggs, ex 4,000 00 

Y. P. S. C. E. of Tompkins Avenue 

Ch., by E. R. Hilton, for Alaska. 10 00 
Cambria Center, S. S., by B. J. Whit- 
well 8 00 

Churchville, by A. D. Stone 26 93 

Mt. Sinai, Y. P. S. C. E., by E. L. 

Randall 1 75 

New York City, O. W. Coe 50 00 

Patchogue, First, by F. Hammond. .. 16 26 

Port Leyden, A. J. Schroeder 10 co 

Rochester, C. L. Smith 30 12 

Rodman, by Rev. J. Kincaid 26 15 

Warsaw, Friends 10 00 



NEW JERSEY-$ 4 i 7 .oo. 

Woman's H. M. Union of the N. J. 
Assoc, Mrs. J. H. Denison, 
Treas. : 
Bound Brook 17 00 

Chester, J. H. Cramer 25 00 

East Orange, " K." 100 00 

Upper Montclair, Chris. Union Ch., 

by M. S. Wilson 27500 



PENNSYLVANIA-$6 4 . 5 9. 

Braddock, Slovac Ch., by Rev. H. A. 

Schauffler 

Guy's Mills. Mrs. F. M. Guy 

Harford, by E. E. Jones. 

Lander, Mrs. H. R. Preston 

Le Raysville, by Mrs. H. C. Lyon 

Neath, by D. Davis 



5 00 
5 00 
10 70 
5 00 
4 75 
3 95 



I2J 



The Home Missionary 



October, i! 



Philadelphia, Park, by G. Harvey 

Pittston, First Welsh Ch., by W. F. 

Howell 

Renovo, Swedish Ch., by Rev. G. O. 

Plant 

Welsh Hill, Y. P. S. C. E. of the Welsh 

Ch., by Miss M. E. Richards 

VIRGINIA-$i8. 35 . 

Falls Church, First, by A. C. Rose- 
besk 

GEORGIA— $12.00. 

Baxley, Friendship Ch., by Rev. G. N. 
Smith 

Duluth. by Rev. W. F. Brewer 

Fort Valley, First, by Rev. J. F. Black- 
burn 

North Rome, by Rev. J. W. Gilliam. . 



ALABAMA-$5. 74 . 

Art, Christian Hill Ch., and Asbury, 

Union Hill Ch., by Rev. S. R. 

Branan 

Clanton, Kingston, and Mountain 

Springs, by Rev. C. A. Milstead . . . 
Cottondale, County Line Ch., and 

Bonifay, Tulip Ch., by Rev. S. B. 

Judah 

Edvvardsville, Salem Ch., and Ox- 
ford, Union Grove, Ch., by Rev. G. 

W. Vaughan 

Hilton, Antioch Ch., Rose Hill. New 

Hope Ch., and Georgianna, Union 

Ch., by Rev. T. A. Pharr 

Lightwood, Union Ch. and Central, 

Equality Ch., by Rev. A. C. Wells. 
Milner, Union Hill Ch., by Rev. F. 

M. Rice 

Opelika, Mt. Jefferson Ch., by Rev. L. 

J. Biggers 

Rays Hill, Pine Grove Ch., by Rev. 

W. C. Culver 

LOUISIANA-55 cents. 
Long Straw, by Rev. J. Brue 

FLORIDA— $28.85. 

Campton, by Rev. W. G. Miller 

Melbourne Ch., $18.60; Y. P. S. C 

E., $7, by Rev. E. W. Butler 

Milligan, Pyrons Chapel, by Rev. T. 

A. Pharr 

Moss Bluff and Panasoffkee, by Rev. 

E. D. Luter 

NEW MEXICO-$6. 5 o. 

White Oaks, Plymouth Ch., by Rev. 
J. A. Hollars 

OKLAHOMA— $15.25. 

Altona, Beulah Ch., by Rev. J. F. 

Robberts 

Hennessey, First, by Rev. I. Cookman 
Ridgeway, $2 ; Salem, Si, by Rev. E. 

P. Owen 

Tecumseh, First, by Rev. C. C. 

Tatum 

West Guthrie, by Rev. G. M. Rarey.. 



$16 



3 75 
1 5° 



2 00 
5 00 



1 00 
I 00 



5° 
25 60 

25 

2 50 



6 50 



1 25 
5 00 



TENNESSEE-$i6. 3 o. 

Memphis, Strangers' Ch., by C. E. 
Coe $16 30 

OHIO— $472.74. 

Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser, D.D. : 

Austinburg, by Martin Parker 1700 

Berlin Heights, by Mrs. Fannie 

Page 7 00 

Cincinnati, Stores 1000 

Cleveland, Plymouth, by S. H. Stil- 

son 2 1 00 

Pilgrim, by H. C. Holt 60 00 

Hough Avenue, by Mrs. L. W. 

Parsons 18 51 

F. E. Prasse 2 00 

Columbus, Mayflower, by M. B. 

Rose 8 60 

Hudson, by Miss E. E. Metcalf 3 00 

Nelson, Miss A. Fuller 1 00 

North Ridgeville, by Rev. J. Staple- 
ton 10 42 

Oberlin, Second, by C. T. Beckwith 60 38 

St. Albans, Children's Day, by Miss 

L. Brooks 2 00 

Springfield, Lagonda Avenue, W. 

M. S., by Rev. W. H. Baker 500 

Tallmadge, S. S., by J. W. Seward, 
in full to const. Miss L. Spring a 

L. M . . 23 08 

Thompson, by Rev. W. O. Town.. 10 00 

Special Gifts for Debt, 1898-9 4 00 

262 99 
Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. G. B. 
Brown, Treas. 

Alexandria 2 50 

Ashland 300 

Cleveland, First 700 

Pilgrim 10 00 

Park, L. A. S 2 50 

Jefferson 2 00 

North Fairfield 2 50 

Toledo, First 10 00 

Wayne 4 25 



43 75 

Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser, D.D., 
Treas. Bohemian Board, Cleve- 
land, Ohio : 
Cleveland, Plymouth, by S. H. Stil- 

son 2 1 00 

Pilgrim, by H. C. Holt 90 00 

in 00 

Fort Recovery, by Rev. J. D. Howell 5 00 

Oberlin, A Member of the First Ch.. . 30 00 

W. M. Mead 2000 

INDIANA-$ 3 . 3 2. 

Cincinnati and Solsberry, by Rev. A. 

E. Peirce 82 

Fairmount, First, by Rev. C. A. Riley 2 50 



ILLINOIS— $359.18. 
Griggsville, Estate of J. D. Philbrick 



MISSOURI— $16.25. 

Kidder, by Rev. A. M. Beman 

Republic, by R. Hathaway 

St. Joseph, Swedish Ch., by Rev. A. 
Swanstrom 



359 l8 



5 25 

6 00 



OctoDer, i! 



The Home Missionary 



129 



WISCONSIN— $3.00. 

Wood Lake and Doctors Lake, Swedes, 
by Rev. F. G. Haggquist $1 75 

Glenwood, Swedish Ch., by Rev. O. 
Ohlson 1 25 

IOWA— $3,006.95. 

Shelby, "A Christian Brother" 3,000 00 

Long Creek, Welsh, by D. D. Davies 6 65 
Red Oak, So. Side Y. P. S. C. E. for 

Bohemian work by Miss A. Nelson . 30 



MINNESOTA— $1,505.63 ; of which leg- 
acy, $1,000.00. 

Received by Rev. J. H. Morley 246 c8 

Alexandria, C. E 5 00 

Austin 27 81 

Biwabik, S. S 1 62 

Cannon Falls 5 00 

Dodge Centre, S. S 1 50 

Ellsworth, S. S 100 

Garvin, S. S 400 

Hudson . 1 00 

Kanaranzi ....". 2 10 

Marshall 4 00 

Mapleton, S. S 2 00 

Medford 3 00 

Minneapolis, Fifth Avenue 6 83 

New Ulm 521 

Northfield 63 09 

Owatonna 9 08 

Ortonville, S. S 400 

Rochester, W. J. Eaton, $50; S. S. 

$1.78 Si 78 

St. Paul, Olivet S. S 6 44 

South Park, S. S 4 28 

Pacific 4 11 

Sauk Rapids 2 75 

Sleepy Eye, $15.29; S. S., $3.40 18.69 

Spring Valley, S. S 6 79 

Wadena, S. S 5 00 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. M. W. 
Skinner, Treas. : 

Austin 12 10 

Custer 10 00 

Duluth, Pilgrim 10 00 

Fairmont 4 56 

S. S 2 49 

Grey Eagle, C. E. Soc 2 00 

Moorhead 5 00 

Minneapolis, Plymouth 8 90 

Lyndale 8 00 

Park Avenue n 83 

Oak Park 5 00 

Northfield, to const. Mrs. J. Wash- 
burn a L. M . . 50 00 

For Cuba 5 00 

Carleton College 15 72 

Pillsbury 1 co 

Robbinsdale 5 50 

C. E 250 

St. Paul. University Avenue ...... 1 25 

Park C. E. Soc. for Alaska 12 00 

Wadena 2 40 

Worthington ' 5 00 

Waterville 1 00 

Winona, First, for Salary Fund .... 85 00 



Less Expenses. . 



266 25 



Minneapolis, Legacy of Miss L. D. 

Lyman, by Lyman Bros 

Edgerton, First, by Rev. P. H. Fisk. 



256 25 



1,000 00 
3 3° 



KANSAS— $28.65. 

Received by Rev. A. C. Hogbin, 
Treas. : 

Comet, S. S 

Severy 

Kansas City, Bethel Ch., by Rev. C. 

E. Cushman 

Lawrence, Pilgrim, by Rev. H. J. 

Withington 

Newton, F. Tangeman 

Pittsburg, by Rev. O. Umsted 

Wichita, Fairmount Ch., by Rev. W. 

A. Bosworth 



NEBRASKA-$88.68. 

Received by H. A. Snow, Treas. : 

W. H. M. U 

Cambridge, Y. P. S. C. E. of the 

First 

Omaha, Pilgrim 



Less Expenses . . . 



Arcadia, by Rev. W. H. Houston 

Butte, First, by Rev. J. Gray. . ._. 

Carroll, Welsh Ch., by Rev. S. Jones. 

Crete, German Ch., by Rev. F. Eger- 

land 

Wilber Bohemian Ch., by Rev. H. 
A. Schauffier 

Danbury, First, by Rev. E. C. Hayes. 

Eagle, by Rev. B. F. Diffenbacher. .. 

Germantown and Oak Grove, German 
Chs., by Rev. F. Woth 

Grant, First, by Rev. O. L. Anderson. 

Hildreth, by Miss N. Neff 

Kramer, German Ch., by Rev. W. 
Suess 

McCook, $6 ; Heys Co., $5, by Rev. 
G. Essig 

Norfolk, Second, by Mrs. C. J. Chap- 
man 

Springfield, by C. E. Smith 



NORTH DAKOTA-$6o.oo. 

Bethany, German Chs., $7.50; Beth- 
esda, $7.50 ; Ebenezer, $7.50 ; St. 
Marks, $7.50; Rev. J. C. Schwaben- 
land, $2.50 

Glen Ullin, German Chs., Bethany, 
Bethesda, St. Marks, and Ebenezer, 
by Rev. J. C. Schwabenland 

Sanborn, Rev. S. F. Porter 



SOUTH DAKOTA-$ioi.6 3 . 

Received by Rev. M. E. Eversz : 

Hosmer, Ger. Emanuel's Ch 

Tyndall, German, Children's Day. 



Academy and Kirkwood, by Rev. L. 

E. Camfield 

Aurora, First, by Rev. T. H. Hill. . . . 
Bon Homme, by Rev. J. H. Olmstead. 
Mission Hill, by Rev. D. B. Nichols. . 
Mitchell, Y. P. S. C. E., by O. K. 

_ Peck 

i lankinton, by Rev. J. Davies 

Spearfish, First, by Rev. J. A. Becker. 



$3 80 
4 60 



8 40 



1 5° 
5 °° 
9 5° 



10 38 



12 63 
4 75 


27 76 
IS 



27 61 

2 OO 
I OO 

1 25 

5 00 

5 00 

2 10 
S 35 

3 00 
11 70 

4 00 

5 00 

11 00 

2 32 
2 35 



12 50 
15 00 



10 00 

5 00 



2 50 
4 7° 



5 00 

5 °o 

6 00 



130 



The Home Missionary 



October, 1899 



Wakonda, by Rev. J . M . Bates 

Webster, by Rev. W. B. Hubbard 

Yankton, Ch., by Rev. W. H. Thrall, 
Supt 

COLORADO— $137.15. 

Received by Rev. H. Sanderson : 

Arkansas Valley Assoc 

Hyde, Ch., sale of organ . . 

Julesburg, Ch. and vicinity 

Silverton. Ch 

Ward, Ch 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. B. C. 

Valentine, Treas 

Denver, Second 

Plymouth, Thank-offering 

Villa Park, add'l Thank-offering. 

Longmont, Thank-offering 

Pueblo, Pilgrim 

Montrose, Union Ch., by Rev. C. W. 

Longren 

Red Cliff, Minturn and Gilman, by 

Rev. N. H. Hawkins 

WYOMING-Si.75- 
Big Horn, by Rev. D. G. Bruce 

MONTANA-$ 7 .oo. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. W. S. 
Bell, Treas. : 

Castle, Children's Miss. Band 

Helena 

IDAHO-$i 3 .2 5 . 

Challis. First, by Rev. G. Foster 

Troy, Swedish Ch., by Rev. J. Ester- 
borg 



$7 25 
5 00 



3 


50 


15 


00 


20 


00 


20 


00 


5 


00 


63 


5° 


5 


95 


5 


00 


25 


00 


2 


15 


6 


10 


S 


80 


5° 


00 


13 


65 


10 


00 



1 75 



2 


00 


5 


CO 


7 


00 


9 


25 


4 


00 



CALIFORNIA-$ 4 8.oo. 

East Los Angeles, Mrs. J. E. Cush- 

man $20 00 

Monrovia, by Mrs. M. L. Taylor 3 50 

Paradise, Rev. J. B. Ives 10 00 

Rocklin, by Rev. W. C. Day 2 00 

San Diego and La Mesa, by Rev. 

T. R. Earl 2 50 

Santa Barbara, Y. P. S. C. E., by Mrs. 

H. G. Parish, for Alaska 1000 

OREGON-$ 4 o.5i. 

Condon, First, by Rev. W. Hurlburt 10 00 

Eugene, First, by Rev. R. C. Brooks. 15 50 
Portland, Miss. Ave. Ch., by Rev. G. 

A. Taggart 1285 

St. Helens, $3.50; Yankton, $1.16, by 

Rev. C. E. Philbrook 466 

Mrs. Little 1 00 

Wilsonville, by Rev. A. Brady 5 50 

WASHINGTON— $43.70. 

Aberdeen, Swedish Ch., by Rev. M. 
Peterson 2 50 

Almira, Beulah Ch , by Rev. W. E. 
Young 3 20 

Edmonds, First, by Rev. W. A. Ar- 
nold 5 00 

Marysville, First, by Rev. R. Bushell. 5 00 

New Whatcom, Tabernacle, by C. S. 
Teel 12 50 

Olympia, First, by Rev. W. A. Rem- 
ele 3 00 

Seattle, Taylor Ch., by Rev. G. H. 
Lee 2 50 

Snohomish. First, by Rev. B. S. Win- 
chester 5 00 

Washougal, by Rev. G. Baker 5 00 

July Receipts: Contributions $9,70204 

Legacies 16,033 86 

Annuity 3,068 53 

Interest 2,481 50 

Home Missionary 17 09 

Literature 10 



31,304 02 



AUGUST, 1899 



MAINE— $491-05. 

South Bridgton, by T. B. Knapp $2 65 

Waldoboro. John H. Lovell, in mem- 
ory of Mrs. Lovell 48840 

NEW HAMPSHIRE -$1,44307; of 
which legacy, $270. 

Received by Rev. A. De Barritt : 
Special for Cuba : 

Laconia Cong. Ch 985 

Mrs. M. L. Read, $5: Mrs. W. 
Smith, $s ; Mrs. Batchelor, 

$2; Mrs. C. E. Lewis, $s 

Peoples' Ch 

Y. M. C. A., Mr. Hurst 

Alstead Centre, Ladies' Circle, by 

Mrs. I. L. Putnam 

Francestown, Legacy of William But- 

terfield, by G. Kingsbury, Ex 

Estate of J. M. Bradford, by S. D. 

Downes, Ex 

North Hampton, from the late E. 
Gove, by F. R. Drake and Abbie 
Gove, special 1,12272 



17 


00 


5 


25 


9 


25 


41 


35 


3 


00 


70 


00 


200 


00 



Orford, Class in S. S., by Mrs. A. W. 
Newcomb 



VERMONT-$67. 9 o. 

Vermont Domestic Miss. Soc, by W. 

C. Tyler, Treas 40 34 

Ludlow, Y. P. S. C. E., by L. A. 

Walker 1000 

New Haven, A Friend 500 

Stowe, C. E. Soc, by Mrs. A. H. 

Cheney, for Alaska 7 03 

Williston, by W. M. Barber 5 53 



MASSACHUSETTS — $4,569.07 ; of 
which legacies, $3,372.14. 

Mass. Home Miss. Soc, Rev. E. B. 
Palmer. Treas. : 

For Western Foreign work 699 60 

By Request of Donors 2500 

For Cuba 5 °° 

729 60 



October, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



131 



Received by Rev. A. De Barritt : 
Special for Cuba : 
Boston, Mr. Shaw, C. E. Tiemont 

Temple $5 oc 

Duxbury, Pilgrim Ch 185 

Hanover, Mrs. Watkin, $1; Rev. 

J. Wild, $1 2 00 

Humarock, Miss W. E. Ely, $1; 

Mrs. S. S. Wallace, $1; Mrs. E. 

R. Reed, $1 3 00 

Kingston, Rev. Mr. Crowell 7 00 

Manomet, Cong. Ch 9 00 

Marshfield Hills, Capt. Tilden, $1, 

Mr. Wetherby, 50c, W. T. Hall, 

$1; Mrs. E. B. Macomber, $1.. 3 50 

Melrose, C. R. Jones 5 00 

Cong. Ch., Dr. Simms 44 00 

North Marshfield, Miss A. Damon. 10 80 

Baptist Ch 1245 

South Marshfield, First Baptist 

Ch 12 69 

116 29 
Boston, W. A. Wilde, for Salary 

Fund 25 00 

L. T. B 200 00 

Charlton, Legacy of Andrus March, 

by A. March, Ex 462 50 

Dorchester, Second, by Miss E. Tol- 

man 25 00 

Dracut, First, by C. L. Hodge 2 55 

Georgetown, Estate of Lucy H. Dole, 

by M. G. Tenney, Adm 691 95 

Great Barrington, Y. P. S. C. E., of 

the First, by L. A. Fuller , 2 50 

Greenfield, Estate of E. M. Bardwell. 1 00 

Leicester, Estate of H. W. Chilson, 

by Dr. C. G. Stearns 300 00 

Lowell, Estate of L. R. Parker, by F. 

H. Wiggin 266 69 

Monson, by E. F. Morris 22 29 

Newbury, Y. P. S. C. E. of the First, 

by Rev. C. S. Holton. for Alaska.. 6 70 

Paxton, Estate of Mrs. L. E. Morton, 

by H. W. Lincoln, Adm 1,150 00 

Phillipston, Mrs. M. P. Estey 500 

Readville, Blue Hill Chapel, by B. 

McKendry 700 

South Hadley Falls, In His Name 30 00 

Sunderland, S. S., by A.T. Montague 25 00 

Wilbraham, Legacy of A. L. Stebbins, 

by E. J. Cummings, Ex 50000 



CONNECTICUT— $1,952.93. 

Miss. Soc. of Conn., D.N. Camp, Sec. 853 25 
Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. W. W. 
Jacobs, Treas. : 

Kent, for Salary Fund 50 00 

Barkhampstead, Miss L. M. Harmon. 1 00 

Bloomfield, by F. C. Bidwell 5 00 

Columbia, by J. Hutchins 28 31 

Gilead, by A. W. Hutchinson 26 20 

Meriden, Center Ch., by W. F. Smith. 75 00 
New Haven, Center Ch., by F. T. 

Bradley 444 17 

United Ch., A Friend, by C. E. P. 

Sanford 1 00 

Northford, by W. Maltby 23 00 

Norwich, Park Ch., by H. L. Butts... 274 37 

Salisbury, by J. R. Harrison 31 41 

W. B. H. M., by Mrs. L. Warner... 1300 
Sound Beach, First, by Mrs. P. Heu- 

sted 2500 

South Norwalk, add'l 1 50 

Stratford, of which $4 from Oro- 

noque, mon. con. by Mrs. S. A. 

Talbot in full to const. Mrs. S. A. 

Fairchild a L. M 36 22 

Unionville, Woman's Soc, by Mrs. 

F. A. Chamberlin 13 50 

Windsor, First, by S. H. Barber 51 00 



NEW YORK — $1,086.58; of which 
legacies, $715.00. 

Received by Wm. Spalding, Treas. 

N.Y. H. M.Soc: 

Black Creek $7 84 

Buffalo, Fitch Menvl S. S 8 00 

Cambridge, S. S 3 00 

Glovers ville 23 50 

Jamestown, C. E. S 10 00 

Java 3 70 

Java Village 3 30 

Lockport, First 31 00 

Mannsville 10 00 

Moriah 8 00 

Estate, Mrs. Cyrenus Reed 10 00 

Newburg 32 50 

Norwood " 42 00 

Oswego Falls, C. E. S 5 00 

Rensselaer Falls 10 09 

Rutland 525 

Sidney, C. E. Soc 5 50 

Warsaw, C. E. S 10 00 

West Winfield 7 50 



PENNSYLVANIA— $73.95. 

Received by Rev. A. De Barritt: 
Special for Cuba: 

Philadelphia 

Central Ch 

Miss Crowell 

Trinity Baptist 

Clifton Heights First Presb. Ch. 

Ninth Presb. Ch 

Pilgrim Cong. Ch 



Cambridge Springs, Mrs. A. B. Ross. 
Chandlers Valley, Scand. Free Evan. 

Ch., by Rev. C. J. Lundquist 

Philadelphia, Bethany Ch., by Miss E. 

Collins 

Warren, Swedish Beth. Ch., by Rev. 

F. Nilson 



236 18 



Received by Rev. A. De Barritt: 

New York City : Mrs. Dickenson, 

$10: Mrs. C. Philips, $25; H. E. 

Geary, $5; Dr. R. Dimberry, $5; 

J. R. Livermore, $5; Mr. Purdy, 

$25, Special for Cuba 75 00 

East Bloomfield, First, by H. S. Mc- 

Glashan 17 48 

Huntington, Mrs. C. D. Dill 10 00 

Jamestown, Legacy of Samuel Kid- 
der, by S. P. Kidder, Adm 500 00 

Orient, by M. B. Brown 12 88 

Orient Point, Life Member 10 00 

Perry Center, Estate of Mrs. S. C. Al- 
ton, by L. A. Hayward, Ex 15 00 

Syracuse, Legacy of M. E. Gere, by 

M. J. Gere, Ex 200 00 

Warsaw, by Miss M. Barber 10 04 



NEW JERSEY-$8o.go. 

Received by Rev. A. De Barritt: 
Special for Cuba : 
Camden, Mrs. A. Wood, $1; W. W. 

Bacon, $1.50 

Guttenburg, C. H. Fink, $7; A. 
Chavant, $5 ; J. B. Williams, 

$5 ; C. A. Morton, $5 

Grove Ch., C. E. Soc 

Montclair, Dr. H. M. Ayres, $10; C. 
W. Anderson, $25 

Cedar Grove, by Rev. B. F. Bradford 
New Brunswick, M. H. Parker 



69 go 
6 00 
5 00 



II 


06 


9 


94 


5 


00 


7 


20 


10 


OO 


6 


41 


5 


CO 


54 


70 


10 


00 


1 


25 


5 


00 


3 


00 



132 



The Home Missionary 



October, i! 



MARYLAND— Legacy, $4,509.89. 

Baltimore, Estate of Mrs. M. R. Haw- 
ley $4,509 89 



VIRGINIA-$i. 7 o. 
Snowville, Nancy M. Richardson. 



GEORGIA— $3.00. 

Columbus, First, by Rev. G. W. Cum- 
bus 



Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser, D. 
D., Treas. Bohemian Board, 
Cleveland, Ohio : 
Cleveland, Euclid Avenue, by Jus- 
tin Snow 

Woman's H. M. Union, by Mrs. G. 
B. Brown, Treas.: 

Painesville 

Miss. Soc 

Unionville, S. S 



Cleveland, W. O. Weeden 
Tallmadge, " Extra ". ... 



$34 



9 


50 


3 


50 


5 


00 


52 


00 


25 


00 


5 


00 



LOUISIANA— $6.15. 
Vinton, by A. E. Sayers. 

FLORIDA— $5.35. 



Eden, Union Ch., by Rev. L. J. Saw- 
yer 

New Smyrna, by Rev. W. B. Hatha- 
way 



TEXAS— $5.00. 
Port Arthur, First, by Rev. W. Sloan. 

OKLAHOMA— $11.45. 

Mt. Hope and Cimarron, by Rev. C. J. 

Rives 

Perkins, First, by Rev. W. Full 

Perry, Lawnview Ch., by Rev. B. F. 

Sewell 

Seward, by Rev. L. S. Childs 



6 15 



3 °o 

2 35 



1 25 
4 7° 



2 50 

3 °° 



INDIANA— $7.25. 

Received by Rev. E. D. Curtis : 
Bremen 5 00 

Indianapolis, Covenant Ch., by Rev. 
J.R.Mason. 125 

Terre Haute, Second, by Rev. J. M. 

Sutherland 1 co 



MISSOURI— $42.03. 

Webster Grove. First, by Dr. C. L. 

Armstrong 37 03 

Springfield, Germans, Fred. Weiss, 

$3.00 ; and Rev. P. Burkhardt, $2.00 5 co 



WISCONSIN $17.00. 

Hartford, by C. M. Blackman, for 
Cuba 

Ogdensburg, Union, Waupaca, Unity 
and Eastern Scands., by Rev. C. J. 



Jensen . 



ARIZONA-$2o.oo. 

Nogales, Ch., 11.50; S. S., $4.75; C. 

E. Soc, $1.75 ; by Rev. J. H. Heald 

Tempe, Second, by Rev. J. Soza 



IOWA— $31.45. 

Bridgewater, H. V. Clark 

West Bend, German. $6.45 ; A Friend. 
$15; by Rev. M. E. Eversz 



OHIO— $252.37. 

Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser, D. D. : 
Ashtabula, Swedish, by Rev. C. A. 

Widing 260 

Berea, by S. L. Root 10 80 

Burton, by W. H. Hale 1200 

Cincinnati, Storrs, colls, in Aug 16 54 

By Rev. E. R. Latham 4 46 

Cleveland, Euclid Avenue, by Justin 

Snow 8 99 

Isle St. George, by R. Sifield 5 00 

Painesville, by Rev. A. F. Skeele. .. 30 35 

Secretary, Pulpit service 1667 

Toledo, Birmingham, by Mrs. L. V. 

Holton 300 

West Andover, by Henry Holcomb. 5 00 
Weymouth, Mrs. J. Cook, by Rev. L. 

W. Mahn 1 50 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. G. B. 

Brown, Treas. : 

Andover 

Austinburg 

Cleveland, Euclid Ave., C. E 

Hough Avenue 

Trinity 

Marietta, Harmar 

Painesville 



116 91 



4 00 

3 °o 
15 00 
19 96 

3 00 

4 00 
4 5o 



MINNESOTA— $62.91. 

Athens and Spencer Brook, Swedish 

Chs., by Rev. A. P. Engstrom 

Belgrade, First, by L. B. Steel 

Benson, Pilgrim Ch., by Rev. J. L. 

Nott 

Detroit City, by Rev. E. L. Brooks. . 
Granite Falls and Belview, by Rev. 

J. Earl 

Lakeland, by Rev. A. A. Davis 

Minneapolis, Scand. Evan. Ch., by 
Rev. C. B. Bjuge 

Bethany Ch., by Rev. S. G. Updyke 

St. Paul, Park Ch., add'l, by W. B. 

Geery 

German People's Ch., by Rev. W. 

Oehler 

Silver Lake, Bohemian Ch. S. S..$i3; 

J. R. Ierabek, $10, by Rev. P. Rei- 

tinger 

Walnut Grove, Union Ch. of Christ, 

by Rev. H. J. Jager 

Winthrop, German, by Rev. M. E. 

Eversz , 



KANSAS-$ 3 . 7 5- 



5 45 
10 00 



2 25 
2 50 



53 46 Stafford, by Rev. M. W. Woods. 



October, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



133 



NEBRASKA— $56.25. 

Beaver Creek, German Chs., $2 ; Lib- 
erty, $1 35 ; Superior, L. Miss. Soc, 
$3 ; by Rev. P. Lich 

Bloomfield, First, by Rev. C. Ander- 
son 

Monroe and Wattsville, by Rev. W. 
Hauptmann 

Petersburg', by Rev. J. Roberts . . 

Scribner, Mrs. H. A. Bowles 

Urbana, by Rev. R. S. Pierce 

NORTH DAKOTA— $15.00. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. M. M. 
Fisher, Treas. : 

Gardner Miss. Soc 

Michigan City, Miss. Soc. 

Wahpeton Conference 

Antelope and Dwight, by Rev. O. P. 

Champlin 

Hankinson, by Rev. W. H. Gimblett. 

SOUTH DAKOTA— $38.48. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. F. M.Wil- 
cox, Treas. : 

Badger 

De Smet 

Oahe 

Rapid City 

Vermillion 

Yankton 

M.B 



Canton, First, by Rev. J. Hamerson. . 
Columbia, United Ch., by Rev. H.W. 

Webb 

Mitchell, by Rev. D. R. Tomlin.. — 

Springfield, by Miss E. K. Henry 

Waubay, First, by Rev. R. F. Black. 

COLORADO— $66.32. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. B. C. 

Valentine, Treas 

Highland Lake, Ch. of Christ 



Elyria, Pilgrim Ch., by Rev. C. B. 

Wells 

Globeville, First German Ch., by Rev. 

A. Traudt 

Harman, Union Ch., by Rev. H. M. 

Skeels 

Leadville, by Rev. C. A. Forbes 

Otis, by Rev. G. Dungan 

WYOMING— $11.33. 

Buffalo, Union Ch., by Rev. J. P. 

Dyas 

Douglas, by Rev. W. E. M. Stewart.. 

UTAH-$2. 5 o. 
Robinson, by Rev. F. Foster 



IDAHO— $10.00. 

Pocatello, Jr. Y. P. S. C. E. of the 
First, by G. H. Perry, for Alaska.. 



CALIFORNIA-$539.20. 

Received by Rev. J. K. Harrison : 

Auburn 

Berkeley, First 

Eureka , 



i'635 
18 40 



5 50 
8 00 



2 50 

3 °° 

3 00 

8 50 

4 00 
2 50 



12 05 
5 60 

1 25 

5 °° 
10 91 
""3 67 



47 35 
2 65 



50 00 
3 85 

1 77 

5 7° 
3 00 

2 00 



6 33 



Lockef ord $2 00 

Niles, C. E. Soc 2 65 

Oakland, C. E. Soc of the Second. . 5 00 
San Francisco, First, by H. W. 

Fargo 5 00 

S. S 10 00 

C. E 5 00 

Plymouth, C. E. Sec 23 75 

Mrs. G. Mooar 5 co 

144 90 
Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. J. M. 
Haven, Treasurer : 

Campbell 12 00 

Oakland , First 200 00 

Pacific Grove 5 50 

San Francisco, First 67 65 

Bethany, by King's Daughters 7 5c 

Plymouth 615 

Suisun : 8 00 



Woman's H. M. Union, Southern 
California, Mrs. M. M. Smith 
Treas. : 
For Salary Fund : 

Pasadena, North 

First, Y. P. S. C. E 

Riverside, of which $10 from 
Mrs. Atwater 



Alpine, C. E., by Rev. J. L. Pearson. 
Compton, First, by Rev. S. H. 

Wheeler 

Fresno, German Ch., by Rev. J. Leg- 

ler 

Norwalk, Bethany Ch., by Rev. G. H. 

DeKay 

San Francisco, First Ch., W. Wilson, 

by Rev. F. B. Perkins 

Santa Rosa, Wallace, S. S., by C. W. 

Gregg 

Stockton, Rev. J. C. Holbrook 

OREGON— $57.15. 

Received by Rev. C. F. Clapp : 
Dora 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. C. F. 
Clapp, Treas 

Bethany, Wm. Graff, Ger., by Rev. 

M. E. Eversz 

Ontario, by Rev. H. Burr 

Willsburg, First, by Rev. G. A. 

Rockwood 

WASHINGTON— $18.25. 

Edison, by Rev. E. D. Farnsworth.. . 
Endicott, German Ch., by Rev. J. M. 

Preiss 

Puyallup, by Rev. A. J. Bailey 

Riverside, $2.75 : Skokomish, Si. 75, 

by Rev. M. Eells 

Roy, First, by Rev. L. W. Brintnall.. 
Spokane, Swedish Ch., by Rev. J. J. 

Huleen 

Union, Mrs. S. M. Eells 

TURKEY-$ S .oo. 

Constantinople, Mrs. H. L. Wash- 
burn 



August Receipts 



16 50 
45 co 
25 00 



Contributions 

Legacies 

Annuity and Int.. 
Home Missionary. 



306 80 



5 


00 


10 


00 


27 


00 


42 


00 


5 


00 


12 


5° 


5 


00 


2 


00 


10 


00 


1 


00 


10 


00 



5 00 

35 45 



5 00 

5 7° 

6 00 



3 5° 
1 5° 



4 5° 

5 00 



3 °° 
25 



5 °° 

. $6,697 2 ° 

8,867 03 

5*3 °° 

. 9 25 

Si6,o86 48 



134 



The Home Missionary 



October, ii 



CONTRIBUTIONS OF CLOTHING, ETC. 



Received in June 



Brooklyn, N. Y., Mrs. M. E. Richards, 

box. 
Gardiner, Me., by Mrs. J. M. Quimby, 

barrel 

Naugatuck, Conn., Ladies' Aid Soc, by 

Caroline L. Soule, box 



$50 00 
25 00 



North Fairfield, O., Ladies' Miss. Soc, 
by Virginia Irwin, box $2400 



Received in July 



Norwich, N. Y., Woman's Working 
Asso. of First Ch., by Mrs. George 
Marr, barrel 

Plymouth, N. H., by Mrs. F. G. Clark, 
barrel 



Terryville, Conn.,Benev. Soc, by Mrs. 
W. H. Scott, box and freight 



$53 73 
$131 26 



Received in August 



De Ruyter, N. Y., Woman's Miss. Soc. 
of First Ch., by Mrs. H. D. Messenger, 
barrel 

Lancaster, N. H., Ladies' Miss. Soc, by 
Mrs. P. F. Marston, box 



26 84 



Saratoga Springs, N. Y., Mrs. E. P. 

Ripley, box 

Warsaw, N. Y., Home Miss. Soc, by 

Mary D. Jenks, box 



43 



$225 27 



AUXILIARY STATE RECEIPTS 



MASSACHUSETTS HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 



Receipts of the Massachusetts Home Missionary Society in June, 1899. 

B. Palmer, Treasurer 



Rev. Edwin 



Amherst, A Friend $3000 

Andover, West, by F. S. Boutwell 25 00 

Attleboro, Second, S. School, by Daviu 

L. Low 1588 

Barnstable, West, by Rev. E B. French 5 00 

Boston, Mt. Vernon, by Sanford Keith. 60 00 

Richardson, Mary T. B 500 

Roxbury, West, So. Evan, by Mrs. C. 
H. Botsford 153 50 

Swede Evan., by G. F. Sodergren.. . . 10 59 

Brookline, Harvard, by Jas. H. Shap- 

leigh 65 21 

Harvard, by Jas. H. Shapleigh, for 

Italian mission 19 57 

Cambridge, First, by Geo. S. Saunders 

(in part) 250 00 

First, Shepard, S. S.. by H. T. Burrage 20 00 

Pilgrim, by N. H. Holbrook, for Arm. 
work fiii 2^ * 

Chelsea, Central^ by L. H. Watts 83 76 

" Cuba " 100 00 

Cummington, West, by Rev. J. W. 

Strout, over-payment ret'd 1? 50 

Dedham, First, S. School, by Hattie A. 

Guild 7 19 

Enfield, by L. D. Potter 40 00 

Everett, First, by R. A. Rideout 27 03 

Falmouth, Eldred, Hannah, Estate of, 

by S. C. Darling, Esq., att'y, net 425 00 



Fitchburg, Rollstone, by David Lowe. . 

Foxboro, Bethany, by Horace Carpen- 
ter 

Framingham, Plymouth, by John H. 
Temple 

Gardner, First, by D. H. Rand 

Grafton, Evan., by Geo. K. Nichols. . . . 

Hale. E. J. M., fund. Income of 

Hanson, by Miss Abbie J. Clark 

A Friend in 

Lenox, C. E. Soc, by A. C. Atwood, for 
Alaskan work 

Lowell, First Trin., by I. W. Bisbee, for 
local Arm. work, §25.00.* 

John St., by Wm. Morey 

Pawtucket, by J. J. Colton 

Lynnfield Center, by Rev. Geo. E. Free- 
man 

Marion, A Friend 

Mass., A Friend 

Montague, First, by Sanford Marsh.... 

Monterey, by Jessie A. Townsend 

Newbury. First, by E. Perkins 

New Marlboro, by Gilbert Hollister 

Newton (Center), First, by J. E. Rock- 
wood 

Northampton, First, by James H. Searle 

Northboro, Evan., by Miss A. A. Adams 

Pepperell, by Chas. Crosby — 



$37 59 
20 00 

57 9° 
67 39 
59 9 6 
54 22 
2 25 



45 


78 


15 


75 


18 


83 


2 


CO 


8 


00 


25 


00 


10 


5° 


20 


J 9 


5 


02 


144 


06 


215 


75 


37 


30 


22 


45 



* Received and credited on special account. 



October, i< 



The Home Missionary 



135 



Petersham, C. E. Soc, by Mrs. G. L. 

Perry Si 35 

Phillipston, by Mrs. Mary P. Estey 6 65 

Plainfield, by S. W. Clark 6 70 

Quincy, Wollaston, by J. A. Barbour... 12 73 

A Friend 5 00 

Richmond, C. E. Society, by C. H. Dorr 2 08 

Rochester, North, by Geo. H. Randall.. 3 00 

Shrewsbury, by Henry Harlow 13 00 

Somerville, Highland, bv B. F. Allen. . . 15 35 

Southfield, by H. W. Palmer 5 16 

Springfield, Emmanuel C. E. Society, by 

Rev. D. L. Kebbe 1 00 

Olivet, by J. W. Nourbourn 21 12 

Taunton, Union, S. S.. by Geo. W. Read 8 58 

Wakefield, by W. P. Preston 26 00 

Wall fund, for investment 4,000 00 

Waltham, Swede Cb., by G. Isaacson . . 6 00 

Watertown, Phillips, by Moses Fuller. . 86 70 

Wellesley Hills, by L. V. N. Peck 11 00 

Westfield, Second, by R. L. Scott 21 22 

Westport, Pacific Union, S. S., by J. C. 

Macomber 13 18 



Weymouth Heights, First, by Rufus 
Bates 

Weymouth and Braintree, by E. H. 
Bolles 

Woburn, A Friend, by Rev. W. G. Pud- 

defoot 

First, Ladies' Char, and Reading So- 
ciety, by Mrs. M. T. Jameson to 
const. Mrs. C. D. French a L. M 

Worcester, Pilgrim, by F. L. Stetson. .. 

Plymouth, Ladies' Miss. Aux., by Mrs. 

R. P. Beaman 

Zoar, People of, by Rev. W. R. Joyslin. 

Woman's Home Missionary Association, 
by Miss L. D. White, Treas.: 
Grant for salary of Miss J. Junek, 
Ware, $30.00.* 



Home Missionary. 



$28 00 

34 52 
S °° 



30 00 
72 20 

16 15 

3 °° 



,685 65 
1 5° 



1,68 7 *5 



Received in July, 1S99 



Andover, South, by John Alden. to- 
wards salary of Rev. R. B. Wright, 
Boise City, Idaho 

Boston, Dorchester, Second 

Dorchester Village, Friends 

Roxbury, Highland, by Rev. W. R. 

Campbell (addl.) 

West, So. Evan., by Mrs. C. H. Bots- 
ford (addl.) .. 

Braintree, South, by H. B. Whitman. . . 

Brockton (Campello), South, by Frank 
P. Mills 

Brookline, Harvard, by Jas. H. Shap- 
leigh, for Italian mission , 

Buckland, by Ella M. Trow 

Cambridgeport, Pilgrim, by N. H. Hol- 
brook 

Chelsea, First, by C. A. Bacon 

Danvers, Maple St., by C. G. Mears.... 

Dedham, First, by G. W. Humphrey. . . 

Dunstable, C. E. Society, by Jas. E. 
Kendall 

Easton, Evan., by J. W. Gilliott 

Everett, Courtland St., by A. T. Finch. 

Fall River, Broadway, by G. Parkinson 

Fitchburg, Calvinistic, by D. B. Dole.. 

Foxboro, Phelps, Mrs. Mary N., to 
const. Mrs. John Carpenter L. M 

Frost, Rufus S. , fund, Income 

Georgetown, Memorial, by Henry Hil- 
liard 

Gloucester, Trinity, by Joseph O. Proc- 
ter 

Granville, West, by Rev. S. B. An- 
drews 

Great Barrington, First, by Clarence R. 
Sabin 

Hadley, First, by Miss Agnes Ayres 

Holbrook, Winthrop, by F. W. Blanch- 
ard, to const. Ann Maria Thayer L. 
M. of C. H. M. S 

Hubbardston, by Lucy H. Grimes 

Huntington, First, by C. H. Kirkland.. 

Ipswich, Linebrook, by J. H. Tenney. . 

Jessup fund, Income 

Kingston, Mayflower C. E. Soc, by 
Miss Sophia Lewis, for Alaskan work 

Lakeville, Precinct Ch., $15.00; S. S, 
$5.00. by T. P. Paull 

Leicester, First, by David Bemis 

Leominster, C. E. Soc, by E. M. Bur- 
ditt 

Leverett, First, by S. K. Field 



|>IOO 00 

20 00 
6 co 



100 


00 


45 


4° 


54 


72 


10 


42 


4 

156 


32 
16 


137 45 


7 
26 


5° 


11 


00 


15 


00 


IO 


00 


5° 


00 


3° 


00 


15 


57 


5° 


00 


10 


75 


31 
37 


°3 
Co 


72 


°5 


10 


00 


5 


00 


11 


5° 


150 


00 


10 


00 


20 


00 


^5 


12 


6 


00 


15 29 



Littleton, Orth., by Miss A. J. Cutter. . 

Lowell, First, by F. C. Lawrence 

Lunenburg, Evan., by E. S. Francis 

Lynn. Chestnut St., by Geo. E. Sargent 

By Rev. A. M. Moore, for Rev. G. H. 

Adalian 

Maiden, Blank 

Marlboro, Union, by Wm. A. Dudley... 

Medway, Village, by Rev. R. K. Har- 
low, in part 

Melrose, Highlands, by Chester A. 
Coombs 

Middleboro, First, by E. W. Fessenden 

Millbury, First, by Miss Carolyn C. 
Waters 

Newburyport, Belleville, by Rev. A. W. 
Hitchcock to const. L. Ms. Moses 
Williams, Alice Moulton, Lena H. 
Winn, Eliza A. Jackman, Martha E. 
Jackman, Gertrude Lunt, Mrs. E. 
K. Batchelder, and Mrs. H. Marion 

Carson 

North, by J. B. Creasey 

New Salem, by Rev. A. V. House 

Newton, Eliot, by G. N. Putnam 

Northbridge, Whitinsville, E. C. A. 
Day Band, by Mrs. C. E. Whitin 

Norwood, First, by Edson D. Smith 

Parkhurst, E. C, fund, Income 

Peabody, South, by Benj. N. Moore 

Pittsfield, Pilgrim S. S.. Prim. Dept., by 

Harriet L. Kirtland 

South, by F. E. Peirson 

Plympton, by Rev. V. J. Hartshorne. . . 

Prescott, by W. F. Wendemuth 

Quincy, Wollaston, Anonymous Friend 

Randolph, by W. H. Leavitt 

Reed, Dwight, fund, Income 

Rutland, by Rev. Sidney Crawford 

Salem, Crombie St., by Frank A. 
Brown 

South Hadley, First, by L. M. Gaylord. 

Taunton, West, by L. P. Luther 

A Friend, by L. P. L 

Tolland, by Rev. S. B. Andrews 

Upton, First, by B. C. Wood 

Uxbridge, First Evan., by W. L. John- 
son 

Walpole, East, by Wm. Aldiich, for 
Alaskan work 

Waltham, Trinitarian, by Daniel 

French 

By T. W. Temple 



#10 


00 


25 


00 


s 


00 


2 


77 


s 


00 


10 


00 


"5 


00 


23 


00 


63 64 


70 


00 



267 56 



7 


00 


275 


00 


*7 
46 


34 
c8 


1.5 


00 


J 53 


00 



26 45 



137 


76 


152 


5° 


35 


5° 


gs 


85 


is 


5° 


7 


00 


s 


00 


20 


SO 


6 


60 


28 


56 


5 


00 


25 


00 


3° 


82 



* Received and entered on special account. 



I 36 



The Home Missionary 



October, 1899 



Warren, by Eugene F. Wood 

Webster, Blake, Rev. H. A 

Wellesley,by Geo T. Hall 

West Springfield, Park St., by Saml. 

Smith, to const. Rev. W. H. Webb, 

D.D., L. M.of C. H. M. S 

Weymouth, South, Union, by H. B. 

Reed 

Whitcomb, David, fund, Income 

Whitin, J. C, fund, Income 

Williamsburg, First, by Henry W. Hill 
Worcester, Piedmont, by A. W. Eldred 

Pilgrim 



83 72 Plymouth, by F. W. Chase 

5 00 Union, by T. H. Reed 

97 04 Woman's Home Missionary Association, 
by Miss Lizzie D. White. Treas.: 
Appropriation for Polish Bible 
S3 27 Reader, Ware, $30.00.* 

Worcester, Old South, 1st C. E. Soc, 
for Alaskan work, $10.00 



20 78 

I20 GO 
I20 OO 

53 3 6 
40 00 

5 00 



Home Missionary. 



JbO 24 

149 3 2 



.874 37 
2 25 



$3,876 62 



Received in August, 1899 



Bank balances, three months' int. on . . $106 51 
Barnstable, Centerville, by Mrs. O. 

Crosby 70 00 

Blackinton. by A. J. Pirotte 

Brockton, Porter, by Chas. P. Holland. 
Cambridge, First, by Geo. S. Saunders. 
Chicopee, First, by Rev. C. G. Burnham 
Cohasset, Beech wood , by Ella M . Bates . 

Coleraine, by Rev. CM. Crooks 

Dover, by J.' W. Higgins 

Everett, Mystic Side S. S., by E. S. 

Tracy 

Fall River, Fowler, by F. W. Lawson. 
Greenfield, First, by Rev. C. H. Wat- 
son 

Hadley, First S. S., by E. A. Randall . 
Hanover, Second, by Rev. John Wild, 

for rent of meeting-house in Havana. 

Hatfield, by F. H. Bardwell 

Hawley, by T. T.Clark 

Hinsdale, by M. M. Wentworth 

Holyoke, First, by J. H. Wylie,Jr 

Second, by J. N. Hubbard 

Ipswich, South, by Rev. T. Frank 

Waters 87 00 

Lawrence. Armenian residents, by Rev. 

W. E. Wolcott, for local Arm. work, 

$50.00.* 
Lowell, Armenian residents, by Rev. H. 
K. Santikian, for local Arm. work, 
$34.00.* 

John St. (addl.), by Rev. George H. 

Johnson 10 00 

Ludlow, First, by H. E. Miller 10 00 

Manchester, by Geo. F. Allen 5200 



40 


00 


292 


10 


21 


00 


5 


00 


8 


25 


11 


74 


6 


00 


28 


75 


IS 


00 


11 


00 


s 


00 


4Q 


«Q 


6 


J 7 


10 


00 


10 


45 


121 


32 



Methuen, First, by Jacob Emerson ... . 
New Hampshire, H. M. Soc, for Arme- 
nian service, $75.00.* 
Newton, Auburndale, by C. C. Burr, 

" for work in the West " 

North Brookfield, " Ever a friend of 

Missions '' 

Oxford, by Rev. A. E. Bradstreet, w. 

p. g., to const. Wesley Stone and Mrs. 

Katie J. Kilton L. Ms 

Peabody, West, by F. K. Mclntire 

Randolph, First (addl.), by W. H. 

Leavitt 

Reading, First, by Dean Peabody 

Reed, Dwight, fund, Income of 

Rockport, First, by Z. A. Appleton ($5 

of which gift of Z. A. A) 

Shrewsbury, by H. Harlow 

South Hadley Falls, by A. N. Chapin.. 
Taunton, Friends, by Emily A. Knapp. 
West Boylston, First, by E. B. Rice.... 
West Stockbridge, First, by Mrs. H. A. 
Roberts 

Village, by Chas. H. Fuarey 

Whitcomb, David, fund, Income of 

Worcester, Joslyn, Mrs. W. H., by Miss 
M. R.Goddard 

Park, by Miss L. A. Giddings 

Two Sisters, by Miss M. R. Goddard 
Wrentham, First, by S. M. Gerould 



as 


00 


10 


00 


si 


81 


8 


04 


1 


00 


15 


00 


48 


00 


15 


01 


ib 


00 


44 


98 


2 


00 


26 


50 


5 


00 


10 


oc 


12 


00 


10 


00 


J 4 


00 


2 


35 


19 


00 



Home Missionary. 



$1,331 31 
3° 

$1,331 61 



THE MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF CONNECTICUT 



Contributions for the month of June, 1S99. 

Hartford 



Ward W. Jacobs, Treastirer, 



Branford, by L. J. Nichols, for C. H. 

M. S 

Colchester, First, by Edward F. Strong. 

Durham, by Henry H. Newton 

Essex, Ivoryton, Swedish, by Rev. C. 

G. Younggren 

Franklin, by Rev. H. E. Hart 

Haddam, First, bv Rev. E. E. Lewis... 
Hartford, Park, by Willis E. Smith. . . . 

Wethersfield Ave., by Rev. S. B. 
Forbes 

Talcott Street, by A. I. Plato 

Killingly,Danielson,by Charles Phillips. 

ForC. H. M. S 

Lebanon, Exeter, by Charles C. Loomis. 
Manchester, Second, by Levi Drake 

ForC. H. M. S 

Meriden, First, by H. M. Billard 



vSi 


00 


J 7 


SS 


20 


00 


2 


20 


3 


00 


10 


00 


5i 


90 


18 


82 


5 


00 


3° 


98 


24 09 


25 


00 


81 


70 


81 


70 


165 


00 



New London, First, by P. LeRoy Har- 

wood $24 79 

Old Saybrook, by A. S. Chesebrough . . . 
Orange,West Haven, by Rev. S.J. Bryant. 
Saybrook, Deep River, Swedish, by Rev. 

C. G. Younggren 

Stafford, West Stafford, by Rev. J. A. 

Solandt 

Watertown, by George N. Griswold. 

Wethersfield, by S. F. Willard 

Winchester, by E. B. Bronson, for C. H. 

M.S 

Windsor, First, by S. H. Barber .. 
Windsor Locks, by C. A. Porter. . . 
W. C. H. M. U. of Conn., by Mrs. 

George Follett 



5 
44 


00 
36 


2 


70 


10 


00 


3° 
27 

22 


00 

15 

01 


42 
226 


5° 
go 


5° 


00 



* Received and reported on special account. 



October, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



137 



Contributions for the month of July, li 



Bridgeport, First, by R. E. Wheeler. . . $10 00 

King's Highway, by F. W. Storrs 2 93 

Y. P. S. C. E 4 co 

Bridgeport, Black Rock, by D. H. Stur- 

ges 7436 

Bristol, First, by L. G. Merick 25 00 

Canton, Collinsville, Pilgrim, Swedish, 

by L. P. Olson 12 50 

Colchester, Westchester, by E. E. Car- 
rier 2 30 

Cornwall, Second, by H. M. Pratt 40 70 

Essex, Second, by S. J. Tiley 30 n 

Glastonbury, First. A Friend 100 00 

Hartford, First, by C. T. Welles 178 07 

By C. T. Welles, for C. H. M. S 167 16 

Kent, by E. R. Eaton 5 54 

Middletown, Third, by J. J. Wilcox 11 69 

New Haven, Plymouth, by Samuel 

Lloyd 14 36 

Danish, by Ludwig Johnson 10 00 



Emanuel, by John Larson $12 00 

New London, Second, Estate J. N. Har- 
ris, balance of $10,000 legacy 416 48 

New Milford, First, by C. H. Noble 93 17 

Norfolk, by Stephen A. Selden 17 81 

Plymouth, by Arthur Beardsley 13 00 

Salem, by Rev. Calvin B. McLean 36 00 

Thomaston, First, bv H. A. Welton, for 

C. H. M. S 11 09 

Washington, Swedish, by Rev. L. G. 

Borg 5 00 

West Hartford, by Miss E. S. Elmer.. . 34 39 

$1,327 66 

Missionary Society of Conn 1,149 4 1 

Cong. Home Missionary Society 178 25 



$1,327 66 



Contributions for the month of August, 1899 



Chatham, Cobalt, by Rev. J. W. Moul- 
ton " $9 50 

Eastford, by Henry Trowbridge 12 80 

East Hartford, South, by Rev. F. P. 
Bacheler 10 00 

Fairfield, Greenfield, by Oliver H. 
Meeker 5584 

Glastonbury, South Glastonbury,Church 
and Sunday School, by H. D. Hale. . . 6 38 

Granby, First, by M. C. Hayes 15 00 

Greenwich, Mianus, by Rev. W. W. 
Davidson 3 00 

Hartford, Windsor Ave., by Henry H. 
Pease, for C. H. M. S 587 51 

Middletown, First, by E. P. Augur 25 00 

New Canaan, by H. B. Rogers 27 50 

New Haven, First, by Fred. T. Brad- 
ley 444 16 

Norwalk. East Norwalk, Swedish, by 
Rev. Gustaf Wiman 5 00 

Old Saybrook, by Robert Chapman .... 8 20 



By Robert Chapman, for C. H. M. S.. 

Ridgefield, Ridgebury, by Samuel A. 

Coe 

By Samuel A. Coe, for C. H. M. S. . . . 

Suffield, First, by W. E. Russell, to- 
gether with previous contributions to 
constitute Miss Hattie E. Adams a 
Life Member 

Thomaston, First, by H. A. Welton, for 
C. H. M. S 

Winchester, Winsted, Second, " A 
Friend " 

Windham, by William Swift 

Woodstock, First, by Henry T. Child. . 



Congregational Home Missionary Soc. . 
Missionary Society of Conn 



6 
6 


00 
00 


L 

31 


24 


9 


58 


95 
21 


25 

3i 
06 


$1,387 


52 


611 
776 


28 
24 



{1,387 52 



ILLINOIS HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

Receipts of the Illinois Home Missionary Society in April, May, June, July, 
Aaron B. Mead, Treasurer 



Abingdon $3110 

Annawan 3 66 

Avon (Y P. S. C. E., $4.00, Ladies' Aid 

Soc, $2.50) 17 00 

Beecher 8 00 

Big Rock, Mrs. Dr. Long. . , 3 00 

Bloomington 10 00 

Blue Island, Y. P. S. C. E 2 86 

Boaz 2 00 

Bunker Hill 34 15 

Chicago, First (S. S., $7.43 ; Y. P. S. C. 

E., $5.00) 5205 

Union Park 146 5^ 

Central Park (Y. P. S. C. E., $4 00) . . . 30 00 

Pilgrim 5 00 

Lake View, Ladies' Society 4 00 

Cragin, Y. P. S. C . E 1 23 

University, Rev. Henry Willard 25 00 

Forestville, Jun. Y. P. S. C. E 1 00 

Douglas Park, Y. P. S. C. E 3 00 

Mont Clare 1200 

Jefferson Park German 4 20 



Waveland Avenue , 

Sedgwick Street 

Cornwall 

Creal Springs 

Creston 

Danway 

De Kalb, First 

Swedish 

Earlville, J. A. D 

Elgin, Prospect Street 

Evanston, First 

Fairview 

Forrest 

Galesburg, Knox Street 

Geneva 

Glenview 

Gridley (Y. P. S. C. E., $5.00). 

Half Day 

Hamilton, Y. P. S. C. E 

Hennepin 

Highland 

Hillsboro 



4 


00 


2 


00 


5 

11 


3° 

86 


3 
16 


00 

78 


2 


20 


2 S 


00 


4 

61 


00 
19 


2 


5° 


7 

26 


44 
00 


5° 


00 


2 


00 


n 


5° 


1 
6 


5° 
00 


8 


00 


5 


16 


5 


10 



The Home Missionary 



October, 1899 



Hinsdale $18 74 

Kewanee, First 55 48 

Swedish ... 377 

Lockport -joi 

Marseilles 1 6 41 

Maywood, Y. P. S. C. E '500 

Mazon 6 37 

McLean 6 00 

Metropolis 4 00 

Milburn 1700 

Moline, Second, S. S 8 05 

Morgan Park 1 1 95 

Morton 273 

Naperville, First 46 50 

New Grand Chain 3 go 

Oak Park, First (special) 250 00 

Second 36 60 

Third 600 

Olmsted 1 60 

Pana 501 

Park Ridefe. German 2 12 

Paxton, Y P. S. C. E 12 57 

Payson (Y. P. S. C. E ., $10.00) 17 27 

Pecatonica, Y. P. S. C. E 3 00 

Plainfield, Mrs. A. E. Hagar 25 00 

Plymouth 5 74 

Poplar Grove 7 00 

Princeton 152 31 

Providence 5500 

Quincy, First Union 256 89 

Rockford, Second, S. S 20 00 

Rockton, Estate Dr. J.H. Carpenter... 5 00 

Rollo 14 70 

Seward (Winnebago Co.) 1800 

Shabbona 34 65 

Somonauk 410 

South Danville 2 50 

Stark, Y. P. S. C. E 13 00 

St. Charles. Mrs. M. Colton 5 00 

Summer Hill 3 50 

Tonica 220 

Vienna 8 28 

Waukegan. German, Ladies' Aid Soc. 5 co 

Wilmette 7 75 

Winnebago 3 co 

Woodburn (Y. P. S. C. E., $7.50) 15 00 

Woman's Home Missionary 

Union §65' 00 

A shkum 4 00 

Aurora, First ... 20 00 



Chandlerville $5 

Chicago, New England 12 

Union Park 52 

Lincoln Park 4 

Ravenswood 33 

South 1 

Pilgrim 21 

California Avenue.. 3 

University 4 

Douglas Park 1 

Covenant 9 

Auburn Park 12 

Danvers 2 

Decatur 5 

Dundee 8 

Elgin, First 15 

Elmhurst 17 

E vanston. First 51 

Homer, Jun Y. P. S. C. E 1 

Jacksonville 7 

Joy Prairie 1 5 

La Grange 1 

Moline, Second 3 

Oak Park, First 3 S 

Second n 

Paxton 1 S 

Payson 6 

Pittsfield 10 

Plymouth 3 

Rock Falls 5 

Rockford, First 14 

Second 10 

Rollo 8 

Springfield, Hope 4 

Spring Valley, First 20 

Stillman Valley 30 

Toulon 11 

Waverly... 10 

Wheaton, First 8 

Winnebago n 

Yorkville 4 

The Misses Wyckoff 3 



Friends 

Estate Mrs. Elizabeth C. Ingersoll. 

Quincy Association 

Rev. C. F. Van Auken 



602 


57 


15 


00 


100 


00 


7 


40 


25 


1 a 



$2,754 04 



MICHIGAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

Receipts of the Michigan Home Missionary Society in June, 1S99. Rev. John P. 

Sanderson, Treasurer 



Algansee 

Ann Arbor 

Cannon 

Maple City 

Merrill 

Mich. Center 

Red Jacket 

Sandstone ... 

Y. P. S.C. E 

Solon 

St. Joseph 

Vermontville 

West Adrian 

Williamston 

A Friend 

W. H. M. U., by Mrs. E. F. Grabill, 
Treas 



FOR THE DEBT 

Chelsea, Rev. J. S. Edmunds 



S<337 22 



Receipts of the W. H. M. U. of Michi- 
gan, for Home Missions, for June, 
1899, Mrs. E. F. Grabill. Treas. : 

Ann Arbor, W. H. M. S .$25 00 

Baroda, W. M. S 200 

Detroit. Fort St., W. M. S. 2 50 

Dorr, W. M. S 700 

Harrison, W. H. M. S 5 00 

Kalamazoo, W. H. M. U 39 19 

Lake Linden, W. H. M. U 1203 

Lake Odessa. W. H. M. S 8 00 

Muskegon, First, W. M. S 10 00 

Olivet, L. B. S 23 00 

Red Jacket, W. M. S 16 50 

Romeo. W. H. M. S 1600 

Sugar Island, Mrs. McKenney's quilt 2 60 
(The dimes gathered on it at annual 
meeting). 



YOUNG PEOPLE S FU^'D 



Detroit, First, Jun. C. E. Soc. 



S168 79 



F15 00 



$183 79 



October, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



139 



Receipts for Jtiiy., 1S99 



Alamo $5 70 

Baroda 100 

Bangor, First i 05 

West 55 

Bridgman 1 00 

Benzonia 1 00 

Chippewa Lake 150c 

Coloma 12 65 

Detroit, First 100 00 

Brewster 1 00 

East Paris 5 00 

Eaton Rapids 50 00 

Flat Rock i 00 

Hancock, S. S no 00 

Kalkaska 3 50 

Lewiston 5 00 

Maybee 1 69 

Nunica 1 00 

Perry 1 00 

Sugar Island 700 

Trout Creek 2 75 

Williamston 4 30 

Wolverine 10 00 

Ypsilanti. Y. P. S. C. E 10 00 

W. H. M. U., by Mrs. E. F. Grabill, 

Treas 292 03 



§643 22 



Receipts of the W. H. M. U. of Michi- 
gan, for Home Missions, for July, 
1899, Mrs. E. F. Grabill, Treas. : 

SENIORS 

Alamo, W. H. M. S $2 50 

Charlotte, L. B. S 25 00 

Cheboygan, W. H. M. U 600 

Chelsea, W. M. S 10 50 

Detroit, First, Woman's Association. 60 00 

Woodward Ave., Woman's Union.. 43 75 

Dexter, W. H. M. S 4 00 

Emmett, Mrs. John Allen 2 00 

Galesburg, W. H. M. & A. S 12 00 

Grand Rapids Park, W. H. M. S 27 05 

Greenville, W. H. M. S 170 

Interest on Notes 60 00 

Jackson, First, W. H. M. S 31 98 

Lawrence, W. H. M. U 5 56 

Litchfield, Miss C. A. Turrell , 15 co 

Mancelona, W. H. M. U 10 00 

Saginaw, W. A 75 00 

Victor, W. H. M. S 3 75 

Watervliet, W. H. & F. M. S 5 18 

"West Adrian, W. M. S 500 

$405 97 

YOUNG PEOPLES FUND 

Detroit, First. Junior C. E $3 00 

$406 97 



Receipts for August, li 



Ada, First , 

Second 

Bay Mills 

Custer 

Delhi Mission 

Imlay City 

Kendall 

Lake Odessa. . 

Olivet 

Pleasanton 

St. Clair 

Union City, Y. P. S. C. E 

Ionia Ch. Property 

W. H. M. U., by Mrs. E. F. Grabill, 

Treas.. 



52 95 
1 24 



1 95 
70 00 

3 4 6 

2 50 
21 86 
10 00 
10 50 
10 00 

9 00 

156 96 



Receipts of the W. H. M. U. of Michl 
gan, for Home Missions, for August 
1899, Mrs. E. F. Grabill, Treas. : 

SENIOR FUND 

Constantine, W. H. & F. M. S 

Grand Ledge, L. A. S. &W.K. M. U, 

Greenville, W. H. M. S. (in part) 

Otsego, W. M. S 

Stanton, W. H. M. S 

Travers City, W. H. M. S 

Vermontville, W. H. M. S 

Muskegon, First, Mission Band 



$3°3 36 



3 


00 


10 


76 


25 


00 


3 


15 


$54 


4 1 


2 


5° 



$56 91 



WOMAN'S STATE HOME MISSIONARY 
ORGANIZATIONS 

OFFICERS 



1. NEW HAMPSHIRE 
FEMALE CENT INSTITUTION 
Organized August, 1804 
and 
HOME MISSIONARY UNION 
Organized June, 1890 
President, Mrs. W. D. Knapp, Somersworth. 
Secretary, Mrs. M. W. Nims, 3 Liberty St., Con- 
cord. 
Treasurer, Miss Annie A. McFarland, 196 No. 
Main St., Concord. 



2. MINNESOTA 



WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 



Organized September, 1872 

President, Miss Catherine W. Nichols, 230 E. gth 

St.. St. Paul. 
Secretary, Mrs. E. R. Shepard, 2828 Chicago Ave., 

Minneapolis. 
Treasurer, Mrs. M. W. Skinner, Northfield. 



140 



The Home Missionary 



October, 1899 



3. ALABAMA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized March, 1877 

Reorganized April, 1889 

President, Mrs. G. W. Andrews, Talladega. 
Secretary, Mrs. J. S. Jackson, Montgomery. 
Treasurer, Mrs. E. C. Silsby, Talladega. 



8. OHIO 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 
Organized May, 1882 

President, Mrs C. W. Carroll, 48 Brookfield St., 

Cleveland. 
Secretary, Mrs. A H. Williams, 227 Princeton St., 

Cleveland. 
Treasurer, Mrs. George B. Brown, 2116 Warren 

St., Toledo. 



4. MASSACHUSETTS AND RHODE 
ISLAND* 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY ASSOCIA- 
TION 

Organized February, 1880 

President, Mrs. C. L. Goodell, 607 Congregational 

House, Boston. 
Secretary, Mrs. Louise A. Kellogg, 607 Congrega- President, Mrs. Wm. Kincaid, 483 Greene Ave. 

tional House, Boston. Brooklyn. 

Treasurer, Miss Lizzie D. White, 607 Congrega- Secretary, Mrs. Wm. Spalding, 513 Orange St. 
tional House, Boston. Syracuse. 

Treasurer, Mrs. J. J. Pearsall, 153 Decatur St. 
Brooklyn. 



9. NEW YORK 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 
Organized October, 1883 



5. MAINE 



WOMAN'S MISSIONARY AUXILIARY 
Organized June, 1880 

President, Mrs. Katherine B. Lewis, So. Berwick. 

Secretary, Mrs. Gertrude H. Denio, 168 Ham- 
mond St., Bangor. 

Treasurer, Mrs. Rose M. Crosby, 64 Grove St., 
Bangor. 



10. WISCONSIN 
WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1883 

President. Mrs. E. G. Updike, Madison. 
Secretary, Mrs. A. O. Wright, Madison. 
Treasurer, Mrs. L. E. Smith, Madison. 



6. MICHIGAN 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 
Organized May, 1881 

President, Mrs. I. P. Powell, 76 Jefferson Ave., 

Grand Rapids. 
Secretary, Mrs. E. N. Thorne, 212 So. Union St., 

Grand Rapids. 
Treasurer, Mrs. E. F. Grabill, Greenville. 



11. NORTH DAKOTA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized November, 1883 

President, Mrs. J L. Maile, Fargo. 
Secretary, Mrs. Silas Daggett, Harwood. 
Treasurer, Mrs. J. M. Fisher, Fargo. 



7. KANSAS 



12. OREGON 



WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 
Organized October, 1881 

President, Mrs. R. B. Guild, 1336 Dillon St. 

Topeka. 
Secretary, Mrs. M. H. Jaquith, 1157 Filmore St. 

Topeka. 
Treasurer, Miss May Wilkinson, Ottawa. 



WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized July, 1884 

President, Mrs. F. Eggert. The Hill, Portland. 
Cor. Sec, Mrs. D. D. Clarke, 447 E. 12th St., No. 

Portland. 
Treasurer, Mrs. C. F. Clapp, Forest Grove. 



* While the W. H. M. A. appears in the above list as a State body for Massachusetts and Rhode 
Island, it has certain auxiliaries elsewhere. 



October, i! 



The Home Missionary 



141 



13. WASHINGTON 

Including Northern Idaho 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized July, 1884 

Reorganized June, 1889 

President, Mrs. A. Judson Bailey, 805 First Ave. 

West, Seattle. 
Secretary, Mrs. W. C. Wheeler, 424 South K St. 

Tacoma. 
Treasurer, Mrs. E. B. Burwell, 323 Seventh Ave. 

Seattle. 

14. SOUTH DAKOTA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized September, 1884 

President, Mrs. C. E. Corry, Columbia. 
Secretary, Mrs. K. M. Jenney, Huron. 
Treasurer, Mrs. F. M. Wilcox, Huron. 



15. CONNECTICUT 
WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized January, 1885 

President, Miss Ellen R. Camp, 9 Camp St., New 

Britain. 
Secretary, Mrs. C. T. Millard, 36 Lewis St., 

Hartford. 
Treasurer, Mrs. W. W. Jacobs, 530 Farmington 

Ave., Hartford. 



16. MISSOURI 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1885 

President, Mrs. Henry Hopkins, 916 Holmes St., 

Kansas City. 
Secretary, Mrs. L. F. Doane, 3319 East Ninth St., 

Kansas City. 
Treasurer, Mrs. K. L. Mills, 1526 Wabash Ave., 

Kansas City. 



17. ILLINOIS 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1885 

President, Mrs. Sidney Strong, 234 N. Elmwood 

Ave., Oak Park. 
Secretary, Mrs. A. O. Whitcomb, 463 Irving 

Ave., Chicago. 
Treasurer, Mrs. Mary S. Booth, Chicago. 



18. IOWA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized June, 1886 

President, ■ 

Secretary, Mrs. H. H. Robbins, Grinnell. 
Treasurer, Miss Belle L. Bentley, W. Grand Ave., 
Des Moines. 



19. CALIFORNIA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

Organized June, 1887 

President, Mrs. E. S. Williams, Saratoga. 

Secretary, Mrs. F. B. Perkins, 546 24th St., Oak- 
land. 

Treasurer, Mrs. J. M. Haven, 1329 Harrison St., 
Oakland. 



20. NEBRASKA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized November, 1887 

President, Mrs. D. B. Perry, Crete. 
Secretary, Mrs. H. Bross. 2904 Q Street, Lincoln. 
Treasurer, Mrs. Charlotte C. Hall, 1318 C St., 
Lincoln. 



21. FLORIDA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized February, 1888 

President, Mrs. S. F. Gale, Jacksonville. 
Secretary, Mrs. W. H. Edmondson, Daytona. 
Treasurer, Mrs. W. D. Brown, Interlachen. 



22. INDIANA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1888 

President, Mrs. W. A. Bell, 121 1 Broadway, In- 
dianapolis. 
Secretary, Mrs. J. E. Hall, Alexandria. 
Treasurer, Mrs. Anna D. Davis, 1608 Bellefon- 
taine St., Indianapolis. 

23. SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 
WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 
Organized May, 1888 

President, Mrs. Warren F. Day, 949 So. Hill St., 

Los Angeles. 
Secretary, Mrs. Kate G. Robertson, Mentotie. 
Treasurer, Mrs. Mary M. Smith, Public Library, 

Riverside. 



24. VERMONT 
WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized June, 1888 

President, Mrs. Rebecca P. Fairbanks, St. Johns- 
bury. 

Secretary, Mrs. C. L. Smith, 159 Pine St., Bur- 
lington. 

Treasurer, Mrs. Robert MacKinnon, St. Johns- 
bury. 



142 



The Home Missionary 



October, i< 



25. COLORADO 
WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1888 

Hon. Pres., Mrs. J. W. Pickett, Whitewater. 

President, Mrs. E. R. Drake, 18 Mack Block. 
Denver. 

Secretary, Mrs. Addison Blanchard, 3023 Down- 
ing Ave., Denver. 

Treasurer, Mrs. B. C. Valentine, Highlands. 

26. WYOMING 
WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1888 

Reorganized December, 1892 

President, Mrs. J. A. Raner. Cheyenne. 
Secretary, Mrs. W. L. Whipple. Cheyenne. 
Treasurer, Mrs. A. E. Kevan, Rock Springs. 

27. GEORGIA 
WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized November. 1888 

New Organization October, 1898 

President, Miss M. L. Graham, Savannah. 
Secretary, Miss Jennie Curtis, Mcintosh. 
Treasurer. Miss Mattie Turner, Athens. 

28. MISSISSIPPI 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized April, 1889 

President, Mrs. C. L. Harris, 1421 31st Ave., Me- 
ridian. 

Secretary. 

Treasurer, Mrs. L. H. Turner, 3112 12th St., Me- 
ridian. 



31. NORTH CAROLINA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1889 

President, Mrs. O. Faduma, Troy. 
Seer eta ry j 

and VMiss A. E. Farrington. 108 Newbury 
Treasurer, \ St., Portland, Maine. 



32. TEXAS 
WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized March, 1890 

President, Mrs. Eunice Heflin, Sherman. 
Secretary. Mrs. Donald Hinkley, Dallas. 
Treasurer, Mrs. A. Geen, Dallas. 



33. MONTANA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1890 

President, Mrs. V. F. Clark, Livingston. 
Secretary. Mrs. H. J. Miller, Livingston. 
Treasurer, Mrs. W. S. Bell, 410 Dearborn Ave. 
Helena. 



34. PENNSYLVANIA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized June, 1890 

President, Mrs. C. F. Yennie, Ridgway. 
Secretary, Mrs. C. F. Chamberlain, Cambridge- 

boro. 
Treasurer, Mrs. W. H. Clift, 386 Walnut St., 

Meadville. 



29. LOUISIANA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized April, 1889 

President, Mrs. L. St. J. Hitchcock, 2436 Canal St., 

New Orleans. 
Secretary, Mrs. Matilda Cabrere. 2419 Conti St., 

New Orleans. 
Treasurer, Miss Mary L. Rogers, 2436 Canal St., 

New Orleans. 



30. ARKANSAS, KENTUCKY, AND TEN- 
NESSEE 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION OF THE 
CENTRAL SOUTH ASSOCIATION 

Organized April, 1889 

President, Mrs. Ella S. Moore. Box 8, Fisk Uni 
versity, Nashville. Tenn. 

Secretary. Miss Mary L. Corpier, Florence. Ala. 

Treasurer, Mrs. Preston Burrus, 815 Cedar St., 
Nashville. 



35. OKLAHOMA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1890 

President, Mrs. J. H.Parker, Kingfisher. 
Secretary. Mrs. Joel Harper, Oklahoma City. 
Treasurer, Mrs. A. B. Hammer, Oklahoma City. 



36. NEW JERSEY 

Including District of Columbia, Maryland, 
and Virginia 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION OF 
THE NEW JERSEY ASSOCIATION 

Organized March, 1891 

President. Mrs. Isaac Clark, cor. Fourth and Col- 
lege Sts.. N. W, Washington. D. C. 

Secretary. Miss Julia M. Pond. 607 T St., N. E., 
Washington, D. C. 

Treasurer, Mrs. J. H. Denison, 150 Belleville Ave., 
Newark. 



October, 1899 



The Home Missionary 



143 



37. UTAH 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1891 

Reorganized December, 1892 

President, Mrs. Hemphill, 67 J St., Salt Lake City. 
Secretary, Mrs. L. E. Hall, 78 East First North 

Street, Salt Lake City. 
Treasurer, Miss Anna Baker, 654 East Third South 

Street, Salt Lake City. 



38. INDIAN TERRITORY 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized April, 1892 

President, 

Secretary, Miss Louise Graper. Vinita. 
Treasurer, Mrs. Raymond, Vinita. 



40. NEW MEXICO 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized November, 1892 

President, Mrs. E. H. Ashmun, Albuquerque. 
Secretary, Mrs. F. A. Burlingame, Albuquerque. 
Treasurer, Mrs. M. McClaskey, Albuquerque. 



41. BLACK HILLS, SO. DAKOTA 

BLACK HILLS WOMAN'S MISSIONARY 

UNION 

Organized October, 1893 

President, Mrs. J. B. Gossage, Rapid City. 
Secretary, Mrs. C. W. Barron, Rapid City. 
Treasurer, Mrs. E. L. Billings, Lead. 



39. NEVADA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1892 

President, Mrs. L. J. Flint, Reno. 
Secretary, Miss Margaret N. Magill, Reno. 
Treasurer, Miss Mary Clow, Reno. 



42. IDAHO 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1895 

President, Mrs. R. B. Wright, Boise. 
Secretary, Mrs. C. E. Mason, Mountainhome. 
Treasurer, Mrs. L. H Johnston, Challis. 



144 The Home Missionary October, ii 



SECRETARIES OF YOUNG PEOPLE'S WORK 



{ Young Ladies' Work, Mrs. B. W. Smith, 600 West Thirty- 

MlNNESOTA. 



second St., Minneapolis. 



Christian Endeavor Work, Miss Bertha Hanneman, 521 Ninth 

St., Minneapolis. 

Mass. and R. I. Miss Bertha M. Shepard, 607 Congregational House, Boston. 

Michigan Mrs. W. J. Gregory, 459 Third St., Manistee. 

Kansas Miss Harriet Broad, Topeka. 

Ohio Miss M. C. Smith, 840 Doan St., Cleveland. 

New York Mrs. Geo. R. Haines, 978 Delaware Ave., Buffalo. 

North Dakota Mrs. E. S. Shaw, Cooperstown. 

Oregon. Mrs. W. D. Palmer, 443 West Park St., Portland. 

Washington Mrs. W. C. Davie, 423 North N St., Tacoma. 

South Dakota Mrs. Grace Burleigh, Mitchell. 

Illinois Mrs. J. T. Blanchard, 232 Walnut St., Aurora. 

Missouri Miss H. E. Price, 713 West 28th St., Kansas City. 

Iowa Miss Fannie Spencer, Alden. 

California Miss Caroline A. Potter, 600 Seventeenth St., Oakland. 

Nebraska Mrs. J. N. Hyder, 1520 U St., Lincoln. 

Southern California. ..Miss Phebe Mayhew, 4 Barnard Park, Los Angeles. 

Vermont Mrs. G. W. Patterson, East St. Johnsbury. 

Colorado Mrs. A. D. Blakeslee, 145 South Lincoln St., Denver. 

Montana Mrs. E. E. Esslestyn, Red Lodge. 

SECRETARIES OF CHILDREN'S WORK 

Minnesota Miss Carrie S. Pond, 608 Canada St., St. Paul. 

Michigan Mrs. Geo. Wilson, Detroit. 

Kansas .Miss Hattie Booth, Newton. 

Ohio Mrs. Effie Morgan, 380 St. Clair St., Cleveland. 

North Dakota Mrs. O. J. Wakefield, Wahpeton. 

South Dakota. ... Mrs. I. Crain, Waubay. 

Illinois Mrs. J. A. Thome, 1006 Garfield Blvd., Chicago. 

Nebraska Mrs. H. D. Neely, 4371 Hamilton St., Omaha. 

Southern California. ..Miss Emily M. Peck, 920 W. Eighth St., Los Angeles. 
Montana Rev. Alice S. Barnes, Castle. 



Congregational Home Missionary Society 

Field Secretaries , 

Rev. W. G. Puddefoot, South Framingham, Mass. 
Rev. C. W. Shelton, Norwalk, Conn. 

Superintendents 

Rev. Moritz E. Eversz, D.D., German Department, 153 La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 

Rev. S. V. S. Fisher, Scandinavian Department, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Rev. Henry A. Schauffler, D.D., Slavic Department, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Rev. Edw. D. Curtis, D.D Indianapolis, Ind. Rev. G. J. Powell Fargo, N. Dak. 

Rev. S. F. Gale Jacksonville, Fla. Rev. H. Sanderson Denver, Col. 

Rev. Alfred K. Wrav, D.D Kansas City, Mo. Rev. C. T. Brown Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Rev. L. P. Broad Topeka, Kan. Rev. J. K. Harrison San Francisco, Cal. 

Rev. F. H. Allen Albuquerque, N. M. Rev. John L. Maile Los Angeles, Cal. 

Rev. A. Judson Bailey Seattle, Wash. Rev. C. F. Clapp Forest Grove, Ore. 

Rev. Homer W. Carter, D.D Beloit, Wis. -,-, T w TnvP „ t-> 71 J 511 Woodland Terrace, 



Rev. A. A. Brown. 



i tj, , tj.,, j it; ■ Kev. l.W. ONES, D.D... - J n , ■, , , ,. T, 

# J Black Hills and Wyoming. J ' I Philadelphia, Pa. 

• / Hot Springs, South Dakota. Rev. W. S. Bell Helena, Mon. 

Rev. Harmon Bross, D.D Lincoln, Neb. Rev, J. Homer Pakkek Kingfisher, Okl. 

Rev. S. F. Gale (Act'g Supt. Ala.), Jacksonville, Fla. Rev. A. G. Upton Weiser, Idaho 

Rev. Frank E. Jenkins Atlanta, Ga. Rev. E. H. Ashmun Jerome, Ariz. 

Rev. W. H. Thrali H uron, S. Dak. 

Secretaries and Treasurers 

of the Auxiliaries 

Rev. David P. Hatch, Secretary Maine Missionary Society ... First Nat. Bk. Bldg., Portland, Me. 

W. P. Hubbard, Esq., Treasurer " " ....Box 1052, Bangor, Me. 

Rev. A. T. Hillman, Secretary , New Hampshire Home Miss. Society Concord, N. H. 

Hon. Lyman D. Stevens, Treasurer " " " " " Concord, N. H. 

Rev. Charles H. Merrill, Secretary Vermont Domestic " " . . . .St. Johnsbury, Vt. 

Wm. C. Tyler, Treasurer " " .in St. Johnsbury, Vt. 

Rev. Joshua Coit, Secretary Massachusetts Home " " .... | 609 Cong'l House, 

Rev. Edwin B. Palmer, Treasurer " '•■ ( Boston, Mass. 

Rev. J. H. Lyon, Secretary Rhode Island " ".' " ... .Central Falls, R. I. 

Jos. Wm. Rice, Esq., Treasurer " " " ... .Providence, R. I. 

Dea. David N. Camp, Secretary Missionary Society of Connecticut Hartford, Conn. 

Ward W. Jacobs, Esq., Treasurer " " Hartford, Conn. 

Rev. Ethan Curtis, Secretary New York Home Miss. Society Syracuse, N. Y. 

William Spalding, Treasurer.... ' " " " " Syracuse, N. Y. 

Rev. J. G. Fraser, D.D., Secretary Ohio " " " Cleveland, Ohio. 

Rev. J. G. Fraser, D.D., Treasurer " " . " " Cleveland, Ohio. 

Rev. James Tompkins, D.D., Secretary Illinois ) 153 La Salle St., 

Aaron B. Mead, Esq., Treasurer " " ( Chicago, 111. 

Rev. Homer W. Carter, D.D., Secretary. . . .Wisconsin " Beloit, Wis. 

C. M. Blackman, Esq., Treasurer '.' " Whitewater, Wis. 

Rev. T. O. Douglass, D.D., Secretary Iowa Grinnell, Iowa. 

J. H. Merrill, Esq., Treasurer " Des Moines, Iowa. 

Rev. William H. Warren, D.D., Secretary. .Michigan Home Miss. Society Lansing, Mich. 

Rev. John P. Sanderson, Treasurer " Lansing, Mich. 

Geo. H. Morgan, Secretary Cong. City Miss. Society St. Louis, Mo. 

Rev. A. K. Wray, D.D. , Superintendent " " " " Kansas City, Mo. 

Lewis E. Snow, Treasurer " " St. Louis, Mo. 

Communications 

relating to general business of the Society may be addressed to either of the Secretaries for Correspondence. 
Communications relating to the Editorial Department of The Home Missionary or of. the Home Missionary 
section of Congregational Work, may be addressed to Rev. J. B. Clark, D.D. Correspondence of the 
Woman's Department may be addressed to Mrs. H. S. Caswell, Congregational Rooms, New York. 

Donations and Subscriptions 

in Drafts, Checks, Registered Letters, or Post-Office Orders may be addressed to Wm. B. Howland, 
Treasurer, Fourth Avenue and 22d Street, New York. 

A PAYMENT OF $50 CONSTITUTES A LIFE MEMBER 



Form of a Bequest 



I bequeath to my executors the sum of dollars, in trust, to pay over the same, 

in months after my decease, to the person who, wjien the same is payable, shall act as Treasurer 

of the Congregational Home Missionary Society, formed in the City of New York, in the year eighteen hundred 
and twenty-six, to be applied to the charitable use and purposes of said Society, and under its direction. 



Congregational Home Missionary Society 
Fourth Ave. and 2 2d St., New York 



Major-General Oliver 0. Howard 

President 

Secretaries for Correspondence 

Rev. Joseph B. Clark, D.D. e ?b n. 

I l3l 9 a * 8 t> S 0c 
Rev. Wa hut Jhoate, D.D. 

Mr. WILLIAM B. Howland, Treasurer 



Executive Committee 

Wm, Ives Washburn, Esq., CJiairmcui 

Asa A. Spear, Esq., Recording Secretary 

Mr. Joseph Wm. Rice 

Rev. Charles H. Richards, D.D. 

Mr. George P. Stockwell 

Rev. John D. Kingsbury, D.D. 

Mr. George W. Hebard 

John H. Perry, Esq. 

Mr. John F. Anderson, Jr. 

Mr. Wm. H. Wanamaker 

Mr. Edwin H. Baker 

Rev. Edw. P. Ingersoll, D.D. 

Rev. John De Peu 

Press of J.J. Little & Co., Astor Place, New York 



FOREFINSER OF AMERICA 



THE MISSIONARY SITUATION 



The 



Home Missionary 

January, 1900 




SPONGE WHARF, KEY WEST, FLORIDA 

Vol. LXXIL No. 3 

New York 

Congregational Home Missionary Society 

Congregational Rooms, Fourth Ave. and 22d St. 

Entered at the Post-Office at New York, N. Y., as Second-Class £Maii| Matter 

'*** IN 5 DAYS TO' 
J3I9 Walnut S* 



^C Pi 






Contents for January, 1900 



PAGE 

Editorial Notes I4 c 

The Forefinger of America 150 

The Missionary Situation 156 

The Situation Stated, by Sec. 

George M. Boynton, D.D. 
Opportunity, the Mark of the 

" Situation," by Sec. CO. Day. 
What is the Matter with the 

Situation, by Sec. J. B. Clark. 
The Motive, by Sec. James L. 

Barton, D.D. 



The Massachusetts Centennial ; Ex- 
tract from Dr. E. B. Webb's 
Address at Hartford 1 

Western Prosperity (Continued). . . 

In Colorado, by Supt. Sanderson. 

In Northern California, by Supt. 

Harrison. 

In Oregon, by Supt. Clapp. 

In Washington, by Supt. Bailey. 

" Our Spanish Neighbor " 1 



The Home Missionary 



Is published quarterly, at thirty cents a year, postage paid. It is sent without charge, 
request, to be made annually, to Life Members ; Missionaries of the Society and its Aux 
iliaries ; Ministers securing a yearly collection for it in their congregations ; also to individ 
als, associations, or congregations, one copy for a year for every ten dollars collected and pai 
over to the Society or an Auxiliary. Suitable names should accompany the paymen 
Pastors are earnestly requested to serve Home Missions by promoting the use of this journ; 
and "Congregational Work" at the Monthly Concert and among their people. 

Immediate notice of discontinuance or change of post-office address should be given 



The Home Missionary 



Vol. LXXII JANUARY, 1900 No. 3 



EDITORIAL NOTES 

Eight months of the fiscal year have now been recorded. As com- 
pared with the corresponding months of the previous year they show a 
gain in contributions from the living of $20,^2.9^, and 

The Treasury. & . . , . , . ^ °° ■ ' 

a gain in legacies of $26,795 5- total gain, $47,327.93. The 
remaining months of the year are usually the best in the history of the 
treasury. We appeal, therefore, with not a little hope, to the friends of 
Home Missions to maintain the lead here reported, and by one united 
effort to throw off the heavy debt of the Society between this date and 
April 1, 1900. 

We apply the term to those who stand ready, in the service of the 

Society, to respond to the calls of the churches in presenting the cause 

of Home Missions and soliciting contributions to the 

The Field Force, treasury. 

Rev. W. G. Puddefoot, whose address is South 
Framingham, Mass., is in constant demand in and out of New England, 
and his appointments are made months in advance. 

Rev. C. W. Shelton, who has returned from the Mediterranean with 
reestablished health, has many calls, and is now in sufficient strength to 
accept all that may come. He is to be addressed at this office. 

Miss M. Dean Moffatt, in addition to many demands from Eastern 
churches, has lately returned from a missionary trip in Minnesota, where 
she addressed many assemblies and kindled a new missionary interest 
wherever she spoke. Her address for appointments is the national office. 

Mrs. H. S. Caswell, Secretary of the Woman's Department, has, during 
the past year, journeyed far and wide both East and West, and has stirred 
many hearts, not only among women, but among men, by her missionary 
addresses. She has traveled about 25,000 miles and given 205 missionary 
talks in sixteen different States all the way from Rhode Island and Ver- 
mont to Washington and Oregon. It is not easy to estimate the effect of 
all these agencies upon the treasury ; but it is safe to say they bring in 



146 The Home Missionary January, 1900 

many thousand dollars above the expense of maintaining them, while their 
educational value is beyond computation. 

The Boston Congregational Club generously devoted its October 
meeting to a discussion of this question, assigning that duty to four mis- 
sionary secretaries. No division of the subject was made 
Situation 30, and no understanding was had between the speakers. 
But as it turned out the addresses dealt, first, with The 
Situation as it is ; secondly, The Opportunity ; thirdly, What is the mat- 
ter with the Situation ? and fourthly, The Motive. By the courtesy of 
three of the speakers, we are able to present the discussion to our readers. 
It is not complete, but it may serve as the "warning note " which Presi- 
dent Angel advised, in his opening address at the International Council, 
should be struck. 

Dr. E. B. Webb's address at Hartford, in connection with the Massa- 
chusetts Centennial, was a comprehensive review of what Christianity has 

accomplished for America in the past hundred years. 
Centennial" 8 We wish il: were possible to present the address in full, 

but the limitations of our space forbid. The extract 
selected, and to be found on another page, is the graphic rehearsal of a 
familiar story which cannot be too often retold — the story of the heroic 
discovery and recovery of the great Northwest. That magnificent terri- 
tory saved to America by the brave Whitman, Spaulding, and their equally 
brave successors, is to be completely redeemed by the power of the Gospel 
under the Home Missionary Society. 

The New York Indefiefident of recent date has the following item : 
" About a year ago the Congregational Home Missionary Society and the 

Congregational Sunday-school and Publishing Society 
Comity? united in sending Rev. Loyal L. Wirt to Alaska to begin 

work in new towns that were rapidly opening there. He 
interested the people in Douglas and other points very deeply, so that 
they were disposed to contribute generously to secure a good house of 
worship in Douglas for regular Congregational service. The Congrega- 
tional Church Building Society rendered generous aid ; thus three Soci- 
eties gave their liberal support to this man's work. One year has passed 
and a little more, and there are now four church organizations in that 
little town of Douglas — a Catholic, Episcopal, and Methodist, the Congre- 
gationalists being without question the first on the ground and making 
provision for all the Protestant work needed. The churches cry out vig- 
orously against over-churching new towns. Their cry seems to be heard 
mainly in the offices of the Societies doing the work. How would it do for 



January, 1900 The Home Missionary 147 

them to turn their cries into the ears of those who violate comity by enter- 
ing such fields after they are fairly and generously taken possession of? " 
Commenting upon the above, the Pacific says : " If there is any good 
reason for these four churches in Douglas the Pacific would be pleased 
to know it. The pure gospel is preached in the Congregational church 

[at Douglas, and it was preached there from the very day our work was 
begun." 

Such abuses are too common ; but the remedy is hard to find. Between 

i the Congregational, the Presbyterian, and the Reformed Home Mission 
Boards there is a compact which works well both in preventing and in cor- 
recting this abuse ; but other Home Boards have declined to enter into the 
agreement. Mr. Wirt anticipated planting a church in Juneau, Alaska, 
where there seemed to be an earnest demand and an ample field; but upon 

I protest of a sister denomination, established on the ground, he was 
instructed to withdraw and did so. The Home Missionary Society stands 
pledged to its constituency "never to plant a Congregational church upon 
ground fairly occupied by any other evangelical body." 

Such is the motto, slightly condensed, of the Nebraska News, which 
has passed its twentieth year with an issue of nearly two thousand copies. 
In illustration of this motto, it says in a recent issue : 
''F"h°f eaC Ji " "Nebraska Congregationalists are personally inter- 

ested in each of the seven Societies ; each Society has 
beneficiaries on our own soil. There is no better reason for gathering an 
offering for one in any church than for all seven." 

This sentiment is in exact accord with the policy of the Home Mis- 
sionary Society, which, in every commission it issues, commends each 
, Society by name to every missionary church and pastor for an annual 
contribution. 

The November 2d number of the Pacific is largely given to a re- 
port of the semi-centennial of Congregationalism in that State. It is a 
wonderful story, almost a fairy tale. Men are living and 
California Jubilee, were present at the meeting of the State Association, 
where the occasion was celebrated, who witnessed the 
feeble beginnings of 1849, have seen the whole glorious progress, and are 
themselves a part of it all. 

The statistical review of Mr. H. E. Jewett is specially valuable and 
stimulating. Tracing the growth from decade to decade, he finds at the end 
of fifty years over 18,000 communicants gathered in 208 Congregational 
churches, which have contributed to the various benevolences of the de- 
1 nomination a round million dollars. When Dr. Milton Badger stood up in 
Broadway Tabernacle to charge the youthful James H. Warren, one of 



148 The Home Missionary January, 19a] 

the earliest Home Missionaries to the Coast, not he, with all his Christian 
optimism, caught a vision of any such results, and not the most hopefu 
friend of Home Missions in the East ever dreamed at that time of th< 
story then beginning to unfold. One item essential to the completeness 
of such a review, but strangely omitted, is the fact that $595,000 havu 
been contributed by the Congregational churches of the country through 
the treasury of the Congregational Home Missionary Society toward this 
grand result. 

It may be added that the State Association voted to cooperate wi 
other States in the Plan of the Committee of Fifteen, and expressed itse 
in favor of the federation of our benevolent societies. Self-support fo 
the State was favored in 1901. 

In connection with the leading article of this number the following 
note from its author, Rev. C. W. Frazer, will be of interest : 

" What am I to do ? 1 baptized fifty-nine infanti 
'' Bab ^ =,e ^f last year. We want to begin 1900 with our seven-year 
old babies and give each one a substantial Bible and to 
hold a special service for them. Nineteen come in for it now, with an 
ever ascending scale till we reach fifty-nine and maybe more. Do you 
know of a rich (poor) baby-less church that would take our Bible expense ? 
We will ask them to share the inscription on or in the Bibles given, so 
teaching our young that there are other churches to which they owe some- 
thing." 

The above offer, we presume, will apply to any rich (poor) man as well 
as to a church. 



, 



The hope a.id prophecy indulged in three months ago respecti 

Wisconsin have been gloriously fulfilled. At the October meeting of the 

State Society it was overwhelmingly voted that after 

Wisconsin Self- October 1st, Wisconsin should be no more two mission- 
supporting. 

ary districts, but one self-supporting State. It took 

courage and will require self-sacrifice ; but it was the right thing to do, 

and the churches will be blessed in doing it. 

Before this issue reaches most of our readers, the Executive Committee 
will have devoted many thoughtful hours to the apportionment of the new 

year beginning April 1, 1900. No duty of the whole 
The Apportionment, year is to them more difficult or requiring more thought 

and protracted deliberation. At Hartford, last May, the 
Committee expressed their conviction that contributions from the mission- 
ary field should show an increase of at least 100 per cent. Why not? 
When the financial panic struck the churches East and West, the West 



January, 1900 The Home Missionary 149 

was giving about $80,000. Last year it gave about $40,000. But times 
have changed. The concurrent testimony of superintendents published 
in the October magazine, and continued in the current number, establishes 
the fact of the phenomenal prosperity of Western States ; it also shows 
that Congregational churches are sharing fairly in the improved condi- 
tions. Why should the home missionary treasury not reap the benefit of 
I; better times? An advance of 100 per cent, from the field would doubt- 
less be followed by a generous response from the East, which is always 
prompt to help those who are willing to help themselves. 

It is a matter for regret that Rev. A. G. Upton, Superintendent of 

Idaho, has been compelled by continued ill-health to resign. His service 

has been a brief one, in which he has won the affectionate 

Chai Rew nthe re S ard of pastors and churches. Rev. R. B. Wright, of 

Boise, succeeds him as pastor-superintendent. Mr. Wright 

has served the Society for many years, is well acquainted with conditions 

in Idaho, and was the unanimous choice of the churches. 

Rev. A. A. Brown, Superintendent of Wyoming and the Black Hills, 
after seven and one-half years of faithful service, has retired in favor of a 
new and necessary division of his field. The Black Hills churches are 
added to the charge of Superintendent Thrall, of South Dakota, and the 
churches of Wyoming will be cared for by a joint-superintendent of the 
Home Missionary Society and the Sunday-school and Publishing Society. 
Rev. W. B. D. Gray has accepted the appointment. 

Rev. J. H. Morley, after eleven years of devoted service, retires from 
the superintendency of Minnesota, and Rev. Dr. G. R. Merrill, of Chicago, 
for many years pastor of the First Church in Minneapolis, succeeds him 
with the hearty approval of the State. 

Rev. E. P. Herrick, who was recently appointed superintendent of 
Cuban work, has removed, with his family, to Havana, and under his 
direction the missionary work on the island will be immediately developed. 
Several points are waiting to be occupied outside of the city ; congrega- 
tions have been gathered and are waiting only for their spiritual leaders. 
Rev. J. M. Lopez, pastor of our Cuban church in New York and Brook- 
lyn, will spend some three months in Havana assisting in the organization 
of the church at that important center. He will sail from New York 
about January 1st. 

It was proposed in the October number to open a Roll of Honor that 

should include the names of churches coming to self-support, whether in 

the national or in the auxiliary field during the fiscal year 

Roll of Honor. .■■»,•, t, « /f, IN 5 fUVQ m'*' 

ending March 31, 1900. full responses, have not 'been i 
received, but the following are to be noted : German Department : 



i5o 



The Home Missionary 



January, 1900! 



Fresno, Cal.; Illinois: Winnebago, Kirkland ; Indiana: Dunkirk; Iowa:| 
Bacon, Cartina, Hiteman, Milford, Shell Rock; Kansas: Anthony, Par- 
sons, Little River; Nebraska : Curtis, Freewater, Hildreth, Silver Creek, 
Wisner, Wilcox ; New Mexico, Albuquerque ; Northern California 
Murphys, North Berkeley, Green Valley ; Oklahoma : Kingfisher ; 
Oregon : Huntington ; South Dakota : Frankfort and Turton ; Ver- 
mont : North Hyde Park and Eden ; Wisconsin : Wyocena, Tomah, 
Lone Rock, and Bear Valley ; Maine : Union and Andover. 



THE FOREFINGER OF AMERICA 

By Rev. Charles W. Frazer, Key West, Fla. 

The map of the United States has been likened to many things ani- 
mate and inanimate. For the last seven years it has seemed to the writer 
the shadow of a right hand with index finger ever pointing toward the 
south, and almost touching Cuba. It is about the tip end of this index 
that I am to write. Few people know that nearly 25,000 people live in 
Key West. Roughly speaking, one-third are white Bahamians and their 
descendants; one-third negroes, also from the Bahamas; the Cubans sup- 




PASTOR FRAZER IN HIS STUDY, KEY WEST, FLORIDA 



January, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



151 



ply the rest. To understand Key West at all, one's point of view is 
therefore Cuba and the Bahama Islands. Seven years' residence there has 
made me, seemingly, more a resident of some foreign country than of the 
United States. "All the day long" has this hand been pointing south- 
ward, till its index finger has become, in at least three of its cities, 
festering sores. " Go or suffer ! " says that hand. We suffered before we 
went. The cry of " Go West, young man ! " has been hushed in the later 
cry of Southern Islands, already populated. 




CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, KEY WEST, FLORIDA 



Key West comes into this problem, because it was the home of 
the revolution for many years. Ten thousand Cubans there plotted 
and planned how they might free Cuba. Literally, millions of money 
poured into the treasury for Cuba Libre from the whole population, and 
no pen will ever be able to fully portray how thousands of Cubans beg- 
gared themselves by their gifts. But little has been done for the Cubans 
there in all these years. One Methodist Church is about all there is to 
show ; one Catholic priest confessed it was no use to try. The efforts of 
others are worthy of little mention. Why this neglect of Cubans in Key 



152 



The Home Missionary- 



January, 1900 



West ? Just because in the thinking of the United States there is no such 
place in it. Its very name seems lest in the ashes of every cigar made 
there, though they be of such renown. It is an island ninety miles from 
the coast. 

And if the popular " lack-of-good-beefsteak " comment on tropical life 
is to prevail, and no truer, deeper, factual method resulting from actual 
work on the spot is to guide us, certainly the theory that some places 
are not fit to live in, and some people not worth saving, will blind our 
vision. The people who settled the West enjoyed equal opportunity ; at 







THE BANYAN TREE, KEY WEST, FLORIDA 

least they were all " newcomers " together. Those who enter the tropics 
find people already there. The " newcomer " in Key West and Cuba will 
not only find his old environment gone, but he will enter an older one. 
So he must by hard work break with the old, and by patient, constant toil 
know the one he enters. "All men are dear to God " is a mighty truth. 
To believe it brings the greatest responsibility. To act on it is to make 
men like God. 

Seven years ago thirty men and women called me to Key West to be 
their pastor. They were worshipping in an " upper room " and sail-loft com- 
bined, the city everywhere portraying Zechariah viii. 5 : "And the streets 
of the city shall be full of boys and girls playing in the streets thereof." 



January, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



153 



(Rev. S. F. Gale first applied the passage to Key West.) It has been 
literally true of Key West for years. All of the new church members were 
a Band of Prayer, which had become obnoxious to the mother church that 
gave it birth, and through which most of her accessions were due. A leader 
of this band had been turned out of church, who was so bound to the rest 
that the cord of "prayer" proved stronger than the creed of church name. 
The Band of Prayer had retired to this "upper room," holding Sunday 
services and prayer meetings ; continuing their own (2 p.m.) Sunday 
cottage prayer meetings, which have gone on without break for fourteen 
years ; had organized Sunday-school, Men's Missionary Society, Women's 
and Juvenile's also — all this before I was even asked to advise them what 
to do. For four months this Band-of-Prayer Church lived, grew, and 
labored before they had any pastor at all. On going there I was told that 
no man could manage those people ; 
they were always doing things them- 
selves, etc. Surely the task was taken 
up with much " fear and trembling." 
I have never tried to "manage" 
church members who want to work. 
Our feeble thirty have grown to 258 
in all on church register. Our year- 
by-year revised roll numbers 208. 
There have always been more males 
than females — one year, thirty 
more. 

The first meeting of the Band of Prayer, after the organization of the 
church, resulted in the conversion of J. A. Harris, the first convert of the 
church ; who made it possible for us to get our church lot in a part of 
the city which time has proved to be the best possible. Brother Harris is 
still a faithful, earnest Christian, though for the last three years suffering 
excruciating pain. Many of our people are sponge-fishermen. They must 
be away most of the year, returning four or five times to market their 
sponges. They have a floating Society of Christian Endeavor, resulting 
from a great revival, when more than three score of them were gathered 
into the kingdom and into our church. Returning from a short "sick 
leave of absence " I found these returned converts ashore, holding open- 
air night meetings, the converted making other converts ; and more than 
the number of charter members were received into the church the follow- 
ing Sunday. They had postponed their return to the sponging grounds 
to connect themselves with us. A good majority of that addition, after 
these years, have proved their sincerity. 

The pastor seldom leads a prayer meeting. He sits with good grace 
in the audience, and gets both the "pulpit" and the "pew " in his expe- 




FIRST CONVERT, KEY WEST, FLORIDA 



*54 



The Home Missionary 



January, 1900 



rience. Four out of every five of our accessions have been on confession 
of faith. During the whole seven years the regular services have con- 
tinued without break, through vacations, though but four months in all 
have been taken by the pastor in that time. 

The pastor is now quarantined from his charge by the presence of 
yellow fever, but it is no little joy to know that all the regular preaching 
services are being kept up. If yellow fever has raged, extra services have 
also been held, that it might cease to sadden hearts. Our three licentiates 
are preaching, with good favor shown them. One of these was converted 
from my Bible class. My neighbor-pastor, half a block away, succumbed 
to the dread disease. My people rejoice that I live ; but it is difficult to 

feel respectable 
while they sit in 
sorrow at home 
(November 3, 
1899). 

After so much 
has been written 
in books, maga- 
zines, and news- 
papers about the 
war with Spain, 
one feels loath 
to speak of Jose 
Marti's last visit 
to our city, whose 
manly face 

seemed to foretell that he would go and commence the Cuban war, though 
it cost his life. His face on our streets, with thousands of Cubans surging 
around him, is a picture never to be removed from the wall of one's mem- 
ory ; also the early visit of the battleship Maine in our harbor, with her 
initial letter blazed with incandescent lights from the top of her masts to 
her bull, against a dark sky. I have wondered ever since what that letter 
" M " really stood for. 

Then came the capture of filibustering schooners entering our harbor, 
with a squad of men indifferently fishing with hook and line, to show their 
heedlessness of what would follow. To look at them in the United States 
court-room was to know they were certainly in earnest. How quickly 
followed the heartbreaking stories of starving mothers and children in 
Cuba, their dead bodies filling trash carts just as dead cats and dogs 
had done when picked up from the streets. It was the easiest thing to 
preach about it ; get everybody to give their relief. One word from the 
sermon was, " We cried shame on England concerning Armenia ! What 




POST-OFFICE AND NAVAL STATION, KEY WEST, FLORIDA 



January, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



155 



now about Cuba ? We can almost hear the dying moan of mothers and 
children across these short ninety miles of water ! We must pay dear for 
this ! " Before the " For Starving Cuba " envelopes were returned, which 
was the following Sunday, we did pay — and it broke the nation's heart. 
The Maine blew up. None but those who saw the electric " M " against 
that dark sky, and then the mere shreds of steel in Havana harbor, with 
the first few men who, with -black, burned faces, gashed bodies, singed 
hair and beard, scantily attired in clothes loaned them by Spain's subjects, 
as they entered our hospital, will know forcibly what the price was. 

Soon our harbor became filled with cruisers and torpedo boats ; with 
larger battleships showing on the water line to the south ; steam launches 
screaming day 
and night; 
many - colored 
signal lights 
conversing in 
their secret 
tongue. War 
vessels strip- 
ping for the fray 
till nothing but 
war paint 
showed out- 
wardly and bare 
steel inwardly. 
How terrible 
they looked! 

One's heart almost ceased to beat as he gazed at them 
of old had become the sober-hued eagle of destruction. 

Newspaper reporters filled the town. But the sight of Admiral Samp- 
son's face once in the hotel made one sleep safer. In the waters of the 
harbor there floated a Red Cross ship, in which sat Clara Barton above 
tons of food for Cuba. " Bullets for Spain ! Bread for Cuba ! " This 
seemed, in my soul, to be the language of our harbor for days. 

Our church had its share in helping the Army and Navy Young Men's 
Christian Association, under the management of Rev. R. E. Steele, whose 
work among those who went to Cuba, and the wounded who returned, 
which filled our four hospitals, was untold. Its rooms, though severely 
plain, were brightened by the face of Gen. O. O. Howard, who visited 
every person in the hospital ; also by the labors of Rev. Charles Herald 
of Brooklyn. It was a sign that home is dear when hundreds of soldiers 
spent so much time writing letters. The bullets soon ceased to whir. 
Bread was used most, and that will soon become needless. May the 



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A TYPICAL HOME, KEY WEST, FLORIDA 

The white swan 



156 The Home Missionary January, 1900 

Bread of Life be as eagerly received ! May soldiers of the Cross prove 
as brave in the longer battle against sin ! 

May missionaries learn from Admiral Sampson's vigil in that trying 
blockade, until peace of soul is the possession of millions who live in our 
frostless new territory ! 



THE MISSIONARY SITUATION 

AS DISCUSSED BEFORE THE BOSTON CONGREGATIONAL CLUB, 
AT ITS OCTOBER MEETING, BY FOUR MISSIONARY 
SECRETARIES 

I 

The Situation Stated 
By Secretary George M. Boynton, D.D., 

Of the Sunday-school and Publishing Society 

I take it to be our own missionary situation which we are to consider 
in this Congregational Club ; and our situation as a denomination is bound 
up with the good fortunes or the failures of our six national missionary 
organizations — the representatives of four of which you are to have the 
joy of hearing to-night. We are not considering the field at large, but 
only how we are tilling our corner of it. 

First of all, it is not the situation of an unsuccessful or decadent cause 
that we are to consider. It is the condition of a work whose prosperity 
is its embarrassment ; a work of the results of which, in every depart- 
ment, we should be proud, if we had not learned to give God the glory. 
Look for a moment at the statement of what can be stated in figures. One 
of these societies has in the last seventeen years organized about 7,000 
Sunday-schools, three-fourths of them or more where there was no Chris- 
tian work, of which 760 have grown into Congregational churches, most 
of them still reported in the Year Book. Another aids in the support of 
more than 1,800 missionaries, who supply nearly 3,000 stations, at an 
average cost for each man of less than $300. To the churches thus min- 
istered to, nearly 8,000 additions were made during the last year on Con- 
fession of Faith. Another has aided in building 3,000 churches and 650 
parsonages. Another has helped to educate 8,000 ministers, and has 
planted or aided 30 colleges and 20 academies, in which to-day 4,000 
young people are preparing for influential lives. Another sustains each 
year 105 schools in the South and West, with 14,156 pupils. It has fitted, 



January, 1900 The Home Missionary 157 

directly and indirectly, thousands of negro teachers to enlighten the dark- 
ness of their own people. It has called into being 230 Congregational 
churches, with 12,500 members, the additions for the past year being 
1,450. And the oldest of them all — not yet decrepit — employs in foreign 
lands nearly 4,000 missionaries and native helpers ; has about 500 churches, 
with nearly 50,000 members, and 1,270 schools, with nearly 60,000 mem- 
bers, with a medical work reaching perhaps 200,000 patients. 

It is evidently no question of failure which confronts us, nor is there 
a dearth of devoted and earnest men and women eager to carry on the 
work. The Student Volunteer movement is, in its spirit, not confined to 
the foreign field. Iowa bands of old are succeeded by Washington and 
Maine bands of the later days. A new opening occurs in Cuba, and 
a Massachusetts pastor waits for no appointment, but enters at once. 
Alaska attracts gold seekers, and a seeker for souls from beautiful Cali- 
fornia appeals to be sent up into the cold winter and the sunless days, and 
wins a success almost unparalleled in American missions. There are mis- 
sionaries enough — men waiting to be sent for every most difficult field, 
for every most arduous work. 

The situation, then, so far as the word implies a limitation, a lack — a 
something less or other than ought to be — is a financial situation. It is a 
lack of money. God's grace is abundant ; missionary grace is sufficient ; 
givers' grace seems to be the lacking quality. And yet let us not be 
unjust to the givers. As Mr. Capen has shown in his valuable addresses 
at Portland and at Providence, the gifts of our Congregational Christians 
for missionary purposes have increased much faster than the increase in 
population — at least, up to 1890 — and twenty-five per cent, faster than the 
increase in the wealth of the country. They are larger in proportion to 
the valuation of its church property than those of any other denomination. 
The falling off of the few past years is easily accounted for. 

We are, at any rate, not worse than others in this matter of giving ; 
and yet the situation is appalling as we compare the call with the answer, 
the need with the supply. All of our six societies could do much more if 
the treasuries were fuller. Some of them, from the nature of their work, 
have been forced to incur large indebtedness ; the others, which from the 
nature of theirs could avoid this embarrassment, have been compelled to 
severe curtailment. All have worked under great disabilities — the mills 
running at half-time, not because of lack of either producers or consumers, 
but of water power. 

What is the trouble ? Is it lack of rain, or is it because of a misuse of 
the heaven-sent supply by wastage or by diversion ? Such a condition 
raises all sorts of questions — of wisdom of organization, of extravagance 
in administration, of parsimony in giving. These questions are not raised 
by those who do not give ; they come from the earnest and cooperative 



158 The Home Missionary January, 1900 

friends of part or all of our organized work. It is evident that either there 
must be too lavish expenditure or too stinted supply, or both ; and it is 
not strange that those who give rather question the economy or sagacity 
of those who spend ; while those who distribute these missionary funds 
wonder why those who contribute do not give enough to meet at least 
the essential demands. 

Among the questions which have arisen from the first of these two 
sides — the givers — is that of federation ; i. e., as to whether the organiza- 
tion for our missionary work is not too complicated, or, rather, whether 
the organizations are not too numerous. This is not a new idea. It has 
been thought of much, or at least spoken of frequently, for years, though 
with little practical suggestion. It must be borne in mind that these six 
societies were not made to order, as the result of a logical division of the 
missionary work into departments. They are growths — two of them, at 
least — already composed each of three federated elements. It may be re- 
membered by at least a few of the ancients among us, that obediently fol- 
lowing the advice of the National Council, the Sunday-school Society, on 
April Fool's Day, in 1876, gave over its missionary work into the hands 
of the Congregational Home Missionary Society. The result was the 
almost entire disappearance of the Sunday-school funds and work, and 
such disappointment at the result that its resumption by the society or- 
ganized to do it was heartily approved by the council six years later. The 
suspicion abides that the society took this first advice too seriously and as 
of more " force than there was force in the reason of it." 

Personally, I am by no means opposed to some form of federation, if, 
through it, as vigorous a prosecution of the work of each department and 
as liberal a support for it can be conserved. This is the object of all 
organization. There will have to be as many departments as there are 
to-day, whether they become bureaus of one grander organization or not. 
It is noticeable that the Presbyterian Church has boards almost exactly 
agreeing in their scope with our societies, and equal to them in number. 
This suggests some naturalness in their growth, and a possible law in 
"The Origin of Species," which it might be well for some ecclesiastical 
Darwin to study out for us. 

As for the secretaries, I am sure they all desire to avoid competition. 
You do not realize how fully they confer with one another in plans for 
the common good of the work entrusted to them. You do not know how 
glad they are to speak for one another, and, like modern John Aldens, 
plead one another's causes. It was only a few years ago — I think I am 
telling no forbidden secrets — that, at a meeting where all the societies 
were represented, every secretary present declared himself opposed to 
special pleas, to emergency calls for his own society ; but the secretaries 
could not control that matter. It was not three months before Lwo of the 



January, 1900 The Home Missionary 159 

societies printed special pleas for support, signed by the names of their 
whole committees, and soon the third "came tumbling after." 

For me, I heartily believe in the doctrine of Dr. Joseph Parker ex- 
ploited not long ago in The Congregationalist. As I remember it, Dr. 
Parker claimed that, while the liberty of each church must be absolutely 
preserved, the churches have a perfect right to combine for the management 
of their common work. I do not believe in organizations independent of 
the churches in their management, and wholly dependent on them for 
their support. I believe in federation, if our churches want it. I will not 
discuss the various methods recently proposed. I only trust federation 
may keep in mind, and secure in the result, the conservation of force. 

A majority of the six societies, the brethren may be glad to know, 
have already taken action looking toward a conference which shall con- 
sider and discuss this whole matter of federation. This will, I take it, 
be a meeting not of officials only, but of laymen and ministers, who are 
familiar with the workings of these organizations, and who will be able to 
see both sides of all the questions involved. The societies are not hold- 
ing back from a full discussion, but welcome it, in the hope that it may 
lead to a better understanding of the matter, and, if possible, to a practi- 
cal result. 

While this consideration of the methods of work and of the use of the 
money devoted to missions is going on, on the one hand ; on the side of 
those through whom it is expended the question as to how to secure 
enough to do the needed work is never out of mind. Indeed, the same 
men are asking both, and are naturally interested in both the question of 
collection and disbursement. 

Clara Barton had evidently been sitting over against the treasury 
when she said that the few who gave, gave largely, and the large majority 
gave nothing. We may need to deepen the wells, but we are forever going 
to the wells which yield, and drilling for more oil ; and it is wonderful 
how some of these wells comply with the demand. We are forever going 
to those who give for greater gifts, while the larger part of our constitu- 
ency excuses itself, and is excused, from, any share in this blessedness. 
So far as these generous and large givers are concerned, what is needed 
is more discrimination on their part, better planning and a feeling of 
responsibility for the work to which we, as a denomination, are pledged. 
There is that scattereth and doesn't increase. He that provideth not for 
his own, is no better than some other men. 

We need to increase the area of drainage. We need the gifts of the 
five-sixths of our church membership which practically give nothing. 
If you have ever studied the contents of your contribution plates, or boxes, 
or baskets, or pouches, or whatever you use, you would know that this is 
so. We used to get in my society an annual collection of $1,000, and 



160 The Home Missionary January, 1900 

from $25 to $50 from one church in this city. The $1,000 came from one 
man ; the $25 to $50 from all the rest. Our people who are not quite 
well off are allowed to take the poor debtor's oath and go into benevolent 
bankruptcy. (If you say that is not a proper use of the adjective, it is 
as good as its use for gifts of charity in any connection.) 

Now, brethren, we have had a plan submitted to the churches through 
our National Council, a definite plan, the purpose of which is to try to 
meet this want. To spread the area of drainage, so that not only from 
the deep springs and artesian wells of wealth, but from the hundreds 
of little streams which run down the hillsides, and the irrigating ditches 
which take their places in a rainless country, there may be gathered those 
" little drops of water " which, as we used to sing in the infant class, 
" fill the mighty ocean." It is a plan worth studying, worth discussing, 
worth trying ; or Mr. Capen would never have condensed the electricity 
which was in the air, and (for the protection of his native city) discharged 
it in Portland, Ore. It is a plan to reach every church, and every mem- 
ber of every church. Why, that in itself is a grand advance, if you do not 
get an extra cent, to get the gospel of missionary work before every man, 
woman, and child in our Congregational fellowship. 

It is a proposition to increase the gifts to all our societies twenty-five 
per cent. That is a great advance, and will be a giant lift to all our work, 
worth any effort it can cost. It makes a definite suggestion to every State, 
and leaves each State to distribute the advance it should make by its own 
suggestions, which reach all the way down to every local church. And 
while here and there a man resents a suggestion, a hundred will welcome 
one which will give them some idea of what is the least they ought to 
do. It makes no arbitrary suggestion, but bases the amount asked for 
by the amount already given and expended, and the distribution of it by 
the proportion already given by the churches to each organization, as 
representing what, as a whole, the denomination has voted to do. Now, of 
course, this plan is not perfect. I might tinker it a little in the interest of 
the work to which my life is given. But I wouldn't, for I believe that on 
the whole, and in the long run, if our churches and their members will 
try it, it will increase all our work — largely and permanently. Let's 
try it. 

There are two sacraments of Christian followship ; two ways of com- 
muning, and the New Testament word is the same for both. One is the 
Lord's table, where in symbol we receive him who gave himself for us. 
The other is the contribution box, where, in symbol, we give ourselves to 
him. 

" Man, like a vine, supported lives. 
His strength comes from th' embrace he gives." 



January, 1900 The Home Missionary 161 

II 

Opportunity, the Mark of the "Situation" 
By Secretary C. O. Day, Education Society 

In undertaking to fill the place of the veteran secretary of the Ameri- 
can Missionary Association, I am no doubt illustrating the phrase that 
"fools rush in where angels fear to tread ; " nor can I expect to say any- 
thing of value in the close-fitting discussion that the other speakers can 
give to the special problems involved in the missionary situation. I can 
but speak in general terms ; and yet there are certain broad aspects of 
the missionary effort of our churches, as conducted through their organ- 
ized societies, which are worth considering. A previous speaker has aptly 
said that Admiral Dewey should be left to a well-earned repose, and yet I 
think he would find a place in our present talk had he been generally seen, 
not amid the tremendous ovations of great cities, but in the homely seclu- 
sion of his native town among the Vermont hills. Thus seen, he cer- 
tainly and specially impresses upon the mind that which he stands for in 
the thought of to-day. Whereas we have stood like the silent explorer 
"upon a peak in Darien," looking toward the Pacific with wonder and 
doubt as to the future, to see the hero of America in Asia in the close 
contact of the home reception makes one feel as though his very head 
were "thumped" against the Celestial Empire, so near are those distant 
interests made to come. Whether the Admiral is giving his greeting to a 
little child, or whether the people are looking at the beacon light flashing 
out over the sea of hills, the feeling is that we have arrived and stand in 
the presence of "the future ; " and the thought of the hour gathers itself 
up in one great word, "Opportunity." It seems to me that this is the 
word best descriptive of the missionary situation, and there are three ele- 
ments in it to which I would call special attention. 

1. The first is, the recognition, increasingly prevailing, of the truth 
that human development goes on under a two-fold law, or by a two-fold 
process, and that both of these factors are necessary, and are equally of 
the Divine plan. One of these is the enlarged extension of the frame- 
work of organized human society over great areas of the world, and in- 
creasing magnitudes of population. The other is, the making good of the 
needs of human growth in a compensating way by a development from 
within outward, and by a reaction of inward force and genius against the 
pressure of the external frame; but both of them, as has been said, 
belong to the Divine intention. The first of these, the extending of 
the framework of organized society, is a patent fact, and is assumed on 
all sides to be essential to progress, under whatever phrase described, 



162 The Home Missionary January, 1900 

whether "sphere of influence," or Monroe Doctrine (meaning "other 
hands off and ours on "), or extension, or expansion, or — in the nomencla- 
ture, not of America, as falsely asserted, but it may be of Russia or Great 
Britain — imperialism. The name is of less consequence than the fact of 
the tendency of the age. This tendency is right, and will go on until the 
divinely appointed limitations shall be reached. Just where those are, no 
man can say. The best word upon the subject is that of the Apostle 
Paul, when he says that God " hath determined the bounds of their habi- 
tation," that within them (mark here the compensatory reaction) "men 
might feel after him and find him, though he be not far from every one of 
us." The delimitation of such frameworks may depend upon various cir- 
cumstances — mountain ranges, oceans and seas, climate, race distinctions, 
or, in a profound region, moral inequalities at the basis of character. But 
toward some final demarkation we move, and when the outlying problems 
are settled, conferences like the recent assembly at The Hague will not be 
affairs of future, but of present, result. Then will come the true parlia- 
ment of the nations, establishing and perpetuating peace. 

They are wise who recognize the first of these two aspects of progress 
as of the Divine order as well as the second : they stand on Christian 
ground. It was the pleading of Jeremiah ; it was the providential mean- 
ing of Cyrus and Alexander, throwing up highways for the progress of 
Christ's Kingdom. Paul marched over Roman roads. It has been be- 
neath the extension of civilized framework that the inward growth, to 
which the word " Christian " has been too exclusively applied, has best 
proceeded, except at special crises, where, in the still unbalanced progres- 
sion of life, the work of outward organization has absorbed all forces. 
The essential point is, that there is no inherent conflict between outer and 
inner, and that to acknowledge the truth, is wisdom. The best leadership 
for the colored people of the South bids them accept the authority of law, 
and present conditions of orderly peace ; and devote themselves to inter- 
nal and personal improvement. The dangerous element in Mormon au- 
thority seems to deny such overspreading order in setting up another, 
which shall take precedence, in case of a collision, over national law. 
The hopeful sign the world over is the securing, amid all nations, and for 
all homes and communities, for all individuals, old or young, such frame- 
work of organized protection that, within it, all may have a sure right to 
grow up and become individually strong and possess the full opportunity 
included in the familiar though inadequate words, of "life, liberty, and 
the pursuit of happiness." Freedom comes in the fullness of life and not 
in the perpetual resentment toward, and resistance of, the external organ- 
ization of human conditions, provided that this grows more and more to 
be humane, pure, and Christian. 

2. The second point in the opportunity of the missionary situation 



January, 1900 The Home Missionary 163 

now appears. It lies in the peculiar fitness of the Congregational order 
of religious life to provide the compensatory inward development in the 
fullest and highest degree. To make good the effect of the extension of 
outward influence, there must be the most energetic reaction within. This 
must be, in its root, religious. The upward springing force is of God ; 
the relation of the individual to God must be personal and immediate. 
Anywhere and everywhere in the country, or in the world, whatever, may 
be the present computation of ecclesiastical numbers, or even the type of 
the popular trend of taste, that conception of the shaping of religious 
life which holds the future, and can best elevate men under any skies, in 
the heart of Africa, or in the heart of New York or Chicago, is intrinsi- 
cally that form which energizes within the deepest religious nature of man 
in the sharpest contrast to, and completest independence of, external gov- 
ernmental authority. This is not a relation of antagonism; it is ! a rela- 
tion of compensation, and of securing in the fullest degree the complete 
influence which is needed to build man up to the measure of the stature 
of his possibilities. The principle of " non-conformity " is a permanently 
necessary principle. The tendency to fall in more and more with an 
identification of state and church is a dangerous tendency. Supposing 
that we imagine the area of organized governmental framework to be 
arched over with glass of a certain color ; one present tendency is to en- 
close the interior religious life with a covering of such a hue as precisely 
to repeat upon those who live within it the hue of the state. The other 
is to make that inner shield of such counteracting or combining color as 
shall cause to fall upon those growing up within the absolute white light 
of the truth. This last is the conception of non-conformity ; this is the 
genius of the Congregational order. It builds upon and seeks to transmit 
the energy of the Divine life by an immediate, unconstrained process. It 
places supreme emphasis upon the individual, and it holds the individual 
to the authority of his own conscience. It places his conscience at the 
point of vision by the fullest measure of mental training. It stands for a 
full-orbed education. It thus provides the process which delivers from 
any repression by overarching authority, and secures the fullest liberty 
under law for all whom it touches. Its polity emphasizes the responsi- 
bility of the individual church member ; its pulpit makes perpetual appeal 
to the individual heart and conscience by the mighty preaching of the 
Gospel. 

It is therefore the one method of the application of the Divine force to 
human life which can make good the first of the tendencies, also recog- 
nized as of God ; and therefore it stands before the mind as, in the provi- 
dence of God, the need of mankind everywhere to-day. 

3. Now, once again, the third and last element in the opportunity of 
the " situation " is, I believe, the readiness of our Congregational churches 



164 The Home Missionary January, 1 



„: 



to be aroused to the wonderful character of this our present high calling. 
If they are not yet fully awakened, they can be and are ready to be. If 
they are not soon, probably the responsibility should be laid upon the 
pulpit, where is the spring of power and the special channel of utterance 
for the Divine intentions. The arousement, for which our churches are 
waiting, may be approached on one of several lines. The great danger is 
that one side may be overemphasized at the expense of matters more 
essential. The thoughts in the air now all center in the reorganization of 
method, in matters of benevolence ; and this is of great importance. It 
is a striking evidence of the independence of the Congregational mind 
that, of its own accord, it so readily welcomes suggestions looking toward 
system. The plan worked out by the Committee of Fifteen is an admira- 
ble effort to order and enlarge the habit and sense of responsibility which 
ought to obtain in our benevolences. Probably the State Associations are 
the proper bodies for carrying forward this effort, and it is interesting to 
see that beginnings have been made, as in Missouri ; and there is no rea- 
son why, before the next meeting of the National Council, all the State 
Associations may not undertake this great enterprise. Let us not, how- 
ever, substitute a betterment in form, or mislead ourselves by the com- 
fortable appearance of having transacted important business, so far that 
we forget the much more radical and effective efforts which make these 
things good. More than of organization, there is need of education. 
Scarcely one church in ten has anything like a systematic method of train- 
ing up the membership or the youth in a thorough knowledge of the com- 
ing of Christ's kingdom in its world-wide relations. Never was material 
so full ; never were the affairs of men, the world over, so open to view ; 
never were the interests of Christianity and the changing conditions of 
human life so evidently intermingled and interdependent ; never were 
books of exploration and travel and of keen observation by masters of the 
study of human life — works which carry back to early origins, to primitive 
though present conditions, or boldly reach out to national and continental 
reconstructions — so abundant and interesting. In fact the one interesting 
subject is the kingdom of God in its universal aspects, whether treated as 
national or social or personal. The great missionary societies have been 
organized to deal with these aspects, and to extend that kingdom ; but 
both as to the conditions of the problem and the work to be done, it must 
be confessed that ignorance is dense. Yet light is a transmutable mode 
of heat ; where there is knowledge the sentiments of the people will have 
that whereon they may feed, and the fire will wax hot. But even more 
than this there is need of inspiration,— that the churches be made to feel, 
as they are ready to be made, provided the strong earnest voice ring out 
the word, — that they are in the world, not to be content to leave things as 
they are, or to stand on one side and witness a process of evolution, or to 



January, 1900 The Home Missionary 165 

grow weary in well doing, but, as "ministers of his," called "to do his 
pleasure," to make "all things new," and to effect this under the leader- 
ship and by the living power and as compelled by the mighty love of 
Christ. He indeed is the source of this inspiration, through force of grati- 
tude to him for what he gives, in himself, and by the innumerable chan- 
nels of blessing which are his work ; of loyalty to him, not merely as 
one looks into his' face, but discerns and loves the possible Christ in the 
life of every man. The spirit of chilliness, timidity, criticism, which too 
much prevails, is not native to the heart of our churches ; abhorrent, 
rather ; something from which they would be delivered, that they may 
enter into the joy of the Lord. So that if I were to sum up our present 
needs in view of the opportunity presented by the missionary situation, 
and especially this last feature, namely, the readiness of the churches to be 
aroused to appreciate and embrace it, and if, naming the three factors in 
the awakening, I should measure each in degrees, I should say, let us have 
of organization one hundred degrees, of education one thousand degrees, 
and of inspiration an infinite degree. 



Ill 

What is the Matter with the Situation? 

By Secretary J. B. Clark, of the Home Missionary Society 

I am not sure that some one has not erred in throwing the discussion 
of this question upon four missionary secretaries. Every missionary 
secretary is a born optimist. I know of no one who can excel him in this 
character unless it be a Western College President. The secretary can 
be nothing but an optimist. He is in daily touch with the choicest men 
and women of the churches. His mail is heavy with letters of sympathy, 
and often with something more substantial than sympathy from those who 
burn with missionary zeal. When receipts run low, he will find a dozen 
reasons for the failure rather than any indifference to the cause he loves. 
When called to discuss the missionary situation, he is prone to see nothing 
the matter with it except hard times which, once past, the old conditions of 
prosperity will return. 

Seven years ago all our missionary treasuries were full ; there were no 
debts. The Home Missionary Society was receiving an annual average 
increment of about $20,000 for new work, enough to justify the hope of a 
round million in 1900 for home missions alone. Almost out of a clear 
sky the bolt of disaster fell, stripping away not only the annual increment, 
but cutting down current resources to the amount of $150,000 in a single 
year. Debt followed with all its evils — sudden retrenchment, starvation 



1 66 The Home Missionary January, 1900 

salaries, closed churches, universal despair. " These conditions will pass 
with their cause," said the optimistic secretaries ; but they have not passed, 
The wave of commercial distress has swept on. The days of plenty and 
prosperity are returning, but they do not bring back the missionary incomes 
of the past, and there is no sign of their coming on the whole horizon. I 
know the familiar explanation. "You must wait. You must give the 
people time to recoup themselves and their families and their business;" 
but such an apology is itself an indictment of the missionary spirit of the 
churches. It is at war with the first principle of the Gospel which com- 
mands us to seek first the Kingdom of God, and let self and family and 
business wait. 

So, Mr. President, while I am still a confessed optimist, and hope liv- 
ing and dying to remain one, I am not so blind as not to discern that 
something more than the ordinary is the matter with the missionary situa- 
tion. 

Unquestionably, the financial distress of the last seven years is a con- 
siderable factor. It once fell to me to construct and publish a red line 
chart, showing at a glance of the eye the history of home missionary con- 
tributions for seventy years. It looks like a billowy range of mountains. 
Every important event in the history of the church and of the business 
world is registered on that sensitive chart. The panic of 1838, that of 
1858, and that of 1873 are three big scoops in the line. Four years of 
public newspaper criticism is another deep valley. The war of 1861 is 
almost a precipice, while our greatest and latest panic plunged our chart 
into a black gorge from which it has not yet begun to emerge. Yet note, 
and this for optimists, following every depression in that sensitive line 
there is a corresponding rise to a height never before attained, and, there- 
fore, judging from the past I dare to believe and predict that when the 
present situation has been accurately diagnosed, and the true remedy 
applied, my poor chart will climb to a mountain top that shall look down 
triumphantly upon the whole story of the past. 

What else is the matter with the missionary situation ? Beyond all 
question, there is more or less distrust in the air with regard to present 
methods of missionary organization and administration ; and nothing para- 
lyzes the giving nerve of the churches like an atmosphere of distrust — the 
more vague the more dangerous. 

Unreservedly, therefore, I say let this distrust, now so dim and almost 
intangible, come out into the open and court a full and fair discussion in 
the good old American and Congregational way. It may be the time has 
come for the reconstruction of organized home and foreign missions. I 
know of no boards or committees that have any wish to smother the inquiry. 
Indeed, the Executive Committee of the Home Missionary Society has by 
formal vote invited the corresponding committees of all other societies to 



January, 1900 The Home Missionary 167 

meet and debate this very question, and all have responded favorably to 
the call. It may be the day of federation has come. It may be that 
combination and consolidation, and even the hitherto un-Congregational 
assessment of the churches, are demanding a trial. Let our wisest men 
meet and discuss these supposed remedies. We have no fear for the result. 
We are all seeking the same thing — the best way. But in the search for 
new methods, we shall never forget that under our present unfederated 
and voluntary methods, Congregationalists have for many years led all 
other churches, both in the aggregate and in the per caput of their mis- 
sionary contributions. We cannot afford to imperil that splendid record. 
If federation does not swell missionary receipts, it is, to say the least, a 
doubtful experiment ; but should it end in reducing our present missionary 
income, the result would be a stupendous blunder which, for one, I do not 
believe intelligent Congregationalists will ever commit. 

Some years ago I found myself traveling in the same car with a vener- 
able Bishop of the Methodist Church. I found him very happy over the 
success of that church in having raised $ 1,000,000 for home and foreign 
missions by a pro rata assessment upon its churches. He was ready for 
my congratulations, but I said to him : " Bishop, it is a wonder to me that 
the great Methodist Church, with from two to three million members, 
should raise so little for missions, while our feeble Congregational folk, 
less than half a million strong, raised last year $1,200,000 for the same 
purpose." At first he doubted the statement, but I had the printed figures 
at hand and easily convinced him. Finally he asked : " Pray tell me how 
you gather so much money from so few people ? " " First," I replied, " by 
liberally educating them in all the missionary work of the church, and 
then, secondly, we have the advantage of you, Bishop, in our voluntary 
method ; we never assess for benevolence. Here is a church," I said, 
"on your plan with about fifty members ; they are assessed $15 toward 
the million. Now, to my certain knowledge, this church is able to give 
more than three times $15 for missions. Yet they are satisfied, and you 
are satisfied with $15 only. Thus you are wronging the church by your 
system ; you are dwarfing their ability to give, which should be devel- 
oped. On the other hand, we say to our churches : Here is the cause. 
Give now according to your sense of its importance, and give as the Lord 
has prospered you. The result is, our people are giving at the rate of 
$3 per member to home and foreign missions, while yours are giving at 
less than 30 cents per member. " When we parted, the Bishop had the 
kindness to say: "I think a good deal is to be said in favor of your 
voluntary method." 

Mr. President, whatever reforms are before us they will be for the 
better, and not for the worse ; they will develoD — not contract— the giv- 
ing power of the churches. v IN 5 DAYS jq 



1 68 The Home Missionary January, 1900 

For one, I wish here to say that I have great faith in the scheme of 
the Committee of Fifteen, even as I have great admiration for the skill 
and wisdom of its chairman. But it is a disheartening fact that several 
State bodies have allowed it to pass by default. Indeed, it is one of the 
symptoms of an evil missionary situation that a scheme so natural, so 
reasonable, and so feasible should not be put upon trial at once with 
the heartiest good-will and interest of every church in the land. 

Is anything else the matter with the missionary situation ? We have 
been told that a whole new realm of appeals have come to the front dur- 
ing the last ten years, dividing and absorbing the gifts of our churches ; 
and they are not unworthy objects. Congregationalists have never been 
distinguished by rigid loyalty to their own ; it has been their pride rather 
that they are not narrowly sectarian in their sympathies. Thus, uncon- 
sciously, they have distributed their gifts at the cost of interests that are 
distinctively Congregational ; and to this fact alone is largely due the fall- 
ing off of our regular missionary receipts. Most of our large givers, and 
many of the small ones, are to-day literally mortgaged by the munificent 
yet heavily conditioned offers of Dr. Pearsons. They stand pledged fcr 
years to come to the claims of our Congregational colleges East and West. 
I am not at all convinced that this is an unmixed evil. Perhaps the time 
has come when colleges should be equipped with new power. An unedu- 
cated constituency is not a giving constituency, and perhaps the present 
halt in the missionary column is necessary for the better advance of all 
missionary interests in the future. But it explains, in part, the present 
conditions. Pray God that this paralysis may not continue too long until 
the work of home and foreign missions shall be irretrievably ruined, and 
the costly investments of the past be lost to the church and the world ! 

Yet, say all that we may about these superficial causes, we know full 
well the worm that gnaws the root of all our missionary enterprise. The 
sources of zeal and devotion need to be deepened and enlarged. It is 
utterly trite to say, although it is utterly true, that the stream cannot rise 
higher than the spring from which it flows. The trouble is with the 
spring. Beyond all question, the material spirit of these times has fatally 
invaded the churches, and casts a black shadow over many of them, dry- 
ing up the sources of missionary supply. 

One of our leading pastors spent a large part of his vacation last 
summer visiting and interviewing Congregational business men — men who 
stand at the head of large concerns, and bear burdens of which their 
fathers never dreamed. He put to these burdened men such questions as 
these : " What is the effect of your business upon your spiritual life ? 
Does it draw you away from the church of God and from the praying circle 
of his friends ? Are you conscious of a decline of interest in the church 
and its missionary obligations?" And in every instance, sometimes with 



January, 1900 The Home Missionary 169 

indifference and more often with sadness, came the affirmative reply to 
his inquiries. And in relating his experience to a company of his brother 
clergymen he added this sad and prophetic remark : "In my opinion there 
are to be many broken-hearted pastors in the next twenty years." 

Brethren, there are many broken-hearted pastors to-day, pastors who, 
after their most heroic efforts, have to look on and see their best friends 
and supporters engulfed in the whirlpools of worldly business and pleas- 
ure, their love for the church and its objects dissipated, and their financial 
support slowly but surely alienated from sacred things. It is even thus 
that churches fall away in their interest and their gifts and lapse into that 
great army of churches which President Angell described in his opening 
address at the International Council : " When a church," said he, "ceases 
to be a missionary church its decadence has begun." 

Alas ! we have many such churches that have forgotten the marching 
orders of their King, and they handicap every missionary endeavor. But 
there are good signs in the sky. It is a good sign when the Baptist and 
Methodist pastors of New York City resolve that for the coming year in 
their Monday meetings they will discuss no questions that do not bear 
directly upon the spiritual needs of themselves and their churches. It is 
another happy omen when the Presbyterian pastors of the same city set 
apart a whole day every month, when they will together retreat from the 
busy world and meditate upon their needs, and upon the sources of their 
spiritual power, saying only such words and lifting such prayers as the 
spirit may dictate. Such signs indicate, at least, that the leaders sense 
the danger and need of the hour. 

As Congregationalists, we cannot be behind our brethren of other 
churches in seeking to deepen the springs of missionary devotion and 
stopping the wastes which have kept our treasuries empty and our work 
in a dying condition. 

Some years since it was my pleasure to entertain in my own home 
Miss Sarah F. Smiley. In the course of conversation she told me the 
story of that wonderful well near her beautiful home in Saratoga. She 
had ordered the well to be sunk on her premises. After digging a few 
feet it filled with a sweet and apparently full supply, but the next morn- 
ing it was empty. She ordered another depth to be tried. The well 
filled again, but in twenty-four hours it was empty. She then directed 
that this well should be sunk until the mystery should be solved. It was 
soon discovered in a sunken drain filled with loose stones, made no one 
knows when, but which had fatally drained the life of the well above it. 
This sunken drain cut off, the well filled and remains full till this day. 

The meaning of the parable is too obvious. We are not a poor 
people. If the accepted figures are correct, and they have never been 
questioned, Congregationalists of America in fairly good times are adding 



170 The Home Missionary January, 1900 

$20,000,000 annually to their personal wealth, and from this clear incre- 
ment above all the cost of living they are contributing seven cents on 
every dollar to home and foreign missions. What is the meaning of this 
grotesque disproportion ? Sunken drains, sunken drains, of a thousand 
kinds and names. Cut off these wasting drains, and the wells of salvation 
will no more run dry. The enormous money power of the church will be 
consecrated unto God and the Kingdom will come in a day. 



IV 

The Motive 

By Secretary James L. Barton, D.D., of the American Board 

In the minds of most Christians, missions and money bear close and 
intimate relations. The representatives of the various missionary societies 
dwell so much upon debts, retrenchment, appropriations, and donations, 
that to many, a missionary society is primarily a financial organization 
that is supported by begging. In connection with the financial question, 
educational plants, multitudes of pupils, the good work of graduates, 
courses of study, and such matters, are dwelt upon and emphasized until 
the end and aim of the entire work appear to be educational. Then 
there follows on the work that is done in the line of publication, church 
building, industrial, humanitarian, political, and social reform, until even 
experts are confused as to what mission work means and novices are 
confounded. 

It is no wonder that we hear it declared on every side that we need a 
new motive for missions. It is a natural conclusion that if the old motive 
or motives lead to these confusing results, we need something new to 
unify the work and rally the forces. 

It does not seem to me that we need a new motive ; but we do need 
to look beyond that which is upon the surface of this work, that we may 
be sure of the true motive that lies behind it all. 

What is a motive? It is that which incites to motion or action, the 
determining impulse, the moving cause. Confusion comes from con- 
founding the end, or result, with the motive that inspires. In the com- 
mercial world there is intense activity. Merchant ships dot the seas, 
goods-trains span the continents, warehouses and factories crowd our 
cities, millions of men are in the service ; and yet, to create a merchant 
navy, to build and maintain railroads, to erect warehouses and factories, 
and to employ able and worthy men, is no part of the motive that inspires 
mercantile life. These things are results, not motives. The great 
moneyed organizations that open up mines, control manufactures, influ- 



January, 1900 The Home Missionary 171 

ence legislation, and, in many cases, seem to menace free institutions, do 
not exist because of these plain results. The product of the great cor- 
porate bodies are not the motives that lead to their foundation nor that 
inspire activity. In both of the cases mentioned, the motive that is 
responsible for everything is the desire for wealth. It is this that leads to 
every mercantile effort ; that produces the great combinations that build 
warehouses, that bridge oceans, and pile up capital to dangerous propor- 
tions. This one burning desire in the hearts of men is the sufficient and 
adequate motive for all of the results that are so apparent. 

Our country is noted for its educational institutions, from the kinder- 
garten to the great universities. Large fortunes are annually expended 
in the erection of buildings, and in the maintenance of these many and 
varied schools. An army of trained men is constantly employed as 
teachers and instructors, while millions of our youth are spending other 
large fortunes to maintain themselves while they pass their time in study. 
Is the motive that these teachers may be employed, that fine buildings 
be erected, that boys and girls of our country may be educated ? No : 
the one inspiring motive is the desire for education, without which 
school-houses, teachers, and students are impossible. But given the 
desire, in intensity, and all these results follow as effect follows the cause. 
A nation's school system is not measured by the national affection for 
school-houses, or national admiration for teachers, or a national desire 
for students ; but it is measured by the nation's love for education. 

God so loved the world that he gave his only begotten Son, that who- 
soever believeth on him should not perish but have everlasting life. 
What was the motive of this supreme act of Deity ? Not that the Son 
might be given for the world, or that the world, through him, might be 
saved from destruction. These were the results of the motive that lies 
back of the coming of the Son of God ; and that motive was, and is, God's 
love for the world lost in sin. This motive, God's love, was so great and 
so impelling that the Son was sent, and a way of salvation was opened to 
a lost world. Without that love there could have been no Redeemer and 
no salvation. 

After these illustrations of the meaning of motive, let us apply the 
same principles to our missionary work. In order to a clear understand- 
ing, we need to define what we mean by " missionary work." We mean 
" an effort to establish the Kingdom of God in all the earth," or " to make 
the Gospel of Jesus Christ universal in its acceptance and application." 
We see at once that these definitions in no way reveal the motive. 
They state only the result arrived at in the effort put forth. They indi- 
cate a world to be redeemed ; but back of it all is the motive that 
impelled and inspired. 

For the work of missions the motive must be permanent, universal, and 



172 The Home Missionary January, 1900 

efficient. There is no need of change ; there can be none. Methods of 
action under the impulse of motives may change with altered circum- 
stances, but the motive itself remains the same. As Christian mission 
work is world-wide in its activity and application, the motive must be 
universal, adapted to all conditions of men in all lands and in all ages. 
It must be sufficient to lead men to act and to produce the results. An 
insufficient motive ceases to be a motive. The motive for the conduct of 
Christian missions cannot fail to carry with it force enough and inspiration 
enough to unite the Christian world in an effort to make universal the 
Gospel of Christ in its acceptance and application. In a word, the true 
motive for our mission work cannot fail to be unchangeable, universal, 
and sufficient to keep the Christian forces of the entire world in active 
operation until all men shall be saved through Christ. 

We have such a motive for our work. It is loyalty to Jesus Christ. 
This is the motive, not for home missions alone, not for foreign missions 
alone, but for every Christian act that has for its end the bringing of the 
world to Christ. The first step that marks the dividing line between the 
Christian and the non-Christian is the step that leads to a confession of 
loyalty to Jesus Christ. Every one who bears the name of Christian, in 
the very name confesses that he is loyal to Christ as Master. The desire 
for wealth is so weak in some, and so overshadowed by different motives 
in others, that many remain poor all their lives. The desire for education 
for similar reasons is frequently inoperative, so that men grow up and die 
in profound ignorance ; also the fundamental motive for Christian ac- 
tivity may be so flickering, and other and baser motives may so over- 
power it, that the confessing Christian will reveal his loyalty only in the 
name he bears. This is neither loyalty nor Christianity. 

Loyalty demands obedience. It does not consist in confessing a belief 
in Christ in the prayer meeting, or in acknowledging allegiance to him 
about the sacramental table. These confessions must be made to live the 
life of obedience to his wishes and commands. The loyal citizen is not 
the one that can profess his allegiance to his country in the most eloquent 
terms, or with the loudest voice ; but it is he who is ready to obey his 
country's laws, and respond to her call for help when she is in need. In 
willing obedience is loyalty tested. Confession remains only confession 
until it is embodied in a life of obedience. This is true in both loyalty to 
country and loyalty to Christ. The first step in the Christian life is a 
declaration of loyalty to Christ ; but the next step is that of obedience 
to Christ. 

Obedience to the commands of our Lord leads to cooperation with him 
in the execution of his plans and purposes for the world. So far as we 
can judge, the plan of Christ for the salvation of the world could not be 
accomplished except as his professed followers, in cooperating obedience, 



January, 1900 The Home Missionary 173 

execute his will and carry out his plans. Obedience and cooperation can 
hardly be separated in our conception of a loyal follower of Christ. It is 
equally evident that cooperation quickly ripens into partnership. He who 
is loyally obedient is soon conscious that he has partaken of the mind of 
Christ. The Christ-plans and the Christ-purposes for the world become 
his own plans and purposes. As his Master and Lord sacrificed himself 
that the world might be redeemed, so he, the disciple in cooperation, is 
ready to sacrifice his time, his substance, his life if need be, that the 
divine plan may be executed. By this process the disciple has become a 
partner with his Saviour in the work of saving the world. 

Thus, loyalty to Christ lifts up, exalts, sanctifies, and spiritualizes 
humanity, until it lives and acts under the impulse and inspiration of the 
Divine life as it projects itself into a world to be redeemed. The one 
universal command which Christ gave to his followers ; the one ordinance 
that he laid down to which no exception is made ; the one duty which he 
laid upon every one of his followers is, that his gospel shall be, must be, 
preached to all men. Whatever else we may question in the teachings of 
our Christian faith, there is no ambiguity or uncertainty upon this point. 
The Father's plans for the Son, and the Son's plans for the world, center 
in a universal gospel to be preached to all men. The Christian's part is 
to cooperate in that plan until the world has accepted our Christ. 

As a result of this motive accepted and put into operation, there would 
be no lack of men and women to enter every department of this work 
at home and abroad, nor of means to sustain it. Christian churches 
would spring up ; Christian schools would be multiplied ; a Christian liter- 
ature would be general on every hand, and in every language ; a new 
Christian social order would displace all that to-day is non-Christian, and 
in these and a multitude of other ways, the gospel of repentance and sal- 
vation would be preached to all men. Loyalty to Christ must mean a 
world-sacrifice for a world-salvation. If all Christians this year should 
become loyal to Jesus Christ, and in obedience enter into cooperation and 
partnership with him, there would be no question of money or means to 
carry on the work of missions at home or abroad. 



THE MASSACHUSETTS CENTENNIAL 

EXTRACT FROM THE ADDRESS OF REV. E. B. WEBB, D.D. 

On the 4th of July, 1836, two missionaries, Whitman and Spaulding, 
with their wives, on their bridal tours, were at the famous South Pass in 
the Rocky Mountains, on their way from Boston to the valley of the 



i/4 The Home Missionary January, 1900 

Columbia River. That morning, when that little company were to start, 
a sweet voice from a faint and weary lady said, " Please don't put me on 
the horse again. Leave me here and save yourselves for the great work. 
Tell mother I'm glad I came." What a beautiful spirit of sacrifice and 
resignation — leave me here to await the coming of my Father ! You go 
on and preach the gospel and possess the land. After an hour or two, 
however, she revived and renewed the journey. 

The next morning, having crossed the divide — the summit ridge which 
divides the waters of the continent — and having gone far enough to be sure 
of their position on the Pacific Slope, they stopped, and all dismounted 
for a service that ought to be perpetuated on canvas and celebrated in 
song, a service simple as the speech of a child, but sublime in history. 
They spread their blankets on the ground, raised the American flag, 
opened their Bible, and, gathering about it in a little circle, knelt in 
prayer. Then, looking west and northwest and southwest, beneath the 
Stars and Stripes unfurled, they consecrated the sunset half of the con- 
tinent to Christ and his church. A magnificent possession, better and 
richer and greater than they knew ! The completion of their journey and 
the beginning of their mission give us a brilliant chapter in American 
history. 

But the land is not yet in our possession. We must pass on to 1842, a 
period of six years, crowded with swiftly varying scenes. Dr. Whitman 
has become well acquainted with the country, and thoroughly satisfied 
that immigration must decide the rival claims of England and America. 
Called to visit a patient at Walla Walla, he remained to dine at the English 
trading post. At the dinner he learned that a colony of 140 English 
persons had already succeeded in crossing the mountains and were on 
their way down the river to join the post. This news was a present de- 
light and a brilliant prophecy for the future. Dr. Whitman, fully apprized 
for a long time of the policy which was being pushed to get possession of 
the country, instantly took it all in — the coming of this colony and the 
significance of the joy at the table. Excusing himself from further par- 
ticipation in the festivities of the occasion, he mounted his pony, and in 
two hours he had covered twenty-five miles and was at his own door. His 
responsive greeting to his wife, even before his foot had left the stirrup, 
was : " I must go to Washington ; I must see Mr. Webster and the Presi- 
dent." The reply of love and prudence was, " Go to Washington ! Why, 
husband, that is impossible." 

Suddenly called in council, the missionaries of the station came together. 
They point to the snows already whitening the mountains. They remind 
him of the lateness of the autumn and of the sufferings of even a summer 
journey across the continent. They remind him also of the terrible 
storms that must be encountered, of the blinding blizzards on the hills; of 



January, 1900 The Home Missionary 175 

the hostile Indians ; of the half-frozen and madly rushing streams that 
must be crossed ; of the short days in the dense forests ; of the long 
nights ; of the benumbing cold that must be expected, and of the thousand 
unforeseen and unsuspected perils that lie in his path. 

But nothing can shake his resolution. "I know it, brethren," he says ; 
" I know it all, but I must go. Make my outfit as light and complete as 
you can ; to-morrow evening I must start." And so with one companion, 
with an axe and a rifle, and a guide that did not know the way, Marcus 
Whitman plunged into the dark woods where not a tree had been blazed, 
across gorges filled with winter snows and icy water, over hills that the 
wolf and the bear had forsaken, through bitter cold, storms, and arctic 
desolation — on, on, for five long weary months, and for 4,000 miles of ex- 
haustive and perilous travel ! Can one mortal man endure it ? Was there 
ever such a ride ? 

Sheridan through the battle of Winchester, changing defeat into vic- 
tory ? Yes, I remember. But that was an hour sustained by military enthusi- 
asm. The charge of the Light Brigade ? Yes, that was a heroic dash. 
But it was a dash, quickly made, quickly ended. It was not five long, 
lonely, wasting, weary months. Well, Funston, swimming the river with 
a pistol in his hand and the end of a rope in his mouth ! Yes, brave boy ; 
weave the laurel for his fadeless crown. 

But Whitman; did he not ride out from the shore towards the open chan- 
nel of the river till the instinct of the horse refused to advance another step 
on the thin ice ? And then did he not compel companion and guide to 
push horse and rider together into the roaring, raging waters — a plunge, up 
out of which he came to struggle for the further shore armored in a coat 
of ice that would have chilled the bravest warrior to the heart ? 

It is often objected in books and novels that the Christian religion 
makes men weak and cowardly. Good in theory this, but false in fact. A 
thousand eyes to see the daring deed ? No. A thousand voices to cheer 
the peerless adventure ? No. In the solitude of the wilderness, under the 
gloom of the mountains, Whitman swims the icy river, fights his battles in 
the valley of death, and wins the victory — a victory which gives us 6,000 
miles of Pacific coast and one half a continent. No chivalrous man 
would pluck a leaf from the soldier's brow. But there is a courage that is 
not nourished by military glory, and a life, steady, strong, enduring, and 
achieving, hid with Christ in God. 

To the Christian religion, which inspires and sustains ministers, mis- 
sionaries, and martyrs, we owe our possession of this good land. And 
mark it well, it was the Christian religion, not any fancy substitute, or 
fashionable hybrid ; the Christian religion, experienced and avowed at 
the door of the dungeon ; purified in the fires of the stake ; tested and 
triumphant in exile — the Christian religion ! Not some earth-born specu- 



176 The Home Missionary January, i960 

lation or stoic philosophy ; not some flash of Buddhism, taken up in these 
times and mistaken for spiritual illumination ; not some doubtful utterance 
of a pagan priest — it was the Christian religion formulated in a creed and 
experienced in the heart that won for us this priceless inheritance. 



WESTERN PROSPERITY (Continued) 

COLORADO 

First. " What is the business prosperity of your State as compared 
with three years ago ? " 

I would say a decided improvement along all lines. 

One indication of prosperity is the cry " short of cars." The railroads 
are good thermometers, and they are unable to handle the freight as 
rapidly as shippers desire. New railroads are being constructed, and 
increased rather than decreased train service is the order of the day. Our 
roads are doing the largest business in the history of the State. 

The mining interests in certain sections are developing very rapidly. 
Eastern and foreign capital are seeking investment in our mining regions. 
Some marvelously rich strikes have recently been made, and our smelters 
are taxed to their utmost capacity, and are unable to meet the demands 
made upon them. 

A new industry for Colorado is just in its infancy. For the first time 
we are growing sugar beets for manufacturing purposes. One large 
factory, costing about $500,000, has been erected, and two others will 
probably be built next year. 

" Men wanted " is a universal cry. Men cannot be found to meet the 
demand. 

The coal mines of Colorado are producing more coal than ever before. 
The stone quarries are all being worked. 

New oil wells are being discovered, and a general air of prosperity is 
felt throughout the region. 

In the farming communities there is a marked showing of thrift. A 
great many large and nice houses and barns are being erected, and more 
and more the farmers are turning their attention to cattle raising, and 
Colorado is coming to the front as a cattle center. A large number of 
our farmers are getting to be "forehanded," which speaks well for the 
general prosperity of the State. 

We are just recovering from a " smelter strike," which nearly paralyzed 
the mining interests, and, to quite an extent, affected all kinds of business. 



January, 1900 The Home Missionary 177 

The amount of building in the State has probably nearly doubled dur- 
ing the past year. 

The banking business has greatly increased, and some of the savings 
banks have increased their deposits nearly 100 per cent, in three years. 

Another indication of prosperity is the marvelous growth of our Col- 
orado College. The attendance has increased about 100 per cent, in 
three years. New buildings have been erected, and $80,000 is now in 
hand for a new scientific building. 

Second: " Have Congregationalists and home missionary churches 
! shared fairly in this prosperity?" 

Yes, and no. In the farming industries would say yes, but in the 
mining interests, possibly no. 

Third. " Do you believe that proper and faithful effort can bring 
home missionary contributions during the coming year, as well as pledges 
of the churches for the support of their pastors, to a considerably higher 
figure than they have been during the past few years? " 

Yes. There is no good reason why Colorado Congregationalists 
:i should not increase their gifts. They are being educated to give, and in 
time will do their part in this great work. And yet it should be remem- 
bered that the large amount of wealth taken out of our mountains does 
•J not remain here, but goes East. While we are a wealthy State in 
fj resources, yet one must not expect too much of us at first, for one needs 
1 to be educated along lines of giving. — Supt. Horace Sanderson. 

NORTHERN CALIFORNIA 

Throughout the length and breadth of the Pacific Coast there is a 
realization that brighter days are dawning, and that the future holds in 
store a prosperity that encourages the merchant and the mechanic. Our 
crops, just harvested, have been bountiful beyond expectation. Prices 

f have advanced, and the producers of the State are liquidating indebted- 
ness. The rains needed for next year have already come in quantity 

I almost sufficient to guarantee a new crop. Working classes are more 

j generally employed than for several years past, and in many lines wages 

! have increased. The year' is far enough advanced to warrant the state- 
ment that the total transactions of the San Francisco clearing-house for 
1899 will be greatly in excess of any previous year in the city's history. 

! The banner year heretofore was 1891, when the aggregate clearings were 
$892,426,713. This year the total will reach $985, 000,000, and possibly 

1 $1,000,000,000. The present volume of San Francisco business is over 
$35,000,000 per week, while on the same basis at this time last year it was 

j $28,846,000, showing an increase of nearly twenty-five per cent, in one 

j year. 



178 The Home Missionary January, 1900 

The State Bank Commissioners report an increase of $50,000,000 in 
the bank deposits as compared with two years ago. This increase is 
about equally distributed among the commercial, national, and savings 
banks of city and county. The total deposits of all the banks of the State 
are about $25,000,000 greater than last year. The gain in the deposits in 
the savings banks is greater in proportion than in other banks, showing 
that the saving opportunities of the working people have been largely 
augmented. 

It is safe to say that our Congregational churches are sharing fairly in 
the prosperity which has already begun in the State. The missionary 
churches have had a serious time during the last three or four years. The 
appropriation for them has been reduced nearly $5,000 in that period. 
It will take a little time yet before they will get their breath back again. 
We have not gained in membership as we should. Our record shows a 
loss of sixteen from the number enrolled three years ago. This is, how- 
ever, due largely to the clearing of church rolls. .1] 

Our churches are slowly but certainly becoming stronger in spiritual 
life and in their Congregational principles. Mr. Moody, on his recent visit 
to California, said that he had a warmer reception than ever before, ancK, 
found the people more eager to hear the Gospel. 

There is also an increasing loyalty to home missionary work. In the 
minutes of our State Association, I find that in 1896 we gave $9,046 for 
Home Missions. In 1897, $10,079 ; in 1898, $13,288. We have been- 
making special efforts to establish our missionary finances on a firmer basis ; 
to have the churches face the missionary problem in a manly way ; pledge 
themselves to certain definite sums, and then deal with their pledges as 
with a business proposition. As a result of this effort we have been grow- 
ing, both in the economy of our work and the ability to raise money. It 
seems certain to your superintendent that the maintenance of our own 
missionary work is not far in the future, and that we shall also be able to 
return to the mother society generous contributions, as thank-offerings 
for her hearty support through the fifty years of California's history. — 
Supt. J. K. Harrison. 

OREGON 

Men of affairs report a large increase in business and greatly improved 
conditions as compared with three years ago. There are, as yet, few 
manufactories in this State, the possibilities along this line being practically 
undeveloped. The staple crop in the western part of the State is wheat, 
which is this year neither a large crop nor as high in price as usual. 
Added to this the lumber industry is large, and the fruit crop an impor- 
tant factor. In the eastern part of the State there are also large areas of 
wheat, and still larger interests in stock raising. As compared with three 



January, 1900 The Home Missionary 179 

years ago wheat is a little higher in price. Lumber has advanced some- 
what, and the demand has increased very greatly, so that a large number 
of mills that have been idle for years are now humming with activity. 
The fruit crop is the nearest to a failure that the State has ever known. 
A brisk demand for wool has sent up the price of sheep, and sheep men 
are prosperous and happy. Cattle men also share in the same prosperity. 
Among the classes now on the crest of the wave of a great financial move- 
ment are the stock men, the larger class of farmers, manufacturers, lum- 
bermen, jobbers, transportation companies, owners of mines, and similar 
industries. Associated with them are their various employees, who share 
with them in the new conditions. Work of every sort is more plentiful, 
almost any man or woman who is able-bodied and reasonably efficient 
being now able to get work at reasonable wages. Then, too, the mills and 
factories that three years ago only worked, when at all, on short time, now 
run full hours. 

It is fair to presume also that the members of churches who follow the 
Pilgrim way have shared proportionately in the new prosperity. Not to 
believe this would be either an acknowledgment that they are less enter- 
prising and progressive, or that there was something in the conditions of 
the new life that would not admit of participation by the membership of a 
denomination which stands for a high ideal in Christian character. 

As to what these churches will be able and willing to do toward benev- 
olence is not so easy to determine. There is no question whatever but 
that they will make far greater effort toward self-support. Nearly all of 
them look toward that as a great desideratum. Whether they will go on 
from that and largely increase their contributions toward the benevolent 
work of the denomination remains to be seen. The larger part of our 
contributions come from small gifts, and these represent a commendable 
sacrifice on the part of many humble givers. The richer class never have, 
and perhaps never will, give proportionately. It is the richer class who 
have first felt the improved conditions. Others are sharing with them in 
the present blessing, but by no means proportionately. Clerks, railroad 
employees, mill hands, laboring men, teachers, ministers, and salaried 
men of every description, can more easily secure work; but wages are by 
no means advanced to correspond v/ith the advanced rate of the cost of 
living. It is from these poorer people that we look for the great bulk 
of our gifts for benevolence, and for the means of carrying on the great 
work of the church at home. 

No doubt the new conditions will add very materially to the contribu- 
tions for the Home Missionary Society, as well as to other benevolences; 
but whether they will reach our anticipations or not remains to be deter- 
mined. It is not easy to forecast the future in this regard. Many muni- 
ficent givers were overtaken in the commercial typhoon of '94, and went 



180 The Home Missionary January, 1900 

down with their argosies. These were large-hearted, clear-headed, public- 
spirited, valuable citizens of the Commonwealth, and faithful, efficient 
workers in their churches. But, on the other hand, it is quite possible that 
men who had no interest in either home churches or benevolences, and 
who sought personal advancement rather than public good, have escaped 
the cataclysm in greater numbers than the liberal supporters of missions. 
One dislikes to think this, still more to confess it, and yet in all probability, 
when the adventurous fleet has all arrived in port, it will be found that 
more ships outrode the storm which were owned by Shylock, Dives & Co. 
than by Lazarus & Paul. If this is so it may have some bearing on the 
question of immediate gains to the treasury and proportionate advance- 
ment in religious and material things. — Sitpt. C. F. Clapp. 

WASHINGTON 

Answering your questions as to present prosperity in this State I 
quote: The cashier of a Seattle bank says, "Our deposits to-day are 
nearly six times as large as in the latter part of '96, and our daily trans- 
actions aggregate nearly five times as much. Our merchants are appar- 
ently all making money, and are carrying comfortable balances instead of 
being steady borrowers, as was the case to a considerable extent three 
years ago." 

From Spokane comes this information : " In the last three years a greater 
prosperity has returned to Spokane than ever before was known. The 
people of Spokane have made millions from the mines surrounding it in 
British Columbia and elsewhere, and are investing them in Spokane real 
estate, business blocks, residences, manufacturing, and in business chan- 
nels. The entire eastern part of the State also is prosperous, farmers 
having wholly recovered from their financial distress. Three years ago 
last September the banks of Spokane held deposits amounting to 
$1,800,000 ; last September they held $6,000,000. September, '96, bank 
clearings were $1,860,164 ; September, '99, they were $5,960,000." 

Speaking cautiously, one says, " Some have retrieved their fortunes ; 
others are merely relieved from agonizing financial embarrassments, and 
some put in the way of future prosperity. To a large number within the 
circle of my acquaintance prosperity has been no more than a develop- 
ment from pauperism to a condition of comfortable self-support." 

A well-informed minister, who knows the churches that give and those 
that receive missionary money, speaking of both, says, "As to prosperity 
there can be no doubt ; and that our churches have shared in it cannot be 
doubted. But two or three things are to be considered : (1) Debts, the 
liquidation of which delays ability to increase benevolences. (2) People 
take time to be sure of continued prosperity. (3) The prevailing religious 






January, 1900 The Home Missionary 181 

indifference is very great, and this affects benevolences as well as growth 
in numbers." 

A lawyer who was once a member of the legislature, speaking from 
the standpoint of a politician, assumes prosperity as unquestioned, and 
says, " Congregationalists and home missionary churches ought to be 
sharing in this general prosperity." He adds the hope that the mistake 
will not be made of embarrassing churches which ought to be sustained, 
by withholding aid "on account of the times." 

But you wish my candid opinion on the points suggested. Most cer- 
tainly there can be no doubt as to the present prosperity in this State. 
Not Seattle and Spokane alone are prosperous, but Tacoma, Walla Walla, 
North Yakima, Colfax, Whatcom, and a score of other towns make an 
equally favorable showing. Congregational churches have shared in this 
prosperity, though prosperity generally moves more slowly in churches 
than elsewhere. In '95 the average missionary salary in the larger mis- 
sionary churches was $624, of which the average pledge of the church 
was $290. In '96, salary, $653; church pledges, $337. In '97, salary, $630 ; 
church pledges, $334. In '98, salary, $636 ; church pledges, $348. In 
'99, salary, $650 ; church pledges, $400. I have not at hand the total 
contributions to the Congregational Home Missionary Society ; but I 
know that while a few years ago the offerings were generally merely 
nominal, they are now such as to indicate an intelligent purpose on 
the part of Congregationalists to provide for steadily increasing church 
incomes and missionary contributions. 

As an appropriate suggestion along this line I endorse the article of 
Dr. Stimson in the Congregationalist of November 2d, especially the sen- 
tence, " It is the day of rich men." This is as true in Washington as in 
Massachusetts or New York. The great prosperity benefits greatly the few, 
accompanied by a more general prosperity of lesser degree for the masses. 

If the self-supporting churches were out of debt they could increase 
their missionary contributions to a considerable extent. If the stronger 
missionary churches were paying their pastors living salaries, an increase 
of their pledges for the support of their pastors would relieve the Con- 
gregational Home Missionary Society to the full amount of such increase. 
But prosperity brings a greater increase of responsibility than of income 
to most of the churches. The churches are prosperous, but not indepen- 
dent. The cost of their support — not for luxuries, but for life — increases 
faster than their ability to pay. New work made imperative by prosperity 
increases faster than the ability of the churches in the State to care for 
it. But prosperity increases the courage of the people, and their ambition 
to make the churches self-supporting. And with all of the difficulties with 
which they must contend, they will not at home plead poverty and abroad 
boast of prosperity. They recognize the reasonableness of an appeal to 



1 82 The Home Missionary January, 1900 

their prosperity for an advance toward self-support and an increase of 
missionary contributions. I believe that in response to faithful and sym- 
pathetic efforts there will be generous and gratifying results — amounts in 
money reaching "to a considerably higher figure than they have been 
during the past few years." 

"OUR SPANISH NEIGHBOR" 

[New York, Brooklyn, Tampa, Cuba, and New Mexico are to-day furnishing the 
material of our own Spanish-speaking missionary work. An interdenominational work is 
also being done in Southern California, supported chiefly by Congregational churches. 
The following is taken from the Spanish Evangelist, published in Santa Ana. — Ed.] 

" The Spanish-speaking population of California cannot be less than 
40,000 ; accurate figures are not available. A half century ago this sunny 
land was entirely in the possession of our Mexican neighbors. Comfort 
and plenty, if not great riches, marked their temporal condition. They 
were enjoying undisturbed their own land, laws, and customs. Thousands 
of California Mexicans still live whose memory of the old days is distinct. 
Clearly do they recall the time when Americans, of whom occasional ad- 
venturers appeared, were in every sense foreigners. These ancient pos- 
sessors of the soil have seen the Protestant English-speaking race come in 
upon them in wave after wave of immigration until they themselves have 
been well-nigh submerged by the flood. To-day we call them foreigners, 
and in speaking of efforts for their welfare put it under the head, ' Foreign 
Work at Home.' 

" The temporal condition of this people demands our earnest sympathy. 
Their possessions have largely passed into our hands, and, with few excep- 
tions, they are reduced to circumstances of poverty or even distress. They 
have the feeling, all too justly grounded, that they are considered as of 
but little importance by Americans. Although saying little, their natu- 
ral pride resents this. They therefore ask few favors of those above 
them, but cling closer one to another and to their own language and cus- 
toms. Not infrequently in visiting their humble homes, have I encoun- 
tered cases of protracted illness, accompanied by extreme want. Mexican 
neighbors were assisting, and sharing their scantv provisions, while well- 
to-do American neighbors, who doubtless gladly would have helped, neither 
asked nor received information. Poverty is among the least of their afflic- 
tions. Ignorance, immorality, jealousies, drunkenness, and quarrels with 
frequent fatal results, are shockingly common in some places. They 
themselves are aware of it and lament it. But what have been their oppor- 
tunities? " 



January, 1 900 



The Home Missionary 



183 



APPOINTMENTS 



SEPTEMBER, 1899 



Not in commission last year 

Alcom, W. A., Strang, Shickley and Bruning, Neb. 
Doe, Franklin B., Cumberland, No. Wis. 
Ellis, Emery W., Thedford, Neb. 
Elwood, William, Chamberlain, So. Dak. 
Harris, Ransom C., Dadeville, Ala. 
Heglim, Samuel S., Aurora, So. Dak. 
Henkelmann, Gustave, Timber Creek and Wol- 

back, Neb. 
Luce, I. J., Ocean View and Cooper, No. Cal. 
Miller, Charles I., Sykeston, No. Dak. 
Oldtield, W. J., Estellme, So. Dak. 
Richert, Cornelius, Germantown and Oak Grove, 

Neb. 
Spillers, Ashbel P., Tye-Tye, Ga. 
Strawman, David S., Michigan City, No. Dak. 
Treiber, Daniel J., Collyer, Buffalo Park, Wallace, 

and Macon, Kan. 

Re- commissioned 

Adams, James R., Sheridan, Wyo. 

Alderson, John, Winfred and Freedom, So. Dak. 

Baker, George, Washougal and Mt. Pleasant, 

Wash. 
Ball, Joseph W., Minnehaha, Okla. 
Biggers, Lorenzo J., Perote, Ala. 
Brakemeyer, Gus L., Friend and Turkey Creek, 

Neb. 
Brink, Lee A., Iron River, No. Wis. 
Brue, James, Walnut Lane and Longstraw, La. 
Camfield, Lewis E., Academy, So. Dak. 
Carlson, Walter G., Willow Lakes, So. Dak. 
Crater, George W., Meckling, So. Dak. 
Dahlgren, John A., Dover, N. J. 
Davies, William, Spokane, Wash. 



De Groff, Charles F., Letcher, So. Dak. 

Dick, Jeremiah M., Hubbard, Ore. 

Evans, William L., Plymouth, Penn. 

Fleming, Moses G., Amandaville, Ga. 

Garvin, Hugh C, Ridgeville, Ind. 

Gibson, John, Washburn, No. Wis. 

Gray, Samuel H., Kelso, No. Dak. 

Grinnell, Eugene I., Oacoma, So. Dak. 

Grupe, Fred W., Farnam, Neb. 

Hall, Ransom B., Gettysburg, So. Dak-. 

Halsall, Evan, Manville, Wyo. • 

Harper, Thomas H., Oklahoma City, Okla. 

Harris, Robert N., Mt. Carmel, Penn. 

Hill, Thomas H., Aurora, So. Dak. 

Huntley, S. F., Wessington Springs, So. Dak. 

Jefferies, John, Norfolk, Neb. 

Jenney, E. W., Howard, Vilas, Lake Henry and 

Drakola, So. Dak. 
Koch, Johannes, Ritzville, Wash. 
Lewis, Thomas G., Seattle, Wash. 
Lyman, Henrietta C., Ft. Pierre, So. Dak. 
MacNeill, Samuel H., Tomahawk, Wis. 
Martin, Edwin, Iroquois, So. Dak. 
Mitchell, F. G., Netawaka, Kan. 
Parks, William U., Clark, So. Dak. 
Perks, Harry, Alturas, No. Cal. 
Philbrook, Charles E., St. Helens, Ore. 
Rood, John, Sandstone, Minn. 
Saunders, Harry L., Wellston, Okla. 
Schaerer, John, Curtiss, Wis. 
Schwabenland, John C Glen Ullin, No. Dak. 
Taggart, Charles E., Elk Point, So. Dak. 
Thomas, David L., Wheatland, Wyo. 
Watt, T. Edgar, Longton, Kan. 
Whitby, Henry J., Emporia, Kan. 
Winter, Paul, South Shore, So. Dak. 
Young, Joseph C, Port Townsend, Wash. 



OCTOBER, 1899 



Not in commission last year 

Ander, E. G., Perth Amboy, N. J. 

Baumann, Henry, Bowdle, Israel, Blumenthal, 

and Grosz Station, So. Dak. 
Blanchard, Frances G., Helena, Mont. 
Cole, H. H., Douglas, Alaska. 
Cram, Elmer E., Grey Eagle, Minn. 
Elwood, William, Chamberlain, So. Dak. 
Goshen, Elmer I., Ogden, Utah. 
Hotze, William H., Brule and Hoffmans, Neb. 
Knight, Plutarch S., Corvallis, Ore. 
Read, Elmer D., Douglas, Kan. 
Rogers, Clarence J., Plankinton, So. Dak. 
Ruring, Victor H., Rock Springs and Green 

River, Wyo. 
Singleton, J. H., Hayden, Colo. 
Tre Fethren, Eugene B., Ipswich, So. Dak. 
Warner, Alexander C., Coalville and Echo, Utah. 
Wickwire, George A., Aitkin, Minn. 
Yarrow, Philip W, Fosston, Minn. 

Re-co?n m issioned 

Anderson, Charles, Bloomfield. Neb. 
Anderson. Harold E., Strong City, Kan. 
Bassett, F. H., Walker, Minn. 



Beadenkoff, Thomas M., Canton, Md. 

Blomquist, Charles F., Bagley, Minn. 

Burden, Thomas J., Five Forks, Ga. 

Chew, James, Billings, Nichols, and Riverdale, 
Mo. 

Conry, Henry W., Pond Creek, Okla. 

Fowler, William C., Genesee, Idaho, and Union- 
town, Wash. 

Griffith, William, Williston, No. Dak. 

Hall, Ransom B., Gettysburg, So. Dak. 

Harwell, J. H., Siloam Springs, Ark. 

Heathcote, Arthur S., Springfield, Minn. 

Horner, John W., Aberdeen, So. Dak. 

Krause, Frederick C, Fitchburg, No. Cal. 

Lee, Phineas B., Seabrook nd Pauline, Kan. 

Lien, Peter, Fessenden, No. Dak. 

Logan, Benjamin F., Amity, Mo. 

Newman, George H., Ritzville, Wash. 

Pinney, Ira E., West Dora, Minn. 

Richardson, Charles A., Oneida, Kan. 

Rogers, Enoch E., Lamberton, Minn. 

Sage, Charles J., Ravenna, Neb. 

Shockley, Albert D., Hetland and Badger, So. 
Dak. 

Smith, Mrs. Esther, Sebeka, Minn. 

Turner, B. F., Morrison, Okla. 

Whitmore, Orin B., Kirkland, Wash. 

Yarrow, Sidney R., Mill Valley, No. Cal. 



1 84 



The Home Missionary 



January, 1900 



NOVEMBER, 1899 



Not in commission last year 

Chase, S. A., Walker, Minn. 

Cox, E. H., Swanville, Minn. 

Cutler, Alexander E., Lake Nebagemain, Wis. 

Griffiths, Fred W., Jennings, Okla. 

Merrill, Charles W., Whittier, So. Cal. 

Parker, L. J., General Missionary in Okla. 

Peterson, C. E., Lincoln, Neb. 

Pinkerton, Henry M., Carthage, So. Dak. 

Slater, Sheldon, Hesper, No. Dak. 

Stewart, J. B., General Missionary in So. Ga. 

Young, A. H., Drummond and Mason, Wis. 



Re-com m issio ned 

Bostwick, Elmer D., Sheridan, Wyo., and Big 

Timber, Mont. 
Carlson, Walter G., Newkirk, Okla. 
Cleveland, Henry C, Hyannis, Neb. 
Conard, W. J., Park Rapids, Akeley, and Dorset, 

Minn. 
Cone, James W., Powhattan, Kan. 
Dexter, Granville M., Little Shasta, No. Cal. 
Emerson, Fred C, Glen Ullin, No. Dak. 
Fellows, C. B., General Missionary in Minn. 
Field, James P., Chillicothe, Mo. 
Fisk, Pliny H., Edgerton, Minn. 
Fisk, Wilbur, Freeborn, Minn. 
Gearhart, Charles D., Pierce, Neb. 



Gordon, John, Marion, Ind. 

Gray, John. Butte, Neb. 

Hartley, John, Alva and Tecumseh, Okla. 

Henry, Miss Emma K., Garretson, So. Dak. 

Henshaw, Theodore D., Blossburg, Penn. 

Hershner, John L., Hood River, Ore. 

Hess, Henrv, Emmans and Hoffnung, Neb. 

Hill, T. H.,' Howard, So. Dak. 

Jenkins, David T., Crary, No. Dak. 

Jenney, E. W., McCook, Civil Bend, and mis- 
sionary work in So. Dak. 

Jones, John E., Dawson, No. Dak. 

Knapp, George W., Ogalalla, Neb. 

Lewis, F. F., Holdredge, Neb. 

Long, Henry B., Indianapolis. Ind. 

Mair, William M., Garretson. So. Dak. 

Moore, William N., Great Falls, Mont. 

O'Brien, James P., Plymouth, Genesee, and Penn 
Valley, Miss., and Kansas City, Mo. 

Radford, Walter, Waubay, So. Dak. 

Roberts, John, Petersburg. Neb. 

Ruddock, Charles A., Walker, Minn. 

Ruddock, Edward N., Randall. Minn. 

Sheldon, Charles F., Enid, Okla. 

Simpkin, Peter A., Gallup, New Mex. 

Thomas, Isaac, Horatio and Lindsay, Penn. 

Thompson, Thomas, Revillo and Elmira, So. 
Dak. 

Walters, Thomas W., General Missionary in 
Wash. 

Wieder, Franklin E., Philadelphia, Penn. 

Wright, A. C, El Paso, Texas. 



RECEIPTS 



For account of receipts by State Auxiliary Societies, see pages 199 to 203 
SEPTEMBER, 1899 



MAINE— $23.00. 

Bridgeton, First, by E. L. Lewis. 
Calais, First, by A. L. Clapp. ... 



NEW HAMPSHIRE — $194.03; of 
which legacy, $85.28. 

F. C. I. and H. M. Union of N. H., 
Miss A. A. McFarland, Treas 

Auburn, by Rev. A. E. Hall 

Exeter, Estate of Mrs A. W. Chad- 
wick, by F. H. Wiggin 

Hinsdale, Jr. C. E. Soc. by E. F. Well- 
man, for Salary Fund 

Mason, by C. H. Wheeler 

Orfordville, Y. P. S. C. E., by Mrs. 
F. E. Washburn, for Alaska 



VERMONT-$86.2i. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Vt., Mrs. R. 
McKinnon. Treas. : 
Randolph Centre, Y. P. S. C. E . . . . 

Rochester. Y. P. S. C. E 

West Brattleboro, Y. P. S. C. E. . . . 
West Charleston 



82 


00 


8 


CO 


85 


28 


8 
6 


13 
52 



10 00 
2 55 



Bennington Centre. Mrs. M.W. Hicks. 

Burlington, Mrs. W. J. Van Patten.. 

Lunenburg, by Rev. E. F. Blackmer. 

Swanton, Mrs. A. M. Allen, to const, 
herself a L. M., by Mrs. E. J. Rans- 
low 

Townshend, by Rev. M. F. Hardy... 



MASSACHUSETTS — $5,422.19 ; of 
which legacies, $4,630.70. 

Mass. Home Miss. Soc, by Rev. E. B. 
Palmer, Treas. : 

For Western foreign work 

By request of donors 



Woman's H. M. A., Miss L. D. White, 
Treas. : 
For Salar) Fund 

Belmont, Waverly Estate of Mrs. J. 
D Butler amount realized from a 
beques* f $ IOO by Mrs J. D. B. 
Chaney, Ex'x 

Boston W A.Wilde for Salary Fund. 

Ludlow Center First, by H. E. Miller. 

Needhair S.S by Mrs B.W.Rideout. 



30 70 
25 00 
12 00 
6 56 



January, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



185 



Northampton, Dorcas Soc. of the First, 
by Mrs. J. E. Clarke, for Salary 
Fund -. 

Palmer, Estate of Mrs. M. K. Mer- 
rick, by H. F. Billings 

Pittsfield, South, by R. H. Barrett... 

Sandwich, Y. P. S. C. E., by Mrs. E. 
S. Taft, for Alaska 

Sheffield, by A. T. Wakefield 

Springfield, South Ch., by W. H. Mul- 

lins 

S. C. Bu^nham 

West Springfield, First, by A. H. 
Smith 

Woods Holl, First, by Mrs. J. W. 
Bowles 

Worcester, Estate of Albert Curtis, by 
Col. E. B. Stoddard, Ex 



RHODE ISLAND-fio.oo. 

Providence, Mrs. Mounce. $5 : Mrs. 
Leavitt, $5, by Rev. A. De Barritt, 
for Cuba 



$56 25 



122 
5 



CONNECTICUT- 
legacy, $532.78. 



,013.37, OI which 



Thomaston, Estate of Mabel Free- 
man $53278 

West Avon, by J. A. Hawley, for Sal- 
ary Fund 15 00 



NEW YORK— $237.78, of which legacy, 

$9-39- 

Angola, A. H. Ames 5 00 

Brooklyn, Bushwick Avenue, byT. A. 

Cotton 7 33 

Bushwick Avenue S. S., by Rev. C. 

W.King 810 

Cortland, First, by A. M. Waterbury. 120 00 
Deer River, Y. P. S. C. E., by Mrs. C. 

E. Dimaway 1 08 

East Rockaway, Bethany, by D. Storm 10 00 

Eldred, A Friend 2 00 

Haviland Hollow, King's Daughters, 

$5 ; M. E. Ch., $8.50, by Rev. W. 

Tunnicliffe, through Rev. E. P. Her- 

rick, for Cuba 13 50 

Jamesport, by C. S. Tuthill 7 10 

Mt. Sinai, by S. J. Hopkins 11 10 

Orient Point. Life Member 1000 

Sayville, by W. Green 33 18 

Willsboro, Estate of S. A. Stower, by 

A. J. B. Ross 9 39 



Miss. Soc. of Conn., by D. N. Camp, 
Sec .-. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Conn., Mrs. 
W. W. Jacobs, Treas. : 
Salary Fund : 
Berlin, L. B. Soc, by Miss F. C. 

Robbins 

Bridgeport, First, L. B. O., by 

Miss C. Smith 

Ellsworth, Aux., by Miss Esther 

C. Dunbar 

So. Canaan, Aux., by Mrs. E. E. 

Manley 



611 28 NEW JERSEY— $31.17. 

Dover, Swedish Ch., by Rev. J. A. 

Dahlgren 2 50 

Guttenberg, Y. P. S. C. E., by Rev. 

A. De Barritt, for Cuba 16 35 

Woodbridge, First, by W.H.Voorhees 12 32 



2 


62 


10 


00 


8 


40 


2 


50 



23 52 



Boardman, S. S., by Rev. E. P. Her- 

rick, for Cuba n 08 

Bozrah, by C. J. Abell 11 00 

Bristol, First, by L- G. Merrick 50 00 

S. S. of the First, by Miss J. E. 

Beckwith .... 5 29 

Brookfield Center, Y. P. S. C. E., by 

Mrs. C. W. Francis, for Alaska 5 00 

Collinsville, by J. S. Heath 3000 

Coventry, First, by J. S. Morgan 48 79 

East Hartford, First, by E. C. Geer.. 30 92 

East Haven, by Mrs. W. S. Coker... 24 00 

Enfield, Cong. Ch., gift of Julia Lusk. 250 00 

Farmington, First, by H. D. Hawley. 100 00 

Granby, South Ch., by C. P. Loomis. 15 00 
Greenwich, Stillson Benev. Soc. of 

the Second, by C. M. Mead, to const. 

B. Wright, C. N. Mead, Mrs. H. B. 

Stevens, Mrs. E. Brush, Mrs. J. 

Brush, and Mrs. G. M. Silleck L.Ms. 487 00 
Hartford, Warburton Chapel, by Miss 

E. E. Mix 22 19 

S. S. of the Center, by K. Smith ... 20 00 

G. G. Williams 500 00 

Harwinton, by A. G. Wilson 18 96 

Mansfield. Second, by B. F. Koons... 15 35 

Milford, First, by F. J. Bosworth 10 50 

Old Lyme, First, by W. F. Coult 48 26 

Orange, by S. D. Woodruff 22 04 

Putnam, Second, by E. M. Corbin... 59 16 
Sherman, by Rev. E. P. Herrick, for 

Cuba 500 

Southington, First, by R. G. Andrew, 

for Salary Fund 3125 

Stonington, " Thanksgivings " 10 00 



PE NNS YLVANI A-$34.s 4 . 

Horatio, $1.75; Lindsey, $2.33, by 
Rev. I. Thomas 

Lansford, Welsh, by Rev. F. T. Evans 

Mt. Carmel, First, by Rev. R. N. Har- 
ris 

Philadelphia, Kensington Ch.,by Rev. 

N.N. Bormose 

A. L. Goddard, for Cuba 



4 08 
7 00 

10 46 

10 00 
3 00 



MARYLAND— $5,001.00 ; of which 
legacy, $4,995.00. 

Baltimore, Estate of Mrs. M. R. Haw- 
ley 4-995 00 

Frostburg, by Rev. G. W. Moore 6 00 



VIRGINIA— $5.40. 
Herndon, by E. L. Roby. 



NORTH CAROLINA-$2.t 5 . 

Hayward, Liberty, by Rev. J. E. 

McNeill 

Tryon, In Memoriam, R. L. G., by 

Rev. A. Winter 



1 iS 
1 00 



GEORGIA— $18.80. 

Demorest, Ladies Benev. Soc, by Miss 

O. M. Van Hise 12 00 

Union Ch., by Rev. W. O. Phillips. 4 50 

Hoschton, by Rev. W. Shaw 2 30 



i86 



The Home Missionary 



January, 1900 



ALABAMA— $1.40. 

Opelika. Mt. Jefferson Ch., by Rev. 
L. J. Biggers 



IOWA— $2.00. 

Lansing Ridge. German Ch., by Rev. 
A.Kern 



1 40 
6 25 



7 20 
1 03 



8 23 
5 5o 



LOUISIANA-$ 9 . 74 . 

Hammond. Ch.. $7.63 ; S. S., $2.11. by 
J. Q. Adams 



FLORIDA— $7.65. 

Crestview. Holley, and Laurel Hill, by 
Rev. D. A. Simmons 

Tavares, Union Ch., by Rev. L. J. 
Donaldson 



TEXAS~$i 3 . 73 . 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. A. Geen, 
Treas.: 

Dallas, First, Rally 

S. S. of So. Park. Rally 



Denison, First, by Rev. G. P. Hauser. 



OKLAHOMA— $8.00. 

Alva, by Rev. J. Hartley 

Pond Creek, Union Ch., by Rev. H. 
W. Conry, D. D 



NEW MEXICO— $5.50. 
Gallup, First, by Rev. P. A. Simpkin. 



OHIO— $2,480.70 ; of which legacy, 
$2,400.00. 

Akron, West Ch., by J. E. Patterson. . 77 50 
Atwater, Estate of Fanny B. Cumine, 

by Jared Stratton, Ex 2,400 00 

Rochester, by S. Landis 3 20 



INDIANA- 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. A. D. 
Davis, Treas. : 
Indianapolis, Fellowship Ch 

Hammond, by Rev. E. D. Curtis 



4 5° 
3 5° 



ILLINOIS-$2.oo. 

Oneida. Y. P. S. C. E., by F. Shaw, 
for Alaska. . 



MISSOURI-$2o. 3 8. 

Hamilton, First, by Rev. E. H.Price. 
Kansas City, Ivanhoe Park Ch., by 

Rev. L. Warren 

St. Louis. Hope Ch., $3.53; S. S., $7.85, 

by J. M. Campbell 



WISCONSIN-$ 2 .oo. 
Clear Lake, Swedish, by H. W. Carter. 



4 00 
11 38 



MINNESOTA-$94 5 .8i, of which leg- 
acy, $50.00. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. M. W. 

Skinner, Treas 

Anoka, C. E. , for Alaska 

Barnesville, Young Ladies 

Cambria 

Cottage Grove 

Cream 

Crookston 

Dawson 

Duluth, Plymouth 

Pilgrim 

C. E. Soc. for Alaska 

Faribault 

Fairmont 

Fraser 

Freeborn 

Glencoe 

Glenwood 

Grand Meadow 

Hutchinson 

Kerns 

Lake Belt Ch. and S. S 

Lake City 

Mantorville 

Mankato 

Mapleton 

Marshall 

Morris 

Minneapolis, Plymouth 

Lyndale 

Lowry Hill 

First 

Pilgrim 

Forest Heights 

Open Door 

S.S 

Bethany 

C. E. for Alaska 

Park 

Fremont Avenue 

Como Avenue 

38th Street 

Lora Hollister 

A Friend 

Northfield, to const. Mrs. M. B. 
Wilcox a L. M . 

S. S., for work in Cuba 

Ortonville 

Owatonna 

Paynesville 

Pelican Rapids 

Plainview 

Princeton 

Sherburn 

Sleepy E ye 

Springfield 

Sauk Center 

St. Anthony Park 

St. Paul, Olivet 

University Avenue 

Tatum, C. E. Soc 

Pacific 

Park 

St. Louis Park — 

Stewart 

Stewart ville 

Wabasha 

Waseca 

C. E. Soc 

S. S 

Welch, S. S 

Winona, First 

Second 

Scandinavian 



20 00 

10 00 

5 00 

2 00 

5 00 

2 00 

TO OO 

8 00 

5 °° 

22 00 

5 00 

72 QO 

6 00 

1 50 
8 00 
6 00 

10 00 

4 5° 
15 00 

3 °° 

2 00 

5 °° 



41 04 

14 48 
20 00 

15 co 
35 °° 
15 00 
48 CO 

8 00 

15 00 
2 00 

2 00 
5 00 

16 50 

10 00 
30 00 

5 o° 
5 00 

3 °° 

50 00 

11 99 

2 00 
13 5° 

3 00 
19 85 

8 00 
S °o 

3 °° 

5 °° 

6 co 
10 co 
15 co 

13 00 
1 25 
t 25 
g 00 

14 35 

4 80 
6 25 
1 00 
3 00 

10 49 

1 5' 

2 90 

74 5° 
10 co 

3 °° 



January, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



187 



Waterville $3 00 

Worthington 10 00 

Zumbrota 15 °° 

878 36 

Less expenses 725 

871 11 
Austin, S. S. of the First, by L. E. 

Wakefield 385 

Brainerd, Second, by Rev. H. B. Bor- 

tel 2 85 

Hancock, by Rev. G. R. Searles 5 00 

Madison, by Rev. J. L. Jones 10 00 

Winona, Estate of G. F. Hubbard — 50 00 

Second, by Rev. W. F. Trussell 3 00 

KANSAS— $120.58. 

Received by Rev. A. C. Hogbin, 
Treas. : 

Council Grove 16 04 

Received by Rev. L. P. Broad : 

Collyer 1 54 

Diamond Springs 400 

Dover 300 

Kanwaka 1500 

Mound City S 00 

Muscotah, Y. P. S C. E 500 

North Topeka. S. S 450 

38 04 
Woman's H. M. Union, Miss M. E. 

Wilkinson, Treas 1 50 

Hiawatha, by Rev. L. P. Broad 60 00 

Valencia and Plymouth Rock, Rev. 

C. E. Roberts 5 00 

NEBRASKA— $42.47. 

Crete, German Ch., by Rev. F. Eger- 

land 10 00 

Danbury, First, by Rev. E. C. Hayes 1 17 
Friend and Turkey Creek, German 

Ch's, by Rev. G. L. Brakemeyer 4 00 

Holdrege, First, by Rev. F. F. Lewis 95 
Lincoln, German, by Rev. E. C. 

Osthoff 5 00 

Long Pine, First, by Rev. E. Booth, 

Jr 1000 

Springview, by Rev. J M. Kokjer 8 69 

Trenton, by Rev. F. Peacock 2 66 

NORTH DAKOTA— $14.00. 

Amenia, W. C. T. U., by Rev. E. H. 

Stickney 10 00 

• Crary, Mrs. J. H. Smith 2 00 

Forman, by Rev. J. T. Killen 2 00 

SOUTH DAKOTA— $4.3.59. 

Received by Rev. W. H. Thrall : 

Huron, Rev. W. H. Thrall, 15 00 

Lake Henry 2 75 

Yankton, E. C. Dudley 50 

18 25 

Alcester, by R. B. Harding 7 co 

Elk Point, by Rev. C. E. Taggart.,.. 6 16 

Perkins, by Miss E. K. Henry 2 03 

Revillo and Elmira, by Rev. T. 

Thompson 10 15 



COLORADO- $14.00. 

Buena Vista, First, by Rev. R. B. 

Larkin 

Flagler, First, by Rev. C. W. Smith.. 



jiio 00 
4 00 



WYOMING-$ 5 2.66. 

Woman's Missionary Union, Mrs. A. 
E. Kevan, Treas.: 
Cheyenne, First 26 00 

Cheyenne, S. S. of the First, by A. 

Underwood 25 00 

Sheridan, Rev. J. R. Adams 1 66 

MONTANA— $15.00. 

Woman's Missionary Union, Mrs. W. 
S. Bell, Treas. : 

Big Timber, Homeland Circle 7 00 

Plains . 3 00 

10 00 
Big Timber, by Rev. E. D. Bostwick. 5 00 



IDAHO-$i5. 9 2. 

Woman's Missionary Union, Mrs. L. 
H. Johnston, Treas. : 

Boise, Aux 12 92 

Mountainhome, Aux 300 

iS 9 2 
CALIFORNIA-$ 25 .io. 

Byron, by Rev. D. Goodsell 2 50 

Chula Vista, S. S. of the First, by A. 

M. Perry 13 45 

Decoto, First, by Rev. E. D. Hale 4 15 

Ventura, by Miss E. C. Cook 4 00 

Addl., by Rev. J. T. Ford 1 00 

WASHINGTON-$ 45 .5o. 

Eagle Harbor, by Rev. J. Bushell 9 50 

Edmonds, First, by Rev. W. A. 
Arnold 500 

Genesee, Ida.,andUniontown,by Rev. 
W. C. Fowler 6 00 

Kirkland, First, by Rev. O. B. Whit- 
more 1 5 00 

Long Beach, Union Ch., by Rev. H. 
W. Mercer 2 00 

Spanaway, by Rev. H. Gregory 3 00 

Tacoma, East Ch., by Rev. W. G. 

Olinger .• 5 00 

September Receipts : Contributions . . $5,272 22 

Legacies 12,703 15 

Interest : . . 715 58 

Home Mission- 
ary 8 50 

$18,699 45 



i88 



The Home Missionary 



January, 1900 



OCTOBER, 1899 



MAINE-S38.S0. 

Biddeford, Second, by E. H. Gold- 

thwaite 

Eastport, Central Ch., by H. Kilby... 



NEW HAMPSHIRE-$ 4 8. 9 i. 

Bennington, by R. Knowles 

East Jaffrey. by B. E. Marfn 

Keene, S. Rising 

Lebanon, First, by J. L. Spring. 
Plainfield, Mrs. S. R. Baker... . 



VERMONT-$io 5 .io. 

Vermont Domestic Miss. Soc, by W. 
C. Tyler, Treas 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. M. R. 
MacKinnon, Treas.: 
For Salary Fund : 

Barton 

Manchester 

Randolph Centre Homeland Circle 
St. Albans, Y. P. S. C. E 



$27 45 
11 05 



5 82 
" 75 

5 00 
2 1 34 

5 °° 



15 00 
25 00 

15 GO 
IO OO 



Putney, Mrs. A . S. Taf t. for Cuba .... 

Windsor, Old South Ch., by R. B. 

Barton 



65 00 



6 00 



MASSACHUSETTS — $8,378.25 ; of 
which legacies, $6,200.81. 

Mass. Home Miss. Soc, by Rev. E. B. 
Palmer, Treas.: 
By request of donors 352 96 

Woman's H. M. Assoc, Miss L. D. 
White, Treas. : 

For Salary Fund 1,300 00 

Haverhill, Harriet Newall Mission 
Circle, for Cuba 3 00 

Andover, Estate of Edward Taylor, 

by O. B. Taylor, Ex., $100. 

Ashland, First, by E. Perry 9 00 

Boston, Estate of William Hilton, by 
H. G. Nichols and C. K. Cobb, 
Trustees 5,053 67 

W. A. Wilde, for Salary Fund 25 co 

Chester, Ladies' Miss. Circle, by Mrs. 

T. D. Murphy 11 38 

Curtisville, A Friend 10 00 

Dorchester, Second, by E. Tolman... 148 50 
Fairhaven, First, J. F. Damon Fund, 

by J. A. Orton, Treas 60 00 

Greenfield, Mrs. M. K. Tyler 12 00 

Haydenville, by C. D. Wait 6 28 

Medfield. Estate of Lydia A. Dow, by 

W. S. Tilden 255 17 

Milton, C. E. Soc.'by M. I. Fairbank, 

for Alaska 500 

Norton, Trin., by S. H. Cobb 57 74 

Orleans, by O. W. Crosby 12 33 

Palmer, S. S. of the Second, by F. B. 

Pope 5065 

Pittsfield. S. S. of the First Ch. of 

Christ, by Miss M. W. Redfield 8 00 

Rockland, by E. M. Stubbs 15 co 

Springfield. Estate of S. B. Day, by 

C. H. Barrows, Ex 891 97 

Park Ch. add'l, by W. P. Under- 
wood 6 00 

N. Coe 5 00 



Stockbridge, by A. Schilling, Jr $23 60 

Webster, First, by E. L. Spalding 50 00 

West Brookiield, M. J. Holt 1 00 

Wilmington, by Rev. E. Harmon 5 00 

CONNECTICUT-$7,io 3 . 4 o ; of which 
legacies, $6,179.29. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Miss A. W. 
Moore, Treas.: 
Bridgewater, Mrs. E. E. Eritts, for 

Salary Fund 1500 

Hartford, So. Ch. Ladies' Sew. Soc, 
by Mrs. C. E. Billings, special.. .. 52 00 



67 00 

Miss. Soc. of Conn., by D. N. Camp. . 58 58 

Bethel. Friends, by C. W. Shelton. . . 10 50 

Bridgeport, Y. P. S. C. E. of the South 

Ch.,by F. C. Fox 8 80 

Connecticut, A Friend 100 00 

A Friend, for Cuba, by Rev. E. P. 

Herrick 200 

" In memoriam " 1 00 

Cornwall, Estate of S. C. Beers 420 55 

Goshen, by A. M. Norton 64 75 

Guilford, First, by E. W. Leete 25 00 

Haddam. Estate of Christopher Tyler, 

by W. H. Chapman, Ex 4,506 74 

Hartford, C. E. Soc. of Wethersfitld 
Avenue, by Miss L. M. Burt, for 
Cuba 1066 

Fourth, by F. W. Hawley 41 18 

Higganum, by R. J. Gladwin 2200 

Kent, First, by E. R. Eaton 16 17 

Middletown, Y. P. S. C. E., South Ch.. 

by L. E. Brooks, for Salary Fund. . 25 00 

New Britain. Estate of Sophia and 

Cordelia Stanley 186 40 

New Fairfield, Ladies' H. M. Soc, by 

Mrs. C. T. Penny 5 00 

New London, First Ch. of Christ, by 

P. L. Harwood 41 47 

New Milford, A Friend 5 00 

Northford, Y. P. S. C. E., by Miss C. 

L. Munson, for Alaska 1000 

Norwalk, First, by E. L. Boyer 31 52 

Norwich, Estate of Lucy M. Howard, 

by F. A. Robinson. Adm 078 -37 

"ID" 

J . K 50 00 

Salisbury, W. B. H. M., by Mrs. L. 

Warner 10 50 

Miss S. Norton's S. S. class, by Rev. 

J. C. Goddard 50 

Shelton, by J. Tomlinson 54 00 

Simsbury, by A. J. Holcomb 6348 

Southport. by R. W. P. Bulkier 140 00 

Trumbull, Estate of Elijah Beach, by 

A. B. Fairchild, Ex 87 23 

Westport, Y. P. S. C. E., for Alaska 

Work, by Rev. C. W. Shelton 10 00 

Woodbridge. by F. W. Smith to const. 

F. W. Smith a L. M 50 co 



NEW YORK— $609.89; of which legacy, 
$83.90. 

Received by William Spalding, Treas : 

Bay Shore 

Crary's Mills 

Moriah 

Munnsville 

North Java 

Osceola 

Plainfield Center 



36 


00 


3 




2 


68 


1 


88 


3 


85 


10 


00 


5 


00 



January, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



189 



Rockaway Beach $17 00 

Tannersville 3 00 

Wilmington 2 50 



84 91 

Clifton Springs, Mrs. Z. Eddy, for 

freight 3 00 

Cornwall Hollow, Union C. E. Soc, 
by K. M. Sedgwick, for work among 

the Mormons 2 00 

Elbridge, by C. H. Van Vechten 10 40 

Flushing, First, by W. H. Lendrum.. 74 86 

Kiantone, by R. N. Holsapk 2 53 

Morristown, by J. More. . 3 54 

Morrisville, Estate of A B. DeForest, 

by C. A. Fuller 83 90 

" New York State," B. Friends 375 00 

North Lawrence, A. Williams 5 00 

Northville, by J. T. Dcwns 1440 

Norwich, First, by J. McCaw 36 60 

Sherburne, First, by G. W. Lathrop.. 113 75 



NEW JERSEY— $261.22. 

Woman's H. M. Union of the N. J. 
Assoc, Mrs. J. H. Denison,Treas.: 
Montclair, First, for Salary Fund . . 50 00 

Westfield, Woman's Assoc 50 00 

Jr. Branch of Neesima Guild, 
special .- 1500 

115 00 

East Orange, " K " 100 00 

Newark, First, by A. F. Kyner 9 22 

New Jersey, A Friend 1 00 

Orange Valley, by G. E. Spottis- 

woode 56 00 



Hoschton, by Rev. J. C. Forrester . . . 

Lifesey, by Rev. W. H. Graham 

Lovejoy, by Rev. J. H. Nash 

Oakwood, Liberty Ch., by Rev. A. J. 

Lyle 

Sibley, $1 : Williford, $1.30 ; by Rev. 

A. P. Spillers 

Surrency, by Rev. D. F. Steedly 

Wilsonville, by Rev. J. S. King 

ALABAMA— $26.42. 

Amos, by Rev. H. M. Gober 

Art and Asbury, by Rev. S. R. Bra- 
nan 

Central, Kidd and Cotton Store, by 

Rev. J. C. Butler 

Clanton, Kingston, and Mountain 

Sps., by Rev. C. A. Milstead 

Edwardsville and Oxford, by Rev. G. 

W. Vaughan 

Hanceville, Mt. Grove Ch., Tidmore, 

Nectar Ch. and High Rock Ch. and 

Tidwell, Concord Ch., by Rev. J. D. 

Foust 

Hilton, Rose Hill and Georgianna, bv 

Rev. T. A. Pharr '. 

Lamar, by Rev. F. M. Rice 

Lightwood and Central, by Rev. A. 

C.Wells 

River Falls and Wallace, by Rev. C. 

E. Burkett 

Shelby, by Rev. A. T. Clarke 

Tallassee, East Tallassee, Liberty Ch., 

and Good Hope, Texas Union Ch., 

by Rev. J. M. Gipson 

Watford, Bascom Ch., Blackwood and 

Dunedin, by Rev. M. V. Marshall. 
Zada and Spio, by Rev. D. T. Ard 



10 


00 




25 




75 


2 


30 


I 


00 


3 


00 



I 00 

I 50 

3 °° 
1 00 
1 00 



1 50 
5° 



5° 
7 37 



3 °5 
5° 



PENNSYLVANIA-$ 2 8.oo. 

Allentown, A Friend 

Bangor, Welsh, by J. Williams 

Braddock, Slovak Ch., by Rev. H. A. 

Schauffler 

Harford, by E. E. Jones 

Renovo, Swedish, by Rev. G. O. Plant. 
Williamstown, by Rev. D. L. Davis . 



MARYLAND— Legacy, $4,995.00. 

Baltimore, Estate of Mrs M. R. Haw- 
ley 



DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA— $51.00. 

Woman's H. M. Union of the N. J. 

Assoc, Mrs. J. H. Denison.Treas.: 

Washington, First, for Salary Fund. 



NORTH CAROLINA-$ 3 .oo. 
Dudley, by Rev. R. B. Johns. 



GEORGIA— $47.95. 

Amandaville, by Rev. M. G. Fleming. 
Atlanta, Immanuel Ch., by Rev. G. 

A. Hill 

Broden, by Rev. C. C. King 

Cochran, by Rev. G. Home 

Columbus, First, by Rev. G. W. Cum- 

bus 

Duluth, by Rev. W. F. Brewer 

Five Forks, by Rev. T. J. Burden 

Fort Valley, First, by Rev. J. F. 

Blackburn 



LOUISIANA-$ 5 .oo. 

3 00 Welsh, $1. 10 ; China, $2 ; J. B. Fisher, 
2 50 $i.go, by Rev. J. B. Fisher 



FLORIDA-$io 7 .5o. 

Cottondale, County Line Ch., and 
Bonifay, Tulip Ch., by Rev. S. B. 

Judah 1 co 

Haines City, Rev. S. J. Townsend. ... 4 25 

Interlachen, Mrs. W. D. Brown ico 00 

Milligan, by Rev. T. A. Pharr 25 

Moss Bluff and Panasoffkee, by Rev. 
E. D. Luter 200 



OKLAHOMA— $38.72. 

Woman's Missionary Union, Mrs. A. 
5 B. Hammer, Treas 2 50 

Alpha, Parker, and Otter, by Rev. W. 

Kelsey 3 00 

00 Altona, Beulah Ch., by Rev. J. F. 

Robberts 6 50 

Enid, Plymouth Ch., by Rev. C. F. 

Sheldon 10 00 

Independence, by Rev. J. W. Naylor. 5 00 

1 00 Perry, by Rev. B. F. Sewell 2 50 

Ridgeway, by Rev. E. P. Owen 1 22 

3 25 Seward, by Rev. L. S. Childs 2 00 

1 00 Waukomist, by Rev. E. A. Sherrod... 4 00 

3 00 West Guthrie, by Rev. G. M. Rarey. 2 00 

3 9° 

5 00 ARIZONA— $50.00. 
50 

Phoenix, W. Hill, to const. Irene H. 

6 00 Hill a L. M c 00 



190 



The Home Missionary 



January, 1900 



OHIO— $1,330.00. 

Kent, First, byD. E. Cook $14 83 

Saybrook, by S. E. Maltby 6 30 

Shandon, by Rev. J. Scott 23 00 

Received in September, by Rev. J. G. 
Fraser, D.D.: 

Andover, by Mrs. L. R. Griffis 4 00 

Cleveland, Euclid Avenue, by J. 

Snow 24 58 

Y. P. S. C. E., by J. L. Findlay. 10 00 

C. A. Post, special 10 00 

Swedish, by Rev. D. Marcelius. .. 3 00 
Columbus, First, A Friend, by Rev. 

E.J.Converse 1000 

St. Clair Avenue, by Rev. D. F. 

Harris 3 00 

Croton, by Mrs. W. A. Dobbyn . . 4 75 

Delaware, Rev. H. H. Russell, D.D. 5 00 

Eagleville, by Rev. J. B. Jones 2 30 

Elyria, J. F. Brooks, special 1 00 

Grafton, by Miss Maud Cordrey 3 65 

Greenfield, by Mrs. E. J. Sockey ;.. 7 00 

Hudson, F. M. Sprague 1 co 

Johnsonville, by Mrs. M. W. Rob- 
erts 2 00 

Lenox, Ch., $2.50 ; C. E.,$2.so. by 

Rev. J. B. Jones 5 00 

Lyme, by Melvin Wood 22 30 

Madison, by A. S. Stratton 11 26 

Marietta, First, by A. D. Follett. . . 77 49 

Newark, First, by S. J. Davis 4 20 

Parkman, by Mrs. G. Fram 750 

Peking, China, Rev. W. S. Ament, 

D.D . 5 00 

Steubenville, H. G. Dohrman, spe- 
cial 500 

Twinsburg, by O. O. Kelsey 6 20 

Unionville, by I. W. Cone 5 00 

West Williamsfield, by C. R. Cole- 
man 225 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. G. B. 
Brown, Treas.: 

Austinburg 

Cleveland Avenue 

Lyme, M. B 

Windham 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. G. B. 

Brown, Treas. : 
Ashtabula, Second 

Jr. C. E 

Austinburg, C. E 

Berlin Heights 

Brecksville 

Charlestown ... 

Chatham 

Cincinnati, Vine Street 

Cleveland, Archwood Ave. C. E.. 

Bethlehem 

Elyria, Second 

Garrettsville, C. E 

Hudson 

Lodi 

Lyme 

Marietta, Harmar 

Medina 

Olmsted, Second 

Paddy's Run 

Richfield 

Sheffield.... 

Tallmadge 

Toledo, Washington Street 

C.E 

Central 

Wauseon 

Wayne ... 

Wellington 

Youngstown, Elm Street 



Received bv Rev. J. G. Fraser, D.D. , 
Treas. Bohemian Board : 
Cleveland, Euclid Avenue, by J. 
Snow 



242 48 



" 95 
3 4° 

10 00 
5 00 

2 50 

3 00 
5 00 

35 00 

2 50 

3 °° 
5 00 

3 °° 

4 SO 

5 00 
3 07 
2 00 

22 00 

2 50 

3 °° 

3 °° 
1 00 

4 00 
10 00 

1 5° 
10 00 
9 00 

1 75 

2 50 
4 55 

178 72 



6 28 



Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser, D.D., 

Brunswick, by Mrs. A. E. Ayland 
Ceredo, West Va., by Rev. G. 

Gadsby 

Chardon, by M. L. Maynard 

Cleveland, W. S. Bailey 

Dr. C. F. Dutton 

Lake View, by Mrs. E. F. Barstow 

C. E. Ferrell 

Cyril Chapel, by Rev. J. Musil. . . 

Columbus, Plymouth, by E. M. 

Parker 

S. S., by Arthur Crable 

J. W. Brewer 

Dover, by D. D. Osborn 

Elyria, E. W. Metcalf, special 

Freedom, by F. M. Heyd 

Hudson, Mrs. Mary P. Webster 

Jefferson, Kingdom Extension Soc, 

by Rev. L. J. Luethi 

Kingsville, Mrs. S. C. Kellogg 

Little Muskingum, by B. R. Day. . . 
Madison, Jr. C. E., by A. S. Stratton 

David F. Bailey 

Mesopotamia, S. S., by Mrs. C. A. 

Smith 

Newark, Plymouth, by Rev. T. M. 

Higginbotham 

Norwalk, S. S., by A. T. Symons . . 
Oberlin, Prof. A. H. Currier, D.D. 
Paddy's Run, by C. A. Gleason .... 
Richfield, by Rev. W. W. Leslie . . . 
Thompson, by Dea. F. E. Benjamin 
Vermillion, C. E., by Rev. J. A. 

Kaley 

York, by Rev. L. W. Mahn 

Youngstown, Mrs. Rev. J. B. Davies 
Rev. and Mrs. Irving W. Metcalf.. 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. G. B. 

Brown, Treas. : 
Akron, First 

West 

Andover 

Ashtabula, First 

Bellevue 

Belpre 

Berlin Heights. C. E 

Brecksville, C.E 

Burton, C. E 

Chardon 

Chatham, M. B 

Cincinnati. Vine Street 

Walnut Hills, C. E 

Claridon 

Clarksfield 

Cleveland, Archwood Avenue. . . . 

First 

Plymouth 

Pilgrim 

Jr. Dept. S. S 

Franklin Avenue 

Park 

Trinity 

Lakeview 

Columbus, Plymouth 

Eastwood 

Mayflower 

Covenant « 

C. E 

Jr.C. E 



46 00 
58 

4 00 
65 86 



4 00 
17 26 

5 00 
5 00 
5 00 
1 00 

10 00 

24 68 
7 00 

1 00 

25 19 
87 50 

7 3° 
5 00 

10 00 

5 00 

5 00 

6 00 
08 

5 08 

5 00 

6 50 

7 00 

4 00 
12 00 

2 00 

2 00 

7 00 

5 00 
10 00 

298 59 



25 00 
8 50 

2 00 
10 50 

8 25 

3 00 
2 00 
2 00 
2 75 

1 co 
5 00 

10 00 

4 00 

2 00 
2 00 

5 co 
15 22 

11 00 
7 00 
5 00 
2 00 
2 00 
2 50 
2 00 
2 00 

4 00 

5 °° 

6 00 
6 00 
2 00 



anuary, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



191 



Dayton 

Elyria, First 

C. E 

Second, C. E. for Alaska 

Fredericksburg 

Freedom 

Geneva 

Gustavus 

Hudson 

Huntsburg, K. E . S 

Kirtland, K. E. S 

Lima 

Litchfield 

Lorain 

Lyme 

Y. P. M.C 

Madison 

Mansfield, First 

Mayflower 

C.E 

Marysville 

Mt. Vernon 

Newark, First, C.E 

Plymouth 

New London 

Norwalk 

Oberlin, First 

Second, L. S., Rev. H. M. Ten- 

ney, D.D., a L. M 

C.E 

Paddy's Run, Jr. C. E 

Painesville 

Ridgeville Corners 

Ruggles, Mrs. N. Kirkton a L. M. 

Sandusky, L. S. U 

Springfield, First 

Tallmadge 

Y. L 

Toledo, First 

Second 

Washington St., W. M. U 

Plymouth „ 

Birmingham, S. S. Primary 

Miss Dean's S. S. class 

Twinsburg 

Unionville 

Wakeman 

West Andover 

West Williamsfield 

York 



Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser, D.D., 
Treas. Bohemian Board, Cleve- 
land : 
Rootstown 



INDIANA-$2 3 . 45 . 

Received by Rev. E. D. Curtis: 

Angola, Y. P. S. C. E 

Indianapolis, Brightwood Ch 

People's Ch . . 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. A. D. 
Davis, Treas. : 
Alexandria 



ILLINOIS-fiso.oo. 

Oak Park, Mrs. M. A. Keep, for Cuba, 
$50 ; Alaska, $50 ; general work, 



MISSOURI -$69.36. 

Carthage, First, by L. N. Manley. 
Kidder, by Rev. A. M. Beman . . . 
Old Orchard, by C. O. Twining.., 



$5 00 
16 00 
6 00 
2 83 

1 5° 

1 00 

10 00 

2 00 
S °° 

1 15 
4 9 6 

3 °° 

4 00 

3 °° 

5 5° 

4 00 

3 °° 

4 5° 
15 00 

2 00 

1 00 
4 00 

2 00 
2 00 
2 00 

1 25 

2 25 

50 00 

4 00 

3 °° 

11 00 
3 00 

52 26 

5 00 

15 °° 

16 05 
2 20 

10 00 



5 °° 
1 00 

1 00 
7 00 

2 60 
5 00 

2 30 
10 CO 

3 5° 

494 92 



5 00 
8 00 

6 00 



MINNESOTA-$2 9 . 7 9. 

Bewabik, by Rev. C. E. Wilcox 

Dawson, by Rev. A. H. Tebbets 

Edgerton, by Rev. P. H. Fish 

Glyndon, Ch. and S. S., by C. G. 

Tracy 

Lake Park, by F. M. Higley 

Minneapolis, Bethany Ch., by Rev. 

S. G. Updyke 

Pelican Rapids, by Rev. L. A. Sahl- 

strom 

Villard, by Rev. B. Samuel 

Winona, Scand. Ch., by Rev. H. F. 

Josephson 



KANSAS— $146.59. 

Received by Rev. L. P. Broad : 

Buffalo Park 

Geneva 

Goodland 

Kiowa, Ladies' Soc 

Lenora 

Twelve Mile 

Wabaunsee Assoc. Meeting.. 



19 65 

20 26 
9 45 



Received by Rev. A. C. Hogbin, 
Treas. : 

Cora, Harvest Festival 

Little River 

Partridge, Harvest Festival 

Sedgwick. Harvest Festival 

Western Park. ... 



fio 00 
5 00 



94 78 



St. Louis, First German Ch., by Rev. 

M. Krey 

Bethlehem, Boh., by E. Wrbetzky.. 
Reber Place Ch., by Rev. F. 

Stringer 



MICHIGAN— $102.59 ; of which legacy, 



Covert, Legacy of Mrs. Abigail G. 

Pixley, by F. E. Rood 

Maybee, German, by Rev. M. E. 

Eversz 

Memphis, Y. P. S. C. E., by Mrs. L. 

R. Shattuck, for Alaska 



WISCONSIN-$2.i 5 . 

Clear Lake, Swedish, by Rev. J. 

Petterson 

Glenwood, Swedish, by Rev. O. Ohl- 

son 

Wood Lake and Doctors Lake, by 

Rev. F. G. Haggquist 



[Erratum : Park Falls, $26.50, by 
Rev. E. L. Morse, erroneously acknowl- 
edged in April receipts, less 3 00 

2 15 
IOWA— $462.00. 

Algona, A. Zahlten, to const. Miss C. 

Zahlten a L. M 50 00 

Edgewood, L. D. Piatt 400 00 

Hebron, A Friend 2 00 

Iowa H. M. Soc, J. H. Merrill, Treas. : 

Algona, Y. P. S. C. E., for Alaska.. 10 00 



I 


40 


1 


25 


2 


So 


5 


!5 



1 73 

2 00 

3 85 

7 °3 

4 50 



4 IS 
3 00 



7 


60 


1 
2 


35 
61 


10 


00 


5 


00 


3 


00 


5 


22 



34 78 



15 5o 
24 00 
23 89 
9 00 
18 66 



91 05 



192 



The Home Missionary 



January, 1900 



Alton, by Rev. G. W. Sargent $15 86 

Argentine, by Rev. G. E. Etherton.. 50 
Clark's Creek, Union S. S., by Rev. J. 

Wilde, for Cuba 1 90 

Scatter Creek, by Rev. J. A. Richards. 2 50 



NEBRASKA— $58.66. 

Arborville. Sr. C. E..byF. N. Recknor 3 10 

Arcadia, by Rev. W. H. Houston 2 00 

Burwel), First, by Rev. A. E. Davies. 6 65 

Butte. First, by Rev. J. Gray 1 50 

Carroll, by Rev. S. Jones 1 50 

Friend and Turkey Creek, German, 

by Rev. G. L. Brakemeyer 1 36 

Germantown, German Ch., by Rev. C. 

Richert 10 00 

Hallam, Mrs. Clawson, by Rev. M. E. 

Eversz 3 00 

Hyannis, by Rev. H. C. Cleveland... 5 00 
McCook, $7.25 ; Hayes Co., $6.25, by 

Rev. G. Essig 13 50 

Norfolk, Second, by Mrs. C. J. Chap- 
man 1 75 

Pickrell. by Miss B. Whitmer 3 80 

Sutton, German Ch., by Rev. G. Grob. 5 50 



NORTH DAKOTA-$7 9 .o 5 . 

Received by Rev. E. H. Stickney, 
W. H. M. Union : 

Caledonia 3 00 

Carrington. Mrs. A. D. Parker... 2 00 

Gardner. Miss A. J. Hunter 2 25 

Rose Valley 2 32 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. J. M. 
Fisher, Treas. : 

Cooperstovvn 6 00 

Rose Valley 68 

6 68 

Cando, by Rev. S. Williams 1 95 

Glen Ullen, German, by Rev. J. C. 

Schwabenland 12 50 

Jamestown, $14.52 '• Eldridge, $3.83, 

by Rev. C. H. Phillips 18 35 

Kulm, D. Bartel, per M. Breiber, by 

Rev. M. E. Eversz 5 00 

North Dakota, A Friend 25 00 



SOUTH DAKOTA-$i 37 .99. 

Woman's H. M. Union, So. Dak., Mrs. 
F. M. Wilcox, Treas. : 

Academy 1 50 

Armour 290 

Belle Fourche 2 80 

Dead wood 3 20 

Firesteel , 1 60 

Lead 4 80 

Lesterville 1 00 

Pierre 2 80 

Rapid City 6 00 

Yankton 4 28 

Vermilion 5 50 

Wakonda 5 60 



15 


OO 


1 r 


5° 


5 


OO 


1 


OO 


3 


51 


20 


OO 



41 



Huron, Rev. W. H. Thrall 

Iroquois, $10 ; Osceola, $1.50, by 

Rev. E. Martin 

Lake Preston, by Rev. S. A. Van 

Luven 

Lebanon Springs, by Rev.C. H. Dreis- 

bach 

Mission Hill, by Rev. D. B. Nichols. 
Neuburg, German Ch., by Rev. M. E. 

Eversz 



COLORADO-S239.13. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. B. C. 

Valentine, Treas... 18074 

Boulder 5 00 

Denver. South Broadway, Thank- 
offering 671 

Plymouth, Y. P. S. C. E., for 

Alaska 5 00 

Eaton, Y. P. S. C. E., for Alaska... 10 00 

Greeley. Thank-offering 17 63 

Highlandlake 558 

S. S 47 

23 1 r 3 

New Castle, by Rev. C. M. Thomas 3 00 
Piceance, W. H. Violett, by Rev. R. 

H. Harper 500 



WYOMING-$ 7 .7S- 

Woman's Missionary Union, by Miss 

E. McCrum : 

Wheatland. First. Ladies' H. and 

F. Miss. Soc 

MONTANA- $5.00. 

Butte, Bethlehem German Ch., by 
Rev. J. Single 

IDAHO-$io.oo. 

Woman's Missionary Union, Mrs. L. 
H. Johnston, Treas. : 
Pocatello 



CALIFORNIA-$i 55 30. 

Avalon, by Rev. W. W. Lovejoy 8 05 

Los Angeles. Third Ch.,by Rev. J. D. 

Habbick 

Ontario, Rev. D. B. Eells 

Pescadero, by Rev. E. Hoskins 

Rocklin. by Rev. W. C. Day 

Rohnerville. Rev. F. M. Washburn.. 

San Diego. H. Sheldon 

San Diego, Second Ch. and La Mesa, 

by Rev. T. R. Earl 

San Rafael, by Rev. W. H. Atkinson. 
Santa Rosa, by Rev. L. D. Rathbone. 

Scotia, by Rev. W. Gordon 

Sherman, by Rev. E. Cash 

South California, Individuals, special. 
Woodland, by Rev. E. D. Haven 



OREGON-S1750. 

Condon, by Rev. W. Hurlbut 10 00 

Eugene, by Rev. R. C. Brooks 7 50 



4 


go 


2 


50 


2 


00 


1 


75 


10 


CO 


25 


CO 


S 


CO 


2 


50 


7 


50 


3 


00 


2 


50 


bo 


CO 



Ruffalo Gap. by Rev. T. ^hirloway. . 
Buffalo Gap and W. G. Flat, by Rev. 

T. Thirloway 

De Smet. by Rev. T. G. Langdale . . 
Eureka, Rev. H. Hetzlerand wife... 
Faulkton, by Rev. F. Mitchell 



S 00 

WASHINGTON-S90.15. 

5 00 
12 50 Aberdeen, Swede, by Rev. M. Peter- 

2 50 son 

15 00 Cathlamet, by Rev. A. Brady 



2 25 

3 65 



January, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



193 



-Cheney, by Rev. F. B. Doane $26 00 

Eureka, by Rev. A. R. Olds g 75 

Leavenworth, by Rev. J. W. H. Lock- 
wood 7 00 

Olympia, by Rev. W. A. Remele 2 00 

Ritzville, German, Zions, by Rev. G. 

Schenerle 10 00 

Rosalia, by Rev. J. P. Carv 14 co 

Seattle, Taylor Ch., by Rev. G. H. 

Lee S So 

Springdale and Chewelah, by Rev. E. 

Owens........ 200 

Washougal and Mt. Pleasant, by Rev. 
G. Baker 8 00 



UNKNOWN— $52.31. 

Anonymous $22 31 

Anonymous 2500 

A Life Member 500, 

October Receipts : Contributions 7,532 8* 

Legacies 17,553 7^ 

Interest. 443 00 

Annuity 550 00 

Permanent Fund. 100 00 

. Home Missionary. 22 n 

Literature '. . 1 20 

$26,202 94 



NOVEMBER, 1899 



MAINE— $26.50. 

Madison, by F. Dinsmore $1600 

North Gorham, Miss C. C. Varney, 

special 10 00 

Waterford, Mrs. T. S. Perry 50 



NEW HAMPSHIRE-$io 7 . 3 8. 

N. H. H. M. Soc, Hon. L. D. Stevens, 

Treas 6918 

Claremont, Mrs. N. P. Washburn 40 

Hollis, A Friend 5 00 

Littleton, by Miss K. Sanger 5 10 

North Hampton, by E. M. Smith... . 19 20 
Smithville, Children's Fair, by Mrs. 

C.Wheeler 850 



VERMONT— $542.75 ; of which legacy, 




$500.00. 




Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. R. Mac- 




Kinnon, Treas. : 




For Salary Fund : 




Barre, First, Y. P. S. C. E 


6 00 


Bethel, Y. P. S. C. E 


7 00 


Fairfax, Miss Hunt, for Cuba 


1 00 




1 00 




2 00 


Fairlee 


1 00 


* ■ Newfane, Homeland Circle 


5 00 


Post Mills, Y. P. S. C. E 


55 




7 00 




7 00 



Brattleboro, Estate of Mrs. Asenath 
T. Campbell, by Charles E. Allen, 
Ex 

West Brattleboro, '' In memory of our 
Alice who has joined the Heavenly 
Circle," by Mrs. J. H. Babbitt.. . . 



37 55 

500 00 
5 20 



MASSACHUSETTS — $33,501.17 ; of 
which legacies, $24,100 00. 

Mass. Home Miss. Soc, by Rev. E. B. 

Palmer 8,000 00 

By request of donors, of which for 
Alaska, $10 33 00 

Woman's H. M. Assoc, Miss L. D. 
White, Treas. : 
Oakham 5 00 

Amesbury, Main Street, by C. F. 
Hovey 50 00 



Boston, A. G. Nelson, for Salary 

Fund $25 00 

Curtisville, by F. W. Heath 17 89 

East Somerville, Franklin Street Or- 
thodox S. S., by F. R. Nickerson. . . 6 00 
Groton, Union, by G. W. Shattuck. .. 94 80 
Hadley, Y. P. S. C. E., by M. F. 

Gates, for Alaska 950 

Holyoke, First, by J. H. Wylie. Jr... 24 93 
Leicester, Estate of Hannah W. Chil- 

son, by Dr. C. G. Stearns, Ex 1,100 00 

Legacy of Mrs. Mary Davis Denny, 

by Hon. C. A. Denny, Ex 500 00 

Lowell, from the late Miss Maria 
Cottle, by her sister, Mrs. S. Blan- 

chard 1,000 00 

Mittineague, by E. H. Shepard 16 10 

Orange, Central, by G. W. Fry 36 45 

Salem, Miss E. C. Ball 100 

Sheffield, by Dr. A. T. Wakefield 5 50 

Springfield, O. Church 50 00 

Ware, Stiver Circle, by H. S. Hyde. . . 25 00 
Worcester, Estate of Albert Curtis, by 

Col. E. B. Stoddard, Ex 22,500 00 

Plymouth, by F. W. Chase 1 00 

RHODE ISLAND-$ 3 o 7 .oo ; of which 
legacy, $207.00. 

Central Falls, E. L. Freeman 100 00 

Pawtucket, Estate of Hugh McCrum. 207 00 

CONNECTICUT— $2,428.11 ; of which 
legacy, $800.00. 

Miss. Soc. of Conn., W. W. Jacobs, 

Treas 118 97 

Woman's H. M. Union, Miss A. W. 
Moore, Treas. : 

Bridgeport. L. B. F. of South Ch., 
by Miss M. L. Higby, for Salary 
Fund 48 68 

Fairfield, by Mrs. Mary C. Brewer, 
of which $10, for Salary Fund. ... 20 00 

Meriden, First, L. B. S., by Mrs. F. 
E. Hinman, special 10 00 

New Britain, South Ch., Jr. C. E. S., 
by Miss G. E. Rogers, for Salary 
Fund ..... 2 00 

Prospect, Annual offering, by Mrs. 
W. H. Phipps for Salary Fund 12 50 

Ridgebury, offering of a few ladies, 
by Mrs. M. P. Sanborn, for Salary 
Fund , 200 

Taftville, by Mrs. W. Carr, for Sal- 
ary Fund 9 46 

Winsted, First, Ladies' Union, by 
Mrs. L. M. Blake, for Salary Fund. 25 00 



129 64 



i 9 4 



The Home Missionary 



January, 1900 



Berlin, Second, $32.20; Ch. and S. S., 

$55.10, by C. S. "Webster $8730 

Bridgeport, S. S. of the Second, by F. 

C. Fox 25 00 

Greenwich, Second, H. A. C 1 00 

Second, by Dr. E. N. Judd 125 00 

Hartford, Centre Ch. S. S.,byE. C. 

Stone , . . . . 30 00 

Mrs. M. A. Williams 15 00 

Ivoryton, Mite Box Coll., by E. A. 

Northrop 32 45 

Marlborough. Estate of Charles Buell 800 00 
Middletown, South Ch., A Friend, by 

G. A. Craig 10 00 

Morris, Mrs. M. W. Skilton 300 

New London, Jr. C. E. of the First, 
by Miss L. H. Allyn, for Salary 
Fund 4 00 

W. H.C 1,00000 

Newtown, by G. F. Duncombe. .... 10 50 

Pomfret, S. S. Rally, by O. Mathew- 

son 15 00 

Sound Beach, Pilgrim Ch., by C. T. 

Peck 625 

Vernon Centre, by W. C. Driggs 15 00 



NEW YORK— $6,154.40; of which leg- 
acy, $480.27. 

Received by William Spalding, Treas. : 
Camden, Amaret L. Smith, in 

memory of Theresa Smith 

Henrietta 

Lincklaen 

Newburgh, add'l. 

North Collins 

Oriskany Falls 

Savannah 

Sidney 

Westmoreland 

E. Curtis 



141 42 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. J. J. 

Pearsall, Treas. : 

Binghamton, Plymouth Ch 10 00 

Canandaigua 13800 

Homer 1250 

Honeoye 10 00 

Y. L. M. S 342 

Ithaca 38 65 

S. S 21 81 

Home Dept 5 84 

Jamespo.t 10 00 

Little Valley 6 00 

Napoli 1000 

New York City, Bedford Park, C. E. 5 00 

Sherburne 85 00 

356 22 

Angola, A. H. Ames 5 00 

Binghamton, First, by A. G. Sheak. .. 64 01 
Brooklyn, Estate of Eliza K. Bige- 

low, by G. R. Lockwood, Ex .... 480 27 

S. S. of the South, by D. H. Bergen 25 00 

Buffalo, First, by R. K. Strickland. . . 200 00 

Copenhagen, H. A. Lawrence 2600 

Fairport, Mrs. M. Olney, of which $25, 

for N. Y. State H. M. Soc, by Mrs. 

M. Olney 40 00 

Fishkill-on-Hudson. M. S. Kittredge. 15 00 

Honeoye, by S. M . Day 32 00 

New York City, from the late Mrs. 
Willard Parker, by her daughter, 

Mrs. D. M. Stimson 4,500 00 

Pilgrim Ch., by S. Scott no 00 

Orient, by M . B. Brown 14 56 

Otto, by E. M. Pool 5 25 

Richford, Harvest Festival, by W. J. 

Hutchinson 2855 



50 


00 


5 


o- > 


5 


00 


3 
8 


52 


6 
6 


09 

UO 


45 
2 


OO 
8l 


10 


OO 



Salamanca, by B. B. Weber $8001 

Smyrna, A Friend 12 00 

Wellsville, First, by E. M. Fisher 52 37 

West Bloomfield, by M. H. Shepard.... 38 75 



NEW JERSEY-$ 3 o.io. 

East Orange. Thank-offering, Trinity 
Ch. Guild, by A. G. Bates 26 10 

Jersey City, Waverly Ch., by S. V. 

Billings 1300 



PENNSYLVANIA-$2 7 o. 5 o. 

Woman's Missionary Union, Mrs. D. 
Howells, Treas.: 
Guys Mills 5 00 

Braddock, First, by T. Addenbrook.. 14 25 
Chandlers Valley, Scand. Free Evan. 

Ch., by Rev. C. J. Lundquist 1 25 

Pittsburg, " Cash" 250 co 



MARYLAND— $5.50. 
Canton, by Rev. T. M. Beadenkoff . . . 

NORTH CAROLINA— $1.68. 
King's Mountain, by M. E. Newton.. 



GEORGIA-$2.oo. 

Demorest, Union Ch., by Rev. W. O. 
Phillips 



ALABAMA-$20.25. 

Fort Payne, Emanuel Ch. and Tucker, 
Pleasant Grove and Mt. Tabor, by 
Rev. J. J. Bunnell 

Gate City, by Rev. H. L. Hargett 

Henderson, Wesley Chapel, by Rev. 
J. L. Stewart 

Rays Hill, Pine Grove Ch., by Rev. 
W. C. Culver 

Talladega, " The Little Helpers," by 
Miss A. E. Farrington 



5 00 

5 °° 

5 00 

25 

5 00 



FLORIDA— $173.62. 

Woman's Home Missionary Union, 
Mrs. W. D. Erown, Treas.: 
For Ybor City Mission : 

Daytona 15 00 

Haines City 225 

Jacksonville 51 75 

Key West 4 65 

Coll. taken at Annual Meeting . 25 00 

Lake Helen, C. E. S 8 00 

Jr. C. E 1 

Melbourne, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. 

Phillips 10 00 

Orange Park 5 00 

Orange City, Birthday offerings. . 2 00 

Ormond ■ 7 00 

Pasadena, C. E 3 00 

Phillips 3 00 

Tampa 2 00 

West Longwood 1 84 

Winter Park 20 00 

Ybor City 8 68 

Tuition 70 

170 87 

Hurobo, by Rev. L. Miller 2 75 



January, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



195 



TEXAS— $15.93. 

Received by Rev. L. Rees : 
Paris, First, $10.00; Ladies' Soc, 



ILLINOIS— $16.21. 

Wheaton, The College Ch. of Christ, 
by E. A. Guild 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. A. Geen, 
Treas. : 
Dallas 



OKLAHOMA-$i9.o 3 . 

Guthrie, Vittum Mem. Ch., Pleasant 
Ridge, by Rev. L. J. Parker 

Okarche, First, by Rev. J. S. Murphy 

Perkins, First, $1.00, and Olivet, $3.43, 
by Rev. W. Full 

Stillwater, Union Ch., by Rev. C. W. 
Snyder 

Wellston, by Rev. H. L. Saunders 



ARIZONA— $2.00. 



Tempe, Second, by Rev. J. Soza. 



OHIO— $498.64. 

Garrettsville, by H. N. Merwin 

Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser, Sec: 

Ashland, J. O. Jennings 

Ashtabula, Swedish, by Rev. C. A. 
Widing 

Finns, by Rev. K. A. Lindroos. . . 

Berea, by S. L. Root, Tr 

Berlin Heights, by Mrs. F.Pag 

Canfield, by Rev. C. W. Riggs 

Clarksfield, by Mrs. W. H. Winans. 
Cleveland, Euclid Ave., by J. Snow 

Plymouth, by S. H. Stetson 

Jones Ave., by W. W.Jones 

Pilgrim, by H. C. Holt 

Union, Y. P. S. C. E., by Rev. C. 
H . Lemmon 

Trinity, by A . Williamson 

Olivet, Rev. F. A. Humphreys... . 

Conneaut, by G. W. Traver 

Hudson, by Miss E. E. Metcalf 

Huntsburg, by E. J. Eggleston 

Marietta, Harmar, by Rev. V. 

Bayer 

Lexington, by Rev. H. F. Thomp- 
son 

North Fairfield, by Rev. G. W. 

Wells 

Norwalk, Dea. and Mrs. Bebour 

Oberlin, First S. S., by J. M. Smith. 
Richfield, Addl., by Rev. N. N. 

Leslie 

Rockport, by Rev. R. Stapleton 

Rootstown, by Rev. C. N. Queen.. . 

Sandusky, by H. H. West 

Toledo, Washington St., by A. W. 

Boardman 



Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser, D.D., 
for Cleveland Bohemian Work, 
Ohio : 
Cleveland, Euclid Ave., by J. 

Snow 

Plymouth, by S. H. Stilson 

Pilgrim, by H.C.Holt 



INDIANA-$8.3S. 

Fort Wayne, South Ch., by Rev. D. 

T. Williams 

Indianapolis, Covenant Ch., by Rev. 

J. R. Mason 



MISSOURI-S46.38. 

93 Green Ridge, by E. E. G. Durand 

Kansas City, Olivet Ch., by Rev. R. 

C. Walton 

Sedalia. First, by W. D. Challacombe. 

Springfield, German S. S., $4.00 ; Rev. 

P. Burkhardt, $2.00 ; and F. Weiss, 

6 00 $2.00, by Rev. P. Burkhardt 

6 50 

4 43 IOWA— $89.81 ; of which legacy, $67.23. 

1 00 Des Moines, Estate of Mrs. H. R. Rol- 

2 00 lins, by S. A. Merrill 

Traer, by Mrs. T. H. Best 



MINNESOTA— $812.56. 

Minn. Home Miss. Soc, Rev. J. H. 

Morley, Treas., by Rev. S. V. S. 

Fisher : 

Anoka 

Claremont 

Duluth, Morley 

Elk River 

Fairmont 

Granada 

Groveland 

Lake City 

Minneapolis, Plymouth 

Vine 

First 

Morristown 

New Ulm 

Ortonville 

Rose Creek 

Round Prairie 

St. Charles 

Spring Valley, C. E 

Wabasha 

Winona 

S.S 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. M. W. 
Skinner, Treas. : 

Austin 

Anoka 

Benson, S.S 

Campbell 

Cannon Falls 

Cottage Grove 

Detroit 

Duluth, Pilgrim 

Elk River 

Hancock, S. S 

Hawley, S. S 

Lake City 

Lamberton, C. E 

Minneapolis, Plymouth 

Park Avenue 

C. E. for Salary Fund 

First 

Lora Hollister 

Vine 

Fremont Avenue C. E. for Salary 

Fund 

Union 

Mantorville 

Mazeppa 

New Ulm 

Northfield 

Orrock, S. S 

Paynesville 

Pillsbury 

St. Paul, Plymouth 

Park 



iS 5° 
10 00 

2 25 

6 00 
8 40 

7 00 

3 67 

4 00 
16 85 
14 00 
10 00 
60 00 

3 3° 

5 °° 
1 00 

21 16 

6 00 



5 00 

6 50 
2 00 

15 00 

1 00 
20 00 
60 03 
54 33 

10 76 



6 09 
14 00 
90 06 



4 83 



7 85 
25 70 



67 '23 



7 25 
1 10 



8 25 

1 75 

2 52 

*4 54 
4 00 

1 65 

2 50 

2 3 3 Z 
64 44 
12 00 
50 00 

4 00 
20 00 

6 00 

4 00 

5 14 

3 °° 
5 00 
8 93 

50 00 
1 00 



27 70 
5 00 

1 25 

3 33 
16 80 

5 °° 
5 °° 

26 76 
5 00 

2 22 

4 00 

55 47 

1 20 

30 51 

27 62 
10 00 
19 5° 

5 00 
7 66 

4 00 
16 00 
10 00 
14 00 
10 00 

5 °° 
75 

9 00 

3 i° 
22 92 

14 55 



196 



The Home Missionary- 



January, 1900 



Bethany 

South Park 

University Avenue 

Stewartville 

Wabasha 

Wadena 

Waterville 

Winona, First, $5; S. S. $5, for 

Bohemian work 

Zumbrota 



Less Expenses. 



Athens and Spencer Brook, Swedish 

Chs., by Rev. A. P. Engstrom 

Belview, by Mrs. W. H. Wallace 

Campbell, Union Ch., by Rev. F. 

Wrigley 

Excelsior, by C. L. Mears 

Farris and Cass Lake, by Rev. A. 

Clark 

Glyndon, by C. G. Tracy 

Lake Benton, by Rev. R. G. Jones 

Minneapolis. Thirty-eighth Street. $3 ; 
Y. P. S. C. E., $1, by Rev. S. J. 

Rogers 

Swedish Temple, by Rev. J. M. 

Ahnstrom 

Scand. Evan. Ch., by Rev. C. B. 

Bjuge 

Kanaranzi Swedish Ch., by Rev. J. 

F. Okerstein 

Perham, by Rev. W. E. Griffith 

St. Paul, Y. P. S. C. E., Pacific Ch., 

by F. T. Benson, for Alaska 

German Peoples Ch., by Rev. W. 

Oehler 

Sandstone, Scand. Ch., by Rev. J. 

Rood 

Wabasha, by R. L. Breed 



KANSAS-$33i.io. 

Received by Rev. L. P. Broad : 

Anthony 

Argentine, S. S., Harvest Festival... 

Ford, Ch., $1 ; Ladies Soc. $4 ; and 
S. S., Harvest Festival, $3 

Independence, Ingraham Memorial 
Fund 

Kansas City. First. Harvest Festival 

North Topeka, Junior Y. P. S. C. E. 

Osawatomie, S. S., Harvest Festi- 
val 

Ottawa, Harvest Festival 

Partridge, Harvest Festival.. 

Pauline. Harvest Festival. . . . 

Wellsville 



Received by Rev. A. C. Hogbin, 

Treas.: 

Clay Centre 

Hiawatha 

Newton 

Harvest Festival 

S. S 

Sabetha 

Severy, Harvest Festival 



Alton, Rev. Geo. W. Sargent. . . 
Argentine, by Rev. G. E. Etherton... 
Kensington, by Rev. W. H. Merrill.. . 

Plevna, by Rev. M. W. Woods 

Topeka, Jr. Soc. of C. E., First Ch.. by 
G. E. Noble, for Alaska 



$5 00 

4 00 

1 25 
3 °° 

5 00 
21 58 

5 °° 



10 00 

11 37 


726 58 
10 00 



716 58 



1 35 
6 00 



3 


00 


3 


00 


11 


00 


4 


00 


5 


25 


3 


IX , 


1 


00 


5 


00 



1 35 
11 03 



13 15 
2 00 



3 


30 


5 


CO 


1 


95 


3° 


00 


6 


00 


1 


s8 


10 


eo 



84 08 



30 

65 


OO 

00 


9 
14 
2 


21 
56 
62 


60 


OO 


13 


15 


194 


54 


3 


5° 


10 


00 



NEBRASKA-$n 7 .o 7 . 

Hastings. First, by F. L. Knapp $37 c6 

Lincoln, Y. P. S. C. E.. of the First, 

by Miss L. Sumner 15 00 

German Ch., by Rev. E. C. Osthoff 10 00 
German Ch., Ladies Soc, by Rev. 

E. C. Osthoff 1000 

Petersburg, by Rev. J. Roberts 10 00 

Pierce, First, by Rev. C. D. Gearhart 3 75 
Princeton, Ch.,' S3 ; Ladies Soc, fs ; 
Hallam, $5, by Rev. R. Hilker- 

baeumer 1300 

Spencer, First, by Rev. G. R. Martin. 2 26 

Stanton, bv Rev. J. J. Klopp 6 00 

Thedford, by Rev. E. W. Ellis 10 00 



NORTH DAKOTA-$i 3 2. 59 . 



Antelope, $5 ; and Dwight, $6, by 
Rev. O. P. Champlin 

Fessenden, German Ch., by Rev. P. 
Lich 

Kulm, Gnadenfeld. St. Johns. Hoff- 
nungsfeld, Friedensfeld, Eigen- 
heim, Nazareth, and Postthal. by 
Rev. M. Treiber 

Oberon, First, by Rev. E. E. Saunders 

Pingree. by Rev. W. H. Hubbell. 

Sanborn. Central Ch., by Rev. J. R. 
Beebe 

Sykeston and Cathay, Rev. J. L. 
Martin 

Williston, by Rev. W. Griffith 



SOUTH DAKOTA-$ 75 .i 9 . 

Beulah, by Rev. J. A. Walton 

Canton, First, by Rev. J. Hamerson.. 

Chamberlain, by Rev. W. Ellwood . . . 

Columbia, United Ch.,by Rev. H. W. 
Webb 

Gettysburg, by Rev. R. B. Hall 

Gothland, by E. F. Lyman 

Howard, by Rev. T. H. Hill 

Redfield, by Rev. L. Reynolds 

Scotland, German Ch., by Rev. M. 
E. Eversz 

Valley Springs, by Rev. W. C. Gil- 
more 

Wolf Greek, German Ch., by Rev. J. 
Sattler 



COLORADO-S59-SO. 

Buena Vista, First, by Rev. R. B. 

Larkin 

Fruita. Ch.. $ s .<5o: Y. P. S. C. E., $6.25, 

by Rev. R. H. Harper 

Lafayette, by Rev. G. L. Shull 

Lyons, by Rev. G. A. Chatfield ..... 
North Denver, by Rev. J. H. Jenkins. 



WYOMING— $2.70. 
Douglas, by Rev. W. E. M. Stewart 



MONTANA-$io.2 5 . 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. W. S. 
Bell. Treas : 

Helena 

Red Lodge 

Special 



11 00 

5 00 



x, 60 
4 2 5 
2 24 



1 00 

3 50 



2 


6 s 


4 


65 


5 


5 r -> 


1 


25 


3 


00 


2 


79 


3 


00 


iH 


10 


=5 


00 


7 


00 


2 


= 5 



5 00 

11 75 

19 35 

5 55 

17 85 



5 00 

5 00 
25 



January, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



197 



UTAH-I2.50. 

Robinson, by Rev. F. Foster. 
IDAHO— $34.05. 



Woman's Missionary Union, Mrs. L. 
H. Johnston, Treas. : 
Weiser 

Boise, by Rev. R. B. Wright 



Redondo Beach, by Rev. C. Y. Snell . 
San Andreas, by Rev. B. F. Moody... 
Spring Valley, C. E., by Rev. 1. W. 

Atherton 

West Saticoy, Rev. W. W. Snell 



5 °° 
i oo 



CALIFORNIA— $274.73. 

Received by Rev. J. K. Harrison : 

Rev. J. Rowell 

Belmont, Mrs. E. S. Reid 

East Oakland, Pilgrim 

Guerneville 

Mill Valley 

Oakland, First 

Sattley 

Woman's Home Miss. Union, Mrs. J. 
M. Haven, Treas. : 

Alameda 

Oleander 

Pacific Grove 

San Francisco, First 

Sonoma 



Bloomington, by Rev. W. J. Speers.. 
Decoto, First, by Rev. E. D. Hale... 
Lakeview, by Rev. H. E. Merrill... . 
Los Alamitos, First, by Rev. J. F. 

Brown 

National City, First, by Rev. A. C. 

Dodd 

Pacific Grove, Mayflower Ch., by Rev. 

O. W. Lucas 



10 


00 


5 


CO 


30 


22 


5 


00 


3 


40 


64 


00 


2 


So 


3° 


00 


3 


IS 


4 


00 


62 


00 


6 


00 


> 2 5 


27 


1 


60 


2 


16 


3 


60 


10 


00 


3 


60 


6 


00 



WASHINGTON— $295.92. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. E. B. 
Burwell, Treas., by Rev. A. J. Bai- 
ley 250 00 

Coupeville, First, by Rev. C. E. New- 
berry 5 00 

Edison, by Rev. E. D. Farnsworth . . . 3 50 

Everett, by Rev. R. B. Hassell ' 10 00 

Hillyard, First, by Rev. F C. Krause. 7 00 

Roy, First, by Rev. L. W. Brintnall.. 6 37 
South Bend, First, by Rev. A. J. 

Smith 5 55 

Spokane, Swedish Ch., by Rev. J.J. 

Huleen 2 50 

Walla Walla, German Free Luth. Ch., 

by Rev. J. Hergert 6 00 

OREGON-$i8. 35 . 

Dora, by Rev. F. E. Scofield 2 00 

Hillsboro, by Rev. C. F. Clapp 16 35 

Unknown 22 50 

Anonymous ......' 22 50 

November Receipts: Contributions . .$20,311 72 

Legacies 26,154 50 

Interest 24 00 

Annuity 50000 

Home Mission- 
ary 18 20 

Literature 537 

$47.°i3 79 



DONATIONS OF CLOTHING, ETC. 



Received i 

Berkshire, N. Y. Ladies' Aid Soc, by 
Mrs. Julia Dwight. barrel $9362 

Cedar Rapids, la.. Woman's Miss. Soc. 
of First Ch., by Mrs. L. R. Munger, 
box 60 00 

Goshen, Conn., by Mrs. H. E. Small, 
box, barrel, and cash ' 108 04 

Hollis, N. H., Ladies' Reading and 
Charitable Soc, by Annie V. Colburn, 
box 5 7 07 

Lyme, N. H.. Ladies' Benev. Soc, by 
Mrs. Adna Chase, box and cash 120 00 

Meriden, Conn., Ladies' Aid Soc. of 



n September 

Center Ch., by Mrs. F. A. Augur, 

barrel $53 52 

Plymouth, Conn.. Ladies' Benev. Soc, 

by Mrs. E. B. Wells, barrel 135 00 

New Haven, Conn., Home Miss. Aux. 

of Second Ch., by Mrs. C. E. Bray, 

two barrels 102 81 

Sherburne, N. Y., Woman's Miss. Soc, 

by Mary C. Coats, box 78 88 

Wallingford, Conn., Ladies, by Esther 

A. Ballou, box 26 23 



$835 17 



Received in October 



Bloomfield, Conn., Ladies' Benev. Soc, 
byE. Bidwell, barrel $50 56 

Bridgewater, Mass., by Miss M. Porter, 
box 6 00 

East Jaffrey, N. H., Cheerful Helpers, 
by Miss Annie F. Crombie, box, 
freight, and check 5668 

East Orange, N. J., Trinity Ch., by 
Fannie S. Halsey, three barrels 229 37 

Kane, Penn., Woman's Miss. Soc, by 
Mrs. C. A. Jones, barrel 84 00 



Lincoln, Neb., First Ch., by Mrs. F. N. 
Gibson, box " 

Lockport, N. Y.. W. H. M.S. of First 
Ch.. by E. D. Woodward, box 

New Britain, Conn.. South Ch., by Har- 
riet M. Eastman, box 

North Ridgeville, Ohio. Ladies' Benev. 
Soc, by Mrs. John Stapleton. bar- 



Orford, N. H., by Mrs. Luther 
Whittemore, barrel and cash 



L. 



$50 92 



198 



The Home Missionary 



January, 1900 



Plainville, Conn , Ladies' Benev. Soc. 

and Home Miss. Soc., by C. E. Blakes- 

lee, barrel and freight $80 15 

Putnam, Conn., Second Ch., by Clara 

Williams, barrel 80 gi 

Saxton's River, Vt., Ladies' Soc, by 

Mrs. G. F. Chapin, barrel 20 00 

Suffield, Conn., Ladies' Aid Soc, by 

Mrs. Cornelia P. Newton, barrel and 

cash 1 54 00 

Takottville, Conn., L. H. M. S., by Mrs. 

F. R. Waite, barrel, and freight. 114 24 



Terryville, Conn., Daughters of the 
Covenant, by Mrs. E. G. Woodward, 

box $7175 

Toledo, Ohio, Central Ch., by Mrs. F. 

D. Kelsey, two barrels 120 oo 

Missionary Soc. of Washington St. 
Ch., by Mrs. L. E. Johnson, box, 

barrel, and package 140 00 

Torringford, Conn., Ladies' Sew Soc, 
by Mrs. W. L. Durand, box 56 65 



$1,630 25 



Received in Novembt 



Bennington Center, Vt., The Burden 
Bearers, by Miss Marion J. Vail, box 
and barrel $125 00 

Bethlehem, Conn., Ladies' Benev. Soc, 
by Mrs. E. K. Hayes, barrel. 60 00 

Black Rock, Conn., Ladies, by Sarah J. 
Bartram, barrel .... 82 00 

Bridgeport, Conn., Second Ch., by Mrs. 
G. L. Porter, two and one half bar- 
rels. 219 54 

Bristol, Conn., Home Miss. Aux. of 
First Ch.,by Mrs. A. E. North, bar- 
rel 78 00 

Brooklyn, N. Y., Ladies' Benev. Soc. of 
Central Ch., by Mrs. J. Simmons, 

five barrels 176 83 

Missionary Soc. of Lewis Ave. Ch., 
by Mrs. A. M. Price, box 163 87 

Canandaigua, N. Y., W. H. M. S. of 
First Ch., by Mrs. H. C. Parmele, 
three barrels 225 00 

Cedar Rapids, Iowa, W. M. S. of First 
Ch., by L. R. Munger, two boxes 30 75 

Chester, Conn., Ladies' Soc, by Mrs. 
Edwin G. Smith, barrel and cash ... 83 50 

Clifton Springs, N. Y., Mrs. Z. Eddy, . 
two packages. 

Davenporo. Iowa, L. H. M. S. of Ed- 
wards Ch., by Mrs. G. S. Rollins, 
box and barrel 135 00 

Dover, N. H., L. H. M. S. of First Ch., 
by Hannah Wyatt, barrel 97 44 

East Hampton, Conn., What so ever 
Circle of King's Daughters, by Mary 
B. Cone, barrel 25 00 

East Orange, N. J., First Ch., by Cath- 
erine K. Tompkins, two barrels and 
package 193 78 

Elmwood. Conn.. L. H. M. S., by Mrs. 
Roger N. Francis, barrel 63 90 

Fairport. N. Y., W. H. M. S., by L. W. 
Gould, box and barrel 70 25 

Galesburg, 111., VV. M. S. of Central Ch., 

by ?*Trs. E. N. Williams, barrel 35 00 

Green Mountain, la., L. M. S., by Mrs. 
E. C. Wetherbee, package 12 85 

Greenwich, Conn., Stillson Benev. Soc. 
of Second Ch., by Miss Amelia Mead, 
three barrels. 

Homer, N. Y., Ladies' Aid and Home 
Miss. Soc, by Mrs. L. H. Tuthill, 
barrel 51 91 

Keene. N. H., Home Miss. Soc. of First 
Ch., by Emma W. Richards, box and 

barrel no 53 

L. M. U. and Cent. Institution of 
Second Ch., by Mrs. C. H. Wallace, 
two barrels 85 00 

Maine, N. Y, W. H. M. S., by Mrs. L. 

E. Turner, box 75 00 

Manchester. N. H., Ladies' Benev. Asso. 
of Franklin St. Ch., by Mrs. E. M. 
Bryant, three barrels 240 00 



Meriden, Conn., L. B. S., C. E. S., and 

Guardian Soc. of First Ch.,by Miss 

Mary J. Benham, box $217 22 

Middletown, Conn., L. H. M. S., by Mrs. 

A. R. Crittenden, barrel 126 00 

Middletown Springs, Vt., Ladies, by 

Rev. Henry L. Bailey, barrel and cash 63 50 

Moline, 111., Ladies' Aid Soc. of First Ch., 

by Mrs. S. M. Atkinson, barrel 54 28 

Newbury, Vt., Mrs. A.E. Keyes. package. • 
New Haven, Conn., L. H. M. S. of First 

Ch.,byMaryE. Bennett, four boxes 617 70 

L. A. S. of United Ch., by Mrs. H. S. 

De Forest, two boxes 281 31 

Newington, Conn., Eunoean Soc, by 

Mary E. Belden. barrel 5205 

New York City, Forest Ave. Ch., by 

Mrs. E. D. Clark, barrel 11 25 

Norwich, Conn., W. H. M. S. of Park 

Ch., by Mrs. L. G. Lane, two boxes.. . 250 00 
Norwich, N. Y., Woman's Work Assoc 

of First Ch., by Mrs. Geo. Marr, 

barrel 50 co 

Oakville, Conn., L. A. S., by Ella L. 

Robinson, barrel 51 73 

Oberlin, O., Ladies' Soc. of Second Ch., 

by Miss Adell N. Royce, box and 

barrel 8300 

Orange, N. J., Orange Valley Ch., by 

Agnes L. Russell, box 250 00 

Oswego, N. Y., W. H. M. S., by Mrs. J. 

S. Drurv, barrel 60 00 

Peacham,Vt., L. H. M. S., by Mrs. E. C. 

Merrill, barrel and cash 6800 

Penacook, N. H., Ladies, by Mrs. M. 

Annie Fisk, barrel 2500 

Rockville, Conn., L. A. S. of Union Ch., 

by Mrs. H. K. Talcott. box 87 co 

Rootstown, O., L. A. S., by Mrs. H. L. 

Spelman, barrel 72 00 

St. Albans. Vt., W. H. M. S. of First 

Ch., by Minnie L. Hogan. box 297 75 

South Coventry, Conn., Ladies' Assoc, 

by Mrs. F. Tracy, barrel 46 1 1 

Southington, Conn., H. M. S., by Mrs. 

E. F. Cowles, barrel and cash f 3 90 

Y. P. S. C. E.,cash 5 00 

Junior End. Soc. , cash 1 oo 

South Manchester, Conn., L. B. S. of 

First Ch., by Antoinette B. Spencer, 

box 80 00 

Wellsville, N. Y., W. M. U. of First Ch., 

by Miss Emma A. Lawrence, box 86 94 

West Rutland, Vt., W. M. S., by Mrs. 

F. A. Morse, box 160 00 

Windham, O., First Ch., by Mrs. H. C. 

Tagger, box 49 60 

Woodbridge, Conn., L. B. S., by Mrs. 

Annie Thomas, box 5606 

Woodstock. Vt.,W. H. M. S. of First Ch., 

by Mrs. C. A. Munger, box. 

$5,702 88 



January, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



199 



AUXILIARY STATE RECEIPTS 



MASSACHUSETTS HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 



Receipts of the Massachusetts Home Missionary Society hi September, 1 899. 

B. Palmer, Treasurer 



Rev. Edwin 



Abington, First, by J. T. Richmond $11 01 

Amherst, Second, by Herbert Sabin 21 75 

Barnstable, Hyannis, by M. B. Eldridge 15 00 

West,. by Rev. E. B. French 5 00 

Barre, Sunday-school, by Mabel D. 

Hancock 13 09 

Billerica, North, Mrs. E. R. Gould, for 

C. H. M. S. debt 1200 

Boston, Charlestown, Winthrop, by Geo. 

S. Poole 83 28 

X 5 00 

Boxford, West, by Rev. C. H. Hub- 
bard 712 

Bridgewater, East, by Geo. M. Keith .. 5 30 
Charlemont, East, by Miss Angie Bal- 
lard 20 00 

Chesterfield, by Rev. H. E. Thygeson . 5 go 

Chicopee, First, S. S., by C. G. Chapin. 2 79 
Clinton, German Evan., by Rev. F. C. 

F. Scherff 761 

Conway, by Francis Howland ..... 17 S3 

Douglas, First, by Mrs. William Church 5 00 

Eastnampton, First, by W. H . Wright . 36 93 

Fitchburg, Rollstone, by David Lowe.. 27 40 

Granby, by Rev. R. C. Bell (addl.) 8 00 

Haile, S. W. Fund, Income of 6250 

(For reinvestment) 2,624 5 1 

Hale, E. J. M. Fund, Income of 25 00 

(For reinvestment) 1,045 8° 

Hubbardston, by Rev. M. H. Hitch- 
cock 41 00 

Kalamazoo, Mich., S. A. Gibson, Estate 

of , by F. M . Hodge 250 00 

Lowell, Highland, A Friend 6 00 

Lynn, Scandinavian Evangelistic, by 

John A. Nelson 5 00 



Medford, South, Union, by G. S. White- 
head $22 50 

Medway, West, Third, by Geo. W. Bul- 

lard 1750 

Middlefield, by Rev. H. A. Youtz 10 00 

New Hampshire H. M. Soc. for Arme- 
nian Service, $37.50.* 
Newton, Eliot, by G. N. "Putnam, for 

work of Rev. Dr. H. A. Schauffler . 25 00 

First (Center), by J. E. Rockwood . . . 116 90 
North Brookfield, First, by H. F. Moore 56 99 
Oxford, Woman's Miss. Society, by L. 

D. Stockwell 5 00 

Paxton, by Rev. G. W. Clark 11 25 

Petersham, by C. W. Gates 21 00 

Phillipston, by Mrs. M. P. Estey 4 00 

Plympton, by Edmund Perkins 3 00 

Reed, Dwight, Fund, Income of 270 00 

Taunton, East, bv. Geo. A. King 8 08 

Wakefield, by W.' P. Preston 24 67 

Walpole, Orth., by S. E. Bentley 18 50 

Wedding Gift 1000 

Westport, Pacific Union S. S., by J. C. 

Macomber 9 08 

Weymouth, South, Joint Collection from 
Union and O. South Churches, by H. 

B. Reed 26 75 

Whitin, J. C, Fund, Income of 2500 

Woman's H. M. Association, by Miss 
Lizzie D. White, Treas.: 
Grant to Pole Bible Reader, $60.* 



Home Missionary. 



,°53 84 
1 20 



Received in October, 1899 



Amherst, North, by E. H. Dickinson, to 
const. Louise Dickinson a L. M. of 

C. H. M. S $50 00 

Andover, Ballardvale, by Miss Lizzie M. 

Rowland 57 96 

South, by John Alden, towards Salary 
of Rev. R. B. Wright, Boise City, 

Idaho 100 00 

Attleboro, Second, by Miss H. E. Car- 
penter 153° 

Auburn, by Rev. C. M. Pierce 58 07 

Bernardston, Goodale Memorial, by H. 

L. Crowell 8 30 

Beverly, Dane St., by Chas. L. Odell. 210 00 

Billerica. by J. F. Bruce 17 67 

Blandford. Second, by Mrs. F. M. Bliss 2 50 

Boston, A Friend 25 00 

Allston, by Fred. B. Wheeler 25 00 

Jamaica Plain, Central, by F. A. Far- 

rar 240 11 

Park St., by Geo. M. Butler 25 00 

Roslindale, A Friend 50 

Roxbury, Eliot, by F. C. Russell 152 56 

Roxbury, Highlands, bv W. M. Rus- 
sell, for Rev. W. M. Wellman, Dar- 
lington, Ok 20 00 



Brackett, Fund, Income of 

Braintree, First, by A. H. Cobb ... 

Bridgewater, Central Sq., by Prof. A. 

G. Boyden 

Brockton, Campello, South, S. S., by L. 
T. Copeland 

Porter, by Chas. P. Holland 

Brookline, Harvard, by Tas. H. Shap- 

leigh 

For Italian Mission 

Leyden, by Geo. E. Adams 

Cambridge, Pilgrim, by N. H. Hol- 

brook 

Dartmouth, South, by E. B. Sturtevant 

Edgartown, by Mrs. Wm. Pent 

Essex, by Mrs. Mary C. Osgood 

Fall River, French Evang., by Rev. S. 

P. Rondeau 

Falmouth, First, by Obed. F. Hitch 

Framingham, South, Grace, by G. M. 

Amsden 

Franklin, by J. Herbert Baker 

Greenfield, Second, by Miss Ida A. 

Crosby 

Groveland, by Miss M. A. Burbank 

Gurney, R. C, Fund, Income 



31 60 



II 


65 


50 


00 


66 


81 


20 
181 


04 

64 


10 


IS 


5 


00 


12 


00 


IS 


24 


25 


00 


41 


31 


100 


00 


21 


82 


87 
8 


79 
00 


28 


00 



* Received and credited on special account. 



200 



The Home Missionary 



January, 1900 



Hale, E. J. M., Fund, Income §30 00 

Hanover, Second, by A. M. Barstow ... 2 94 

Hawley, by Tyler T. Clark 1 37 

West, by C. C. Fuller, Taft thank- 
offering 8 75 

Ipswich, First, by Miss Lucy R. Farley 50 00 
Leominster, North, Church, $12.50 ; C. 

E. Soc, $2, by Miss Lucy E. Shedd.. 14 50 
Leverett, Moore's Corner, by Rev. J. C. 

Wightman 7 00 

Longmeadow, Benev. Assoc, by L. C. 

Fay . 142 21 

Lowell, High St., by G. H. Candee 155 n 

Lynn, Central, by Rev. A. W. Moore, 

Special for Rev. G. H. Adalian 5 00 

Mansfield, by S. E. Scholes 33 00 

Massachusetts 1 00 

Newburyport, Rev. John W. Dodge 50 00 

Mrs. Sophia C. Hale, Thank-offering.. 100 00 

Newton. Eliot, by Geo. N. Putnam 250 00 

Northbridge, Whitinsville, C. E. Soc, 

by Rev. J. R. Thurston (for Alaska) 43 56 

E. C. a Day Band, by Mrs. C. E. 

Whitin 1807 

Phillipston, Taft thank-offering, by 

Rev. P. R. Crowell 3 25 

Plymouth, Manomet, by Mrs. David 

Clark 9 00 

Pilgrimage, Sunday Supply of Sec. 

Coit, by C. F. Cole 15 00 

Plympton, Silver Lake, C. E. Soc, by 

Mabel T. Bryant 2 77 

Reading, by Dean Peabody 15 00 

Reed, Dwight, Fund, Income of 60 00 

Rockland, by Rev. W. G. Puddefoot... 25 05 

Rollins Fund, Income of 20 00 

Salem, Tabernacle, by C. R. Washburn 17 19 

Saugus, by John E. Stocker 30 30 

Southbridge, Globe Village, Evan. Free, 

by F. E. Randall 31 14 

Somerville, First, by A. L. Cole 7 46 

Springfield, First, by F. A. Latimer, Jr. 100 86 

Miss Lilla M. Harmon 500 

Hope, by Jas. B. Keene 71 33 



North, C. E. Soc, by Annie L. Towne $2 00 

Olivet, by J. W. Nourbourn 21 41 

Sudbury, South, Memorial, by L. F. 

Richardson 15 50 

Wall, Fund. Income of 32 00 

Walpole, A Friend 2 00 

"G" 2500 

Wenham, C. E. Soc, by Mrs. Frances 

E. Perkins 4 00 

West Brookfield, S. S. Home Dept 9 00 

Miss Mary Foster's Class. . . 3 00. 

West Tisbury, by Ulysses E. Mayhew.. 59 26 

Weymouth, North Pilgrim, by S. G. 

Rockwood 18 60 

South, Union, by H. B. Reed 5 00 

Whitcomb, David, Fund, Income cf 150 co 

Whitin, J. C. Fund, Income of 337 50 

Wilmington, by C. W. Clark 555 

S.S., by C. W. Clark. ...: 836 

Winchendon, First, by Mrs. C. J. Rice. 25 00 

Winchester, First, for work among for- 
eign population, by H. A. Wheeler, 

$150.* 
Woburn, Montvale, by K. M. Thoresen 24 00 

Worcester, Piedmont, by Arthur W. 

Eldred 67 39 

Plymouth, by F. W. Chase 45 68 

Union, by T. H. Reed 49 34 

Yarmouth, West, by Miss Abbie B. 

Crowell 6 00 

Woman's Home Missionary Association, 
by Miss Lizzie D. White. Treas.: 

Grant for Polish Bible Reader, Miss 
J. Junek, $30.00.* 

Boston, Rox., Wal. Ave. Aux.. towards 
Salary of Rev. Samuel Deakin 31 00 

Greenwich Auxiliary, for Salary Fund 22 00 



Home Missionary 



,111 58 



Received in November \ 1899 



Amesbury, Union, by John T. Bassett. . 

Andover, Chapel, by W. F. Draper, to 

const. Prof. C. C. Torrey, Margaret 

K. Hall, Elizabeth Clough,and Mrs. 

Mary A. Tobey L. Ms. of C. H. 

M. Soc 

South, S. S., by C. H. Gilbert, for 
Greek work, J20.ro.* 
Attleboro, Second, by David L. Low. . . 

Bank Balances, Quarterly Int. on 

Blackstone, Ch., $10 : S. S., $2 ; C. E. 
Soc, $3 ; Jun. C. E. Soc, $5, by C. H. 

Lee 

Boston, Central, by John A. Bennett . . . 

Dorchester, Second. A Member 

Jam. Plain, Central, by F. A. Farrar. 
Mt. Vernon, additional, by Mrs. C. A. 

Jellison 

A Friend 

Norwegian, Evangelistic, by S. Clem- 
ents 

Old South, by Joseph H. Gray 

Roxbury. Immanuel, Ch. and S. S., by 
F. J. Ward, special for Rev. W. M. 

Wellman 

Brackett Fund, Income of 

Braintree, South, by H. B. Whitman .. 
Weymouth and Braintree Union, by 

E. H. Bowles (addl.) 

Cohasset. Beech wood, by Miss Ella M. 

Bates, Taft thank-offering 

Cummington, West, Ladies 1 Miss. Soc, 
by Mrs. Sarah M. Sears 



$10 



145 


60 


71 


5° 


20 


00 


520 


41 


20 


00 


15 


81 



5 
2,253 



Dunstable, Wilson, Miss Joanna, Estate 
of, by Miss Lettie Wilson 

Fitchburg, Rollstone. by David Lowe.. 

Foxboro, Bethany, by Horace Carpenter 

Framingham, South, Kendall, Amanda 

M., Estate of, by E. E. Stiles, Adm'r. 

Kendall, Susan, Memorial gitt, by E. 

E. Stiles, Adm'r, Est. of A. M. K.. 

Frost, Rufus S., fund. Income of 

Gurney, R. C, fund. Income of 

Hale, E. J. M .. fund, Income of 

Hamilton, by Joseph P. Lovering 

Hardwick, Gilbertville, by A. H. Rich- 
ardson, to const. Robert Russell and 
Mrs. Robert Watson L. Ms. of C. H. 
M. Soc 

Haverhill, Ward Hill, Chadwick, G. G., 

by Rev. C. Clark 

West, S. S., Harvest Festival, by H. A. 
Poore, to const. Mrs. A. Josephine 
Webster L. M. of C. H. M. Soc... 

Hinsdale, by M. M. Wentworth 

Holliston, First, by W. P. Gage 

Holyoke, Second, by J. N. Hubbard . . 

Lancaster, Ladies' Benev. Soc, by Har- 
riet A. Keyes 

Lawrence, South, by Dea. J. Y. Buzzell 

Manchester, C. E. Soc, by Anna S. Rust, 
for Alaskan work 

Medford, Mystic, by Jas. McPherson. . . 
South, Union, by Geo. S. Whitehead. 

Merrimac, by F. O. Davis 

Millbury, Second, by A. Armsby 



ZOO 

24 

IS 


(. 
65 
7 1 


380 


00 


371 
24 
12 


36 
00 

00 


20 


00 


37 


5° 


133 


46 


5 


00 


5° 
70 

49 
154 


00 
00 

32 
92 


IO 


00 


I 


57 


10 

21S 
20 
18 
56 


00 

77 
00 

89 

OS 



* Received and entered on special account. 



January, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



201 



Montague, Turners Falls, by Jason S. 

Brown $19 83 

Newton, Eliot, S. S., by Geo. R. Mc- 

Farlin 5268 

Plainfield, by S. W. Clark 4 91 

Plympton, C. E. Soc, by Grace S. 

Churchill 2 60 

Reed, Dwight, fund, Income of 30 00 

Richmond, by C. H. Dorr 1296 

Rollins fund, Income of 20 00 

Rowley, C. E. Soc, by E. Mabel Adams 5 00 

South Hadley, First, by L. M. Gaylord 18 00 

Southwick, by F. M. Arnold 6 50 

Springfield, Carey, Harvey T., Estate 

of, on account, by Ralph W. Ellis.. 10,000 00 

North, Ladies' Miss. Soc, by Miss H. 

M. Towne 550 

Taunton, East, by Rev. H. H. Loud 3 00 



Westhampton, by E. B. Clapp $29 14 

West Springfield, First, by Addison H. 

Smith 875 

Whitcomb, David, fund, Income of 280 00 

Williamsburg, Cook, S. M 20 00 

Worcester, Covenant, by Ella J. Emer- 
son 3 00 

Woman's Home Missionary Association, 
by Miss L. D. White, Treas.: 
Grant towards salary of Mrs. I. N. Til- 

linghast of Fr. Am. Coll., $200.00. . . 200 00 
Grant to Polish Bible Reader, Miss J. 
Junek, $30.00.* 



Home Missionary. 



$16,135 29 

2 55 

$16,137 84 



THE MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF CONNECTICUT 

Contributions for the month of September, iSgg. Ward W. Jacobs, Treasurer, 

Hartford 



Canton, Collinsville, by J. S. Heath .... 

Coventry, Second, by Andrew Kings- 
bury 

Danbury, Swedish, by J. W. Ericson... 

Haddam, First, by Rev. E. E. Lewis... 

Hamden, Mt. Carmel, by L. A. Dicker- 
man 

Mt. Carmel, by L. A. Dickerman 
forC. H. M. S 

Hartford, Warburton Chapel S. S. by J. 
Coolidge Hills . 

Lebanon, First, by Milss Julia R. Max- 
well 

Litchfield, Milton, by Rev. W. E. Page 

Marlboro, by Emma C. Lord 

Morris, by S. A. Whittlesey 

Naugatuck, Swedish, by August J. 
Lindquist 

North Branford, by Rev. Charles Page. 

North Canaan, East, by A. B. Garfield. 
Pilgrim, by J. B. Reed 



42 


00 


s 


17 


12 


00 


iS 


61 


14 


26 


s 


21 


18 


62 


II 


OS 


2 


83 


14 


OO 


5 


OO 


24 


18 


6 


40 


23 


&3 



South Windsor, Wapping, by Wm. A. 
Howe $16 14 

Stamford, North Stamford, by Wm. B. 
Weed 10 00 

Suffield, West Suffield, by Benj. Shel- 
don 21 88 

Thomaston, First, by H. A. Welton, for 
C.H. M. S 11 52 

Woodstock, Swedish, by Rev. Carl E. 

Carlson 4 70 

W. C. H. M. U. of Conn., Mrs. Geo. 
Follett, Secretary, Hartford, First, 
by Mrs. F. B. Cooley 25 00 

$299 20 

Missionary Society of Connecticut $273 42 

Congregational Home Missionary So- 
ciety 25 78 



Received in October, li 



Ashford, by Miss Mary Ann Loomis, 

Persona] 

Westford, by E. L. Whiton 

Barkhamsted, Riverton, by D. F. Ran- 
som 

Bristol, Swedish, by Rev. H. Palmer... 

Chaplin, by Frank C. Lummis, for C. 
H. M.S 

Chester, by E. C. Hungerford, for C. 
H. M. S 

Clinton, by Ezra E. Post 

Coventry, Second, by Andrew Kings- 
bury 

East Haven, Foxon, by Rev. Charles 
Page 

East Lyme, Niantic, by Rev. F. A. 
Fuller 

Greenwich. Second, by Dr. E. N. Judd. 

Hartford, Danish, by Niels Jensen 

Killingly, South Killingly, by Charles 
T. Preston 

Lyme, Grassy Hill, by J. Ely Beebe ... 

Madison, First, " Ladies' Cent Society," 
by Mrs. John S. Hoyt 



$1 


00 


s 


00 


7 


00 


4 


00 


19 


00 


13 
32 


80 
85 


4 


S3 


S 


25 


8 


82 


34 
7 


18 
64 


S 


OO 


IS 


13 



Middletown, First, by E. P. Augur 

New London, First, by P. LeRoy Har- 
wood 

Oxford, by Rev. G. L. Shaeffer 

Putnam, Second, by E. M. Corbin 

Thomaston, Swedish, by Aug. Carlson. 

Torrington, Swedish, by Peter Svan- 
son 

Voluntown, Ekonk, by Rev. John El- 
derkin. Personal, together with pre- 
vious contributions to constitute John 
R. Elderkin a L. M 

Windsor, Locks, by C . A . Porter 

Woodbury, North Woodbury, by 
George F. Morris 



$24 60 

25 29 

16 85 

2 so 

4 IS 

1 5° 



8 00 
73 01 

64 00 

416 95 



Missionary Society of Connecticut $384 15 

Congregational Home Missionary So- 
ciety 32 80 



33 85 



*!6 95 



* Received and credited on special account. 



202 



The Home Missionary January, 1900 

Contributions for month of November, 1899 



Bridgeport. Park Street, by Adna S. Hall $53 80 

Bethany Mission, by Rev. W. F.White 6 00 

Swedish, by Martin Moller 175 

Canterbury, by Rev. Wilbur Johnson.. 10 cm 

Chaplin, by Frank C. Lummis 13 50 

Colebrook, by Rev. Benjamin A. Dean. 14 26 

Eastford, by Henry Trowbridge 9 00 

East Haddam, First, by Eugene W. 

Chaffee 10 36 

ForC.H.M.S 19 41 

Farniington, First, by Richard H. Gay. 55 50 

Franklin, by Rev. H. E. Hart 2 ix> 

Georgetown, Swedish, by Rev. A. A. 

Nordlund 4 00 

Haddam Neck, by Rev. G. B. Fuller. .. 10 00 

Hanover, by Rev. L. H. Higgins 10 33 

Hartford, First, by C. T. Welles 93 77 

For C. H. M. S 77 29 

Fourth, by F. W. Hawley 415 

Asylum Hill, Rev. W. H. Moore, per- 
sonal 20 00 

Litchfield, First, by Miss C. B. Kenney 52 00 

Meriden, Center, by W. F. Smith 25 00 

Middlefield, by Rev. John Allender ... 67 60 

Middletown, First, by E. P. Augur 26 38 

South, by G. A. Craig 3125 

Nepaug, Y. P. S. C. E., by Mrs. A. E. 

Wright 500 



New Fairfield, by George M. Nevius. . . $5 44 
New Haven, Davenport, forC. H. M. S., 

by G. F. Burgess 53 66 

New London, Second, by F. N. Braman 250 00 

Norwich, Broadway, by F. J. Leavens. 410 6s 
Old Saybrook, for C. H. M. S., by Robert 

Chapman IT 7 g 

Plantsville, by E. P. Hotchkiss 20 96 

Preston, by H. H. Palmer 18 00 

Ridgefield, by John F. Holmes "45 

Shelton, by J. Tomlinson 5656 

Southport, by Mrs. Henry T. Bulkeley. 42 00 
Stamford, Long Ridge, Y. P. S. C. E., 

by Rev. C. J. Moon 5 00 

Stratford, by Horace H. Judson 5 50 

Thomaston, First, for C. H. M. S., by 

H. A. Welton 9 43 

West Avon, by E. H. Woodford n 17 

West Hartland, by Miss Julia E. Wilcox 5 00 
Winchester, Y. P. S. C. E., for C. H. M. 

S., by Stuart R. Bronson . 1 3 g 

$i.54° 35 

Missionary Society of Conn $1,367 38 

Congregational Home Missionary Soc. . 172 97 

$i,54° 35 



MICHIGAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

Receipts of the Michigan Home Missionary Society in September, 1S99. Rev. John P. 

Sanderson, Treasurer 



Bass River $2 15 

Detroit, First 100 00 

Lake Linden 76 00 

Manistee, Y. P. S. C. E 10 00 

Maple City 1 09 

Merrill 5 50 

Solon 3 37 

Traverse City, Y. P. S. C. E 10 00 

W. H. M. U. per Mrs. E. F. Grabill, 

Treas 114 20 



Receipts of W. H. M. U. of Michigan 
in September, by Mrs. E. F. Gra- 
bill, Treas. : 



SENIOR FUND 



Allegan, W. M. S 

Bronson, W. H. M. U 

Detroit, First, W. A 

Fort Street, L. A. S., H. M. Com. 



322 31 



§6 26 
g 00 

20 00 
2 50 



Dundee, W. H. M. S $1000 

Ellsworth, W. H. M. S 120 

Grass Lake, W. H. M. S 10 00 

Greenville, W. H. M. S 1 00 

Lowell, W. H. M. S 5 00 

Muskegon, W. M. S 1500 

Olivet, L. B. S 30 00 

St. Joseph, W. M. S 8 00 

Stockbridge, Mrs. E. W. Woodward.. 5 00 

Traverse Citv, W. H. M. S ■; 00 

Wheatland, W. H. M. S 2700 

$154 96 

YOUNG PEOPLE'S FUND 



Ann Arbor, Y. P. S. C. E.. . 

Clio, Tun 

Owosso, Y. P. S. C. E 



$2 50 
1 00 
4 00 



$162 46 



Receipts for October, 1S99 



Ann Arbor $25 00 

Atlanta 1 00 

Bangor, Y. P. S. C. E 215 

Big Rock 1 00 

Calumet 109 88 

Charlotte 20 00 

Clarksville 10 25 

Clinton 25 00 

Clio 400 

Detroit, First 100 00 

Brewster S. S 825 

Polish 10 00 

Boulevard 10 00 



East Gilead 

East Fulton 

East Paris 

Flat Rock 

Galesburg. Y. P. S. C. E. 

Garden 

Hart 

Lamont 

Lansing. Plymouth 

Mattawan 

Mattison 

Nunica 

Sandstone 



$2 03 
2 71 
5 °° 
1 35 

10 50 

15 era 

16 36 
7 00 

47 00 

5 °° 

94 



January, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



203 



Somerset $7 12 

Stanton 36 25 

Vanderbilt 1 42 

Vermontville 414 

Vienna 1 50 

Wheatland 13 64 

S. S 5 59 

Y. P. S. C. E 5 00 

Interest on permanent funds 125 00 

Ionia church property 2 00 

W. H. M. U. per Mrs. E. F. Grabill, 

Treas 495 94 



fri.150 43 



Receipts of W. H. M. U. of Michigan 
for October, 1899, by Mrs. E. Gra- 
bill, Treas.: 

SENIOR FUND 

Charlotte, L. B. S $25 00 

Cheboygan, W. H. M. U 19 00 

Chelsea, W. M. S 8 50 

Clinton, W. M. S 24 00 

Coloma, W. M. S 5 00 

Cooper, W. M.S.. 3 00 

Covert, W. M. S 10 00 

Detroit, Woodward Ave., W. U 43 75 

Dorr, W. M. S 500 

Grand Blanc, W. M. S 12 27 

Grand Rapids, Smith Mem. W. M. S. 2 00 

Grass Lake, W. H. M. S 15 00 

Greenville, W. H. M. S 3 00 

Hancock, W. M. S 22 20 

Hudson, W. M. S 9 00 



Interest on bonds and notes $270 59 

Jackson, First, W. H. M. S 27 15 

Kalamazoo, W. H. M. U., of which 

$14.59 is thank-offering 25 49 

Lansing, Plymouth, W. H. M. S 13 20 

Manistee, W.H.M.S 50 00 

Morenci, W. M. S 500 

Muskegon, First, W. M. S 500 

Ovid, Gen'l Miss. Soc. 400 

Pontiac, W. M. S 600 

Ransom, W. M. S s 00 

Red Jacket, W. M. S 8 15 

Salem, Second, W. H. M. S 9 60 

South Haven, W. M. S 34 00 

Union City, W. H. M. U 6 55 

Vermontville, W. H. M. S 2 17 

Victor, W. H. M. S 4 00 



YOUNG PEOPLE'S FUND 

Cooper, Jun. C. E. S 

Dorr, Y. L. M. S 

Essexville, S. S 

Greenville, Juv. Miss. Band 

Hart, Y. P. S. C. E 

Kalamo, S. S. class of little ones, 3 to 
5 years old, of whom a few with one 
cent given to each earned 

Owosso, Jun. C. E. S 

Pontiac, Y. P. S. C. E 

Traverse City, Jun. C. E. Soc 

Total Receipts 



$682 


62 


$1 


00 


s 


00 




67 


I 


3° 


2 


5° 




3S 


2 


5° 


I 


5° 


3 


15 


$17 97 


$700 


59 



Receipts for November, 1899 



Ada, First $3 11 

Second 207 

Belford 1 60 

Benzonia 25 90 

Bradley 3 00 

Detroit, First 100 00 

Woodward Ave 51 01 

Canfield Ave 10 od 

Dexter, Dea. Dennis Warner 50 00 

Eastlake 16 £0 

Farwell 1000 

Fremont 1230 

Hart 11 10 

Kendall 5 50 

Lake Odessa .... 2 50 

Lansing, Plymouth 58 67 

Y. P. S. C. E 5 00 

S. S 7 09 

Merrill 4 65 

Northport, Jr. Y. P. S. C. E 1 00 

Port Huron, First 33 45 

Prattville 7 00 

Rapid River 6 00 

Rodney 5 00 

Salem, First 12 00 

Thompsonville 2 50 

Union City, Y. P. S. C. E 10 00 

Wayland 195 

Whittaker 650 

W. H. M. U., by Mrs. E. F. Grabill, 

Treas 431 71 



41 



Receipts of W. H. M. U. of Michigan 
for November, 1899, Mrs. E. F. 
Grabill, Treas. : 

SENIORS. 

Allegan, W. M. S. Thank-offering 

Pledges 

Alpena, W. H. M. U 

Armada, W. Cong'l Aid Soc. . . 

Ceresco, W. M. S 

Charlevoix, W. M. S 

Constantine, W. H. M. S 

Cooper, W. M. S 

Detroit, Brewster L. H. M. S. . 

Dundee, W. M. S 

Grand Rapids, South, W. M. S. 

Greenville, W. H. M. S 

Ludington, W. H. M. S 

Oakwood, W. M. S 

Oxford, W. Ass'n 

Portland, W. M. S 

Reed City, W. M. U 

Sandstone, W. H. M. S 

Three Oaks, W. M. S 

Whittaker, W. H. M. S 



YOUNG PEOPLE S FUND. 

Laingsburg, Y. P. S. C. E 

Memphis, S. S., Infant M. Band 
Oxford, Children's Miss. Band. 

Portland, Junior C. E. S . 

Watervliet, Y. P. S. C. E 



B>b 43 
4 5o 



10 


93 


25 
25 




00 


5 
1 




75 


5 


90 


3 


00 


22 


5° 


9 


5° 


11 


5° 


7 


20 


22 


r.5 


1 


70 


3 
5 


35 
00 


12 


SO 




64 

15 


7 


5 


00 



5185 77 



75 
2 25 
10 00 

$14 50 



J200 27 



204 



The Home Missionary 



January, 1900 



WOMAN'S STATE HOME MISSIONARY 
ORGANIZATIONS 



OFFICERS 



I. NEW HAMPSHIRE 

FEMALE CENT INSTITUTION 

Organized August, 1804 

and 

HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized June, i8go 

President, Mrs. W. D. Knapp, Sotnersworth. 

Secretary, Mrs. M. W. Nims, 3 Liberty St., Con- 
cord. 

Treasurer, Miss Annie A. McFarland, 196 No. 
Main St., Concord. 



5. MAINE 



WOMAN'S MISSIONARY AUXILIARY 

Organized June, 1880 

President, Mrs. Katherine B. Lewis, So. Berwick. 
Secretary, Mrs. Gertrude H. Denio, 168 Ham- 
mond St., Bangor. 
Treasurer, Mrs. Rose M. Crosby, 64 Grove St., 



6. MICHIGAN 



2. MINNESOTA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized September, 1872 

President, Miss Catherine W. Nichols, 230 E. gth 

St., St. Paul. 
Secretary, Mrs. E. R. Shepard, 2931 Portland Ave., 

Minneapolis. 
Treasurer, Mrs. M. W. Skinner, Northfield. 



WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 
Organized May, 1881 

President, Mrs. I. P. Powell, 76 Jefferson Ave., 

Grand Rapids. 
Secretary, Mrs. E. N. Thorne, 212 So. Union St., 

Grand Rapids. 
Treasurer, Mrs. E. F. Grabill, Greenville. 



3. ALABAMA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized March, 1877 

Reorganized April, 1889 

/'resident. Airs. G. W. Andrews, Talladega. 
Secretary , Mrs. J. S. Jackson. Montgomery. 
Treasurer, Mrs. E. C. Silsby, Talladega. 



7. KANSAS 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1881 

President, Mrs. R. B. Guild, 1336 Dillon St., 

Topeka. 
Secretary, Mrs. M. H. Jaquith, 1157 Filmore St., 

Topeka. 
Treasurer, Miss May Wilkinson, Ottawa. 



4. MASSACHUSETTS AND RHODE 
ISLAND * 



8. OHIO 



WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY ASSOCIA- WOM AN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 
TION 

Organized February, 1880 Organized May, 1882 

President, Mrs. C L. Goodell. 607 Congregational President, Mrs C. W. Carroll, 48 Brookfield St., 

House. Boston. Cleveland. 

Secretary, Mrs Louise A. Kellogg. 607 Congrega- Secretary, Mrs. A H. Williams, 227 Princeton St., 

tional House. Boston. Cleveland. 

Treasurer, Miss Lizzie D. White, 607 Congrega- Treasurer, Mrs. George B. Brown, 2116 Warren 

tional House, Boston. St., Toledo. 

* While the W. H. M. A. appears in the above list as a State body for Massachusetts and Rhode 
Island, it has certain auxiliaries elsewhere. 



January, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



205 



9. NEW YORK 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1883 

President, Mrs. Wm. Kincaid, 483 Greene Ave., 

Brooklyn. 
Secretary, Mrs. Wm. Spalding, 513 Orange St., 

Syracuse. 
Treasurer, Mrs. J. J. Pearsall, 153 Decatur St., 

Brooklyn. 



15. CONNECTICUT 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UN lN 

Organized January, 1885 

President, Miss Ellen R. Camp, 9 Camp St., New 

Britain. 
Secretary, Mrs. C. T. Millard, 36 Lewis St., 

Hartford. 
Treasurer, Miss Anne W. Moore, 15 Columbia St. 

Hartford. 



10. WISCONSIN 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1883 

President, Mrs. E. G. Updike, Madison. 
Secretary, Mrs. A. O. Wright, Madison. 
Treasurer, Mrs. L. E. Smith, Madison. 

11. NORTH DAKOTA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized November, 1883 

President, Mrs. E. H. Stickney, Fargo. 
Secretary, Mrs. Silas Daggett, Harwood. 
Treasurer, Mrs. J. M. Fisher, Fargo. 

12. OREGON 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized July, 1884 

President, Mrs. F. Eggert. The Hill, Portland. 
Cor. Sec, Mrs. D. D. Clarke, 447 E. 12th St., No. 

Portland. 
Treasurer, Mrs. C. F. Clapp, Forest Grove. 

13. WASHINGTON 

Including Northern Idaho 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized July, 1884 

Reorganized June, 1889 

President, Mrs. A. ludson Bailey, 805 First Ave., 

West, Seattle. 
Secretary, Mrs. W. C. Wheeler, 424 South K St., 

Tacoma. 
Treasurer, Mrs. E. B. Burwell, 323 Seventh Ave., 

Seattle. 

14. SOUTH DAKOTA 
WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized September, 1884 
President, - 



Secretary, Mrs. K. M. Jenney, Huron. 
Treasurer , Mrs. F. M. Wilcox, Huron. 



16. MISSOURI 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1885 

President, Mrs. C. H. Patton, 3707 Westminster 

Place, St. Louis. 
Secretary, Mrs. C. W. S. Cobb, 4415 W. Morgan 

St., St. Louis. 
Treasurer, Mrs. A. J. Steele, 2825 Washington 

Ave., St. Louis. 



17. ILLINOIS 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1885 

President, Mrs. Sydney Strong, 234 N. Elmwood 

Ave., Oak Park. 
Secretary, Mrs. A. O. Whitcomb, 463 Irving 

Ave., Chicago. 
Treasurer, Mrs. Mary S. Booth, 30 S. Wood St., 

Chicago. 



18. IOWA 
WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized June, 1886 

President, 

Secretary, Mrs. H. H. Robbins, Grinnell. 
Treasurer, Miss Belle L. Bentley, W. Grand Ave., 

Des Moines. 



19. CALIFORNIA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

Organized June, 1887 

President, Mrs. E. S. Williams, Saratoga. 

Secretary, Mrs. F. B. Perkins, 546 24th St., Oak- 
land. 

Treasurer, Mrs. J. M. Haven, 1329 Harrison St., 
Oakland. 



20. NEBRASKA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized November, 1887 

President, Mrs. D. B. Perry, Crete. 
Secretary, Mrs. H. Bross, 2Q04 Q Street, Lincoln. 
Treasurer, Mrs. Charlotte C. Hall, 1318 C St., 
Lincoln. 



206 



The Home Missionary 



January, 1900 



ax. FLORIDA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized February, 1888 

President, Mrs. S. F. Gale, Jacksonville. 
Secretary, Mrs. W. H. Edmondson, Daytona. 
Treasurer, Mrf W. D. Brown, Interlachen. 

22. INDIANA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1888 

President, Mrs. W. A. Bell, 1211 Broadway, In- 
dianapolis. 

Secretary, Mrs. J. E. Hall, Alexandria. 

Treasurer, Mrs. Anna D. Davis, 1608 Bellefon- 
taine St., Indianapolis. 

23. SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 
WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 
Organized May, 1888 

President, Mrs. Warren F. Day, 949 So. Hill St., 

Los Angeles. 
Secretary, Mrs. Kate G. Robertson, Mentone. 
Treasurer, Mrs. Mary M. Smith, Public Library, 

Riverside. 

24. VERMONT 
WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized June, 1888 

President, Mrs. Rebecca P. Fairbanks, St. Johns- 
bury. 

Secretary, Mrs. C. L. Smith, 159 Pine St., Bur- 
lington. 

Treasurer, Mrs. Robert MacKinnon, St. Johns- 
bury. 



25. COLORADO 
WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 
Organized October, 1888 

Hon. Pres., Mrs. J. W. Pickett, Whitewater. 

President, Mrs. E. R. Drake, 18 Mack Block, 
Denver. 

Secretary, Mrs. Addison Blanchard, 3023 Down- 
ing Ave., Denver. 

Treasurer, Mrs. B. C. Valentine, Highlands. 



27. GEORGIA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized November, 1888 

New Organization October, 1898 

President, Miss M. L. Graham, Savannah. 
Secretary, Miss Jennie Curtis, Mcintosh. 
Treasurer, Miss Mattie Turner, Athens. 



28. MISSISSIPPI 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized April, 1889 

President, Mrs. C. L. Harris, 1421 31st Ave., Me- 
ridian. 

Secretary, 

Treasiirer, Mrs. L. H. Turner, 3112 12th St., Me- 
ridian. 



2g. LOUISIANA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized April, 1889 

President, Mrs. L. St. J. Hitchcock, 2436 Canal St., 

New Orleans. 
Secretary, Mrs. Matilda Cabrere, 2419 Conti St., 

New Orleans. 
Treasurer, Miss Mary L. Rogers, 2436 Canal St., 

New Orleans. 



30. ARKANSAS, KENTUCKY, AND TEN- 
NESSEE 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION OF THE 
CENTRAL SOUTH ASSOCIATION 

Organized April, 1889 

President, Mrs. Ella S. Moore, Box 8, Fisk Uni- 
versity, Nashville. Tenn. 

Secretary, Miss Mary L. Corpier, Florence, Ala. 

Treasurer, Mrs. Preston Burrus, 815 Cedar St., 
Nashville. 



31. NORTH CAROLINA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1889 

President, Mrs. 0. Faduma, Troy. 
Seer eta ry \ 

and VMiss A. E. Farrington, Talladega, 
Treasurer, ) Ala. 



26. WYOMING 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1888 

Reorganized December, 1892 

President, Mrs. J. A. Raner, Cheyenne. 
Secretary, Mrs. W. L. Whipple. Cheyenne. 
Treasurer, Mrs. A. E. Kevan, Rock Springs. 



32. TEXAS 
WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized March, 1890 

President, Mrs. Eunice Heflin, Sherman. 
Secretary, Mrs. Donald Hinkley, Dallas. 
Treasurer, Mrs. A. Geen, Dallas. 



January, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



207 



33. MONTANA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1890 

President, Mrs. V. F. Clark, Livingston. 
Secretary i 

and VMrs. W. S. Bell, 611 Spruce St., 
Treasurer \ Helena. 



38. INDIAN TERRITORY 
WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized April, 1892 

President, 

Secretary, Miss Louise Graper, Vinita. 
Treasurer, Mrs. Raymond, Vinita. 



34. PENNSYLVANIA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized June, 1890 

President, Mrs. C. F. Yennie, Wilcox. 
Secretary, Mrs. C. A. Waid, Ridgway. 
Treasurer, Mrs. D. Howells, Kane. 



35. OKLAHOMA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1890 

President, Mrs. J. H. Parker, Kingfisher. 
Secretary, Mrs. Joel Harper, Oklahoma City. 
Treastirer, Mrs. A. B. Hammer, Oklahoma City. 



36. NEW JERSEY 

Including District of Columbia, Maryland, 
and Virginia 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION OF 
THE NEW JERSEY ASSOCIATION 

Organized March, 1891 

President, Mrs. Isaac Clark, cor. Fourth and Col- 
lege Sts., N. W., Washington, D. C. 

Secretary, Miss Julia M. Pond, 607 T St., N. E., 
Washington, D. C. 

Treasurer, Mrs. J. H. Denison, 150 Belleville Ave., 
Newark. 



39. NEVADA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1892 

President, Mrs. L. J. Flint, Reno. 
Secretary, Miss Margaret N. Magill, Reno. 
Treasurer, Miss Mary Clow, Reno. 



40. NEW MEXICO 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized November, 1892 

President, Mrs. E. H. Ashmun, Albuquerque. 
Secretary, Mrs. F. A. Burlingame, Albuquerque. 
Treasurer, Mrs. M. McClaskey, Albuquerque. 



41. BLACK HILLS, SO. DAKOTA 

BLACK HILLS WOMAN'S MISSIONARY 

UNION 

Organized October, 1893 

President, Mrs. J. B. Gossage, Rapid City. 
Secretary, Mrs. C. W. Barron, Rapid City. 
Treasurer, Mrs. E. L. Billings, Lead. 



37. UTAH 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1891 

Reorganized December, 1892 

President, Mrs. Hemphill, 67 J St., Salt Lake City. 
Secretary, Mrs. L. E. Hall, 78 East First North 

Street, Salt Lake City. 
Treasurer, Miss Anna Baker, 654 East Third South 

Street, Salt Lake City. 



42. IDAHO 



WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1895 

President, Mrs. R. B. Wright, Boise. 
Secretary, Mrs. C. E. Mason, Mountainhome. 
Treasurer, Mrs. L. H. Johnston, Challis. 



2o8 The Home Missionary January, 1900 



SECRETARIES OF YOUNG PEOPLE'S WORK 



Minnesota. 



' Young Ladies' Work, Mrs. B. W. Smith, 600 West Thirty- 
second St., Minneapolis. 
Christian Endeavor Work, Miss Bertha Hanneman, 1816 Tort- 
land Ave., Minneapolis. 

Mass. and R. I Miss Bertha M. Shepard, 607 Congregational House, Boston. 

MICHIGAN Mrs. W. J. Gregory, 459 Third St., Manistee. 

Kansas Miss Harriet Broad, Topeka. 

Ohio Miss M. C. Smith, 840 Doan St., Cleveland. 

New York Mrs. Geo. R. Haines, 978 Delaware Ave., Buffalo. 

North Dakota Mrs. E. S. Shaw, Cooperstown. 

Oregon Mrs. W. D. Palmer, 443 West Park St., Portland. 

Washington Mrs. W. C. Davie, 423 North N St., Tacoma. 

South Dakota Mrs. Grace Burleigh, Mitchell. 

Illinois Mrs. J. T. Blanchard, 21S Walnut St., Aurora. 

Missouri. Miss Katherine Jones, 4337 Washington Ave., St. Louis. 

Iowa Miss Fannie Spencer, Alden. 

California Miss Caroline A. Potter, 600 Seventeenth St., Oakland. 

Nebraska Mrs. J. N. Hyder, 1520 U St., Lincoln. 

Southern California. . .Miss Phebe Mayhew, 4 Barnard Park, Los Angeles. 

VERMONT Mrs. G. W. Patterson, East St. Johnsbury. 

Colorado Mrs. A. D. Blakeslee, 145 South Lincoln St. , Denver. 

Montana Mrs. H. C. Arnold, 621 Spruce St., Helena. 

SECRETARIES OF CHILDREN'S WORK 

Minnesota Mrs. IT. S. Baker, 2268 Blake Ave., St. Anthony Park. 

Michigan ...Mrs. Geo. Wilson, Detroit. 

Kansas Miss Hattie Booth, Newton. 

Ohio Mrs. Effie Morgan, 380 St. Clair St., Cleveland. 

North Dakota Mrs. O. J. Wakefield, Wahpeton. 

South Dakota Mrs. I. Crain, Waubay. 

Illinois Miss Hattie Kline, 713 E. 63d St., Chicago. 

Nebraska. ... Mrs. H. D. Neely, 4371 Hamilton St., Omaha. 

Southern California. . .Miss Emily M. Peck, 920 W. Eighth St., Los Angeies- 
Montana Mrs. H. B. Segur, Billings. 



Congregational Home Missionary Society 



Field Secretaries 

Rev. W. G.Puddefoot, South Framingham, Mass. 

Rev. C. W. Shelton, Norwalk, Conn. , 

Superintendents 

Rev. Moritz E. Eversz, D.D., German Department, 153 La Salle St., Chicago, 111. 

Rev. S. V. S. Fisher, Scandinavian Department, Minneapolis, Minn. 

Rev. Henry A. Schauffler, D.D., Slavic Department, Cleveland, Ohio. 

Rev. Edw. D. Curtis, D.D Indianapolis, Ind. Rev. G. J. Powell Fargo, N. Dak. 

Rev. S. F. Gale Jacksonville, Fla. Rev. H. Sanderson Denver, Col. 

Rev. Alfred K. Wray, D.D Kansas City, Mo. Rev. C. T. Brown Salt Lake City, Utah. 

Rev. L. P. Broad Topeka, Kan. Rev. J. K. Harrison San Francisco, Cal. 

Rev. F. H. Allen Albuquerque, N. M. Rev. John L. Maile Los Angeles, Cal. 

Rev. A. Judson Bailey Seattle, Wash. Rev. C. F. Clapp Forest Grove, Ore. 

Rev. Homer W. Carter, D.D Beloit, Wis. r> -p w t ones T) D '-S 11 Woodland Terrace, 

?Rev. W. B.D.Gray... Cheyenne, Wyoming. ' ' " ■" ' ' '-J Philadelphia, Pa. 

Rev. Harmon Bross*D.D . Lincoln, Neb. Rev. W. S. Bell Helena, Mon. 

Rev. S. F. Gale (Act'g Supt. Ala.), Jacksonville, Fla. Rev. J. Homer Parker Kingfisher, Okl. 

Rev. Frank E. Jenkins Atlanta, Ga. Rev. R. B. Wright .Boise, Idaho. 

Rev. W. H. Thrall Huron, S. Dak. Rev. E. H. Ashmun Jerome, Ariz. 

Secretaries and Treasurers 

of the Auxiliaries 

Rev. Charles Harbutt, Secretary Maine Missionary Society 34 Dow St., Portland, Me. - 

W. P. Hubbard, Esq., Treasurer " " " Box 1052, Bangor, Me. 

Rev. A. T. Hillman, Secretary , New Hampshire Home Miss. Society Concord, N. H. 

Hon. Lyman D. Stevens, Treasurer " » " " ' " " Concord, N. H. 

Rev. Charles H. Merrill, Secretary Vermont Domestic " St. Johnsbury, Vt. 

Wm. C. Tyler, Treasurer " " " " St. Johnsbury, Vt. 

Rev. Joshua Coit, Secretary Massachusetts Home .... I 609 Cong'l House, 

Rev. Edwin B. Palmer, Treasurer " " ( Boston, Mass. 

Rev. J. H. Lyon, Secretary Rhode Island " . " Central Falls, R. I. 

Jos. Wm. Rice, Esq., Treasurer " " " " Providence, R. I. 

Rev. Joel S. Ives, Secretary Missionary Society of Connecticut Hartford, Conn. 

Ward W. Jacobs, Esq., Treasurer " " " Hartford, Conn. 

Rev. Ethan Curtis, Secretary New York Home Miss. Society Syracuse, N. Y. 

William Spalding, Treasurer " Syracuse ^"V* 

Rev. J. G. Fraser, D.D., Secretary Ohio " C eve and, Ohio. 

Rev J G. Fraser, D.D. , Treasurer " Cleveland, Ohio. 

Rev. James Tompkins, D.D., Secretary Illinois I 153 La Salle St., 

Aaron B. Mead, Esq., Treasurer " " ( Chicago, 111. 

Rev. Homer W. Carter, D.D., Secretary. . . .Wisconsin f,?!? 11 ' Wls " ,„. 

C. M. Blackman, Esq.. Treasurer : " Whitewater, Wis. 

-Rev. T. O. Douglass, D.D., Secretary Iowa S nnn ,.' Iow T a - 

J. H. Merrill, Esq., Treasurer "■ tt " " . Des Moines, Iowa. 

Rev William H Warren, D.D. , Secretary. .Michigan Home Miss. Society Lansing, Mich. 

Rev. Tohn P. Sanderson, Treasurer " . " ". " Lansing, Mich. 

Geo. H. Morgan, Secretary Cong. City Miss. Society St. Louis, Mo 

Rev. A. K. Wray, D.D. , Superintendent " " " ' Kansas City, Mo. " 

Lewis E. Snow, Treasurer " ' St. Louis, Mo. 

Communications 

relating to general business of the Society may be addressed to either of the Secretaries for Correspondence. 
Communications relating to the Editorial Department of The Home Missionary or of the Home Missionary 
section of Congregational Work, may be addressed to Rev. J. B. Clark, D D. Correspondence of the 
Woman's Department may be addressed to Mrs. H. S. Caswell, Congregational Rooms, New York. 

Donations and Subscriptions 

in Drafts, Checks, Registered Letters, or Post-Office Orders may be addressed to Wm. B. Howland, 
Treasurer, Fourth Avenue and 22d Street, New York. 

A PAYMENT OF $50 CONSTITUTES A LIFE MEMBER 

Form of a Bequest 

I bequeath to my executors the sum of dollars, in trust, to pay over the same, 

in months after my decease, to the person who, when the same is payable, shall act as Ireasurer 

of the Congregational Home Missionary Society, formed in the City of New York, in the year eighteen hundred 
and twenty-six, to be applied to the charitable use and purposes of said Society, and under its direction. 



Congregational Home Missionary Society 

Fourth Ave. and 2 2d St., New York 



Major-Gen eral Oliver O. Howard 

President 

Secretaries for Correspondence 
Rev. Joseph B. Clark, D.D. 



e i3f 9 H i 8t So7 n * CH0ATE > d - 

Wa hu t H J 



'9 
Mr. William B. Howland, TredsurrJt 



Executive Committee 

Wm. Ives Washburn, Esq., Chairman 

Asa A. Spear, Esq., Recording Secretary 

Mr. Joseph Wm. Rice 

Rev. Charles H. Richards, D.D 

Mr. George P. Stockwell 

Rev. John D. Kingsbury, D.D. 

Mr. George W. Hebard 

John H. Perry, Esq. 

Mr. John F. Anderson, Jr. 

Mr. Wm. H. Wanamaker 

Mr. Edwin H. Baker 

Rev. Edw. P. Ingersoll, D.D. 

Rev. John De Peu 

Press of J.J. Little & Co., Astor Place, New York 



KANSAS SELF-5PPP0BTIMG 



CUBAN TRAINING CLASS 



The 



Home Missionary 



April, 1900 




RICHARD CORDLEY 



KANSAS PIONEERS 

LEWIS BODWELL S. D. STORRS 



R. D. PARKER 



Vol. LXXIL No. 4 

New York 

Congregational Home Missionary Society 

Congregational Rooms, Fourth Ave. and 2 2d St. 

Entered at the Postoffice at New York, N. Y , as Second-class [Mail] Matter 



Contents for April, 1900 



PAGE 

Editorial Notes 209 

The Annual Meeting of the Society 214 

How Kansas Came to Self-sup- 
port, by Supt. L. P. Broad . . 214 

Beginnings in Kansas, by Rev. 

Richard Cordley, D.D 221 



Kansas Congregational Colleges . 22* 

President Henry Clay Simmns, 

D.D., by Rev. G. J. Powell . . 23] 

Hidden Treasures in Cuba, by 

Rev. E. P. Herrick 23^ 



The Home Missionary 



Is published quarterly, at thirty cents a year, postage paid. It is sent without charge, 
on request, to be made annually, to Life Members ; Missionaries of the Society anc 
its Auxiliaries; Ministers securing a yearly collection for it in their congregations 
also to individuals, associations, or congregations, one copy for a year for every te 
dollars collected and paid over to the Society or an Auxiliary. Suitable names should 
accompany the payment. Pastors are earnestly requested to serve Home Missions 
by promoting the use of this journal and " Congregational Work " at the Monthlj 
Concert and among their people. 

Immediate notice of discontinuance or change of postoffice address-should be given 



The Home Missionary 

Vol. L,XXII APRIL, 1900 No. 4 

EDITORIAL NOTES 
Eleven months of the financial year, from April 1 to March 1, 
are now complete. The record for these months shows an in- 
crease in contributions of $25,758.37, and in lega- 
The Treasury. cies a gain of $19,697.87, a total gain of $45,- 
456.24. Such a result, without any special appeal, 
is certainly gratifying, and seems to indicate a turn of the tide in 
favor of the treasury. The receipts of the closing month of the year, 
March, will determine how much of the debt resting upon the Society 
may be lifted before entering upon a new year. The apportionments of 
the new year have been made with this debt steadily in view, and for that 
reason have not been enlarged. It is by holding the work with a con- 
servative hand, and with the expectation of increasing receipts as the 
times continue to improve, that the Executive Committee hope before 
many months to liquidate the entire indebtedness of the Society. 

Commenting on the January number of The Home Missionary, a 
prominent Eastern pastor writes : "I have just read it through — a meaty 
number !" How many of our pastors read it "through" ? 
Through. Perhaps if the custom were more common, it might be 

as rewarding to all as it proved to the pastor referred to, 
who found in this one number material for his Sunday-morning dis- 
course and a fruitful topic for his midweek prayer-meeting. Try read- 
ing it through. 

The Executive Committee at the Hartford meeting appealed to the 
Home Missionary churches of the West for an advance of one hundred 
per cent, in their gifts to the treasury. The request was 
°ceilt u Advance r Dase d upon the alleged prosperity of the West, and sev- 
eral articles from Western superintendents published in 
the last two numbers of The Home Missionary establish beyond ques- 
tion the increased ability of the churches to respond to the call. In 
making out the apportionments of the year, beginning with April i, it 
has been assumed that the increase proposed will be realized, and it 
now remains for superintendents, pastors, and churches to begin early 
in the year to strike for this advance. Nor is this all. The apportion- 
ments have not been increased. It follows, therefore, that the people, by 
their increased pledges on salary, must come to the help of their own 
pastors. The Society can not make up the deficit in salaries which the 



210 The Home Missionary April, 1900 

last five years of depression have occasioned. Nor is this quite all. 
The rule requiring reduced application from year to year will be more 
strictly enforced, now that the financial distress has passed. All this 
may seem to throw a heavy burden upon the Home Missionary 
churches ; but has not the time come for these churches to bravely take 
up the burden, and to share more fully with the churches of the East 
in the support of their Home Missionary work ? 

The Committee on Benevolence, appointed by the State association 
at Holdredge, start out with the motto : "An offering from each member 

of each church for each of our benevolences." They say, 
Nebraska e pian. furthermore, to the churches : "We recognize, with you, 

that the supreme need of the hour is not money, but a 
fresh infilling of the Holy Spirit, that we may be quick to respond to 
God's call, no matter when or whence it comes ; that the special call now 
is for money, that the mission work that we have begun may be sustained 
and enlarged ; that the stream of our benevolences should not be a geyser 
that spouts with turbulent enthusiasm whenever a fervent missionary 
secretary throws a handful of weighty arguments into our bosom, but a 
perennial spring of even flow ; that our mission work ought to depend 
neither on special appeals nor upon the uncertainties of the weather on 
collection Sunday ; that the churches should recognize our seven benev- 
olences as part of their regular church work, to be provided for just as 
the pastor's salary and other home expenses are; and that our mis- 
sion work should be put upon a business basis." All of which is 
sound sense, and deserves a hearty Amen ! 

The following, taken from the column of church notices in a Havana 
paper of recent date, is suggestive : 

" Congregational. — Rev. A. De Barritt announces 

Con fn e HaVana ,ism *^ at t ^ ie superintendent, Rev. E. P. Herrick, will preach 

at the Congregational Rooms, Calle B, No. 22 Vedado, 

Sunday morning, at 10 o'clock. Sunday-school at 2 p.m., No. 14 

Calle B. 

" Mr. Herrick will also preach at the chapel, No. 231 Aguila, corner 
Gloria, at 7 :3c All are cordially welcome. 

" Rev. J. M. Lopez will preach in English at No. 69 Consulado at 
10 130 a.m. 

" Preaching in Spanish at No. 69 Consulado and No. 281 Aguila at 
7 =30 p.m." 

There are now twelve Congregational services of various kinds in 
Havana every week, besides a sewing-school and mothers' meeting, con- 
ducted by Mrs. Herrick, and calls from several outlying and important 



April, 1900 The Home Missionary 211 

points, soon to be supplied. The picture of Mr. Herrick's training-class, 
found on another page, illustrates another important feature of the 
Cuban work. 

Three "plain statements" have recently appeared in successive issues 
of the Congregationalist from the pen of Secretary Coit touching the in- 
terests of the Massachusetts Home Missionary Society. 
0ur Auxifiaryf etts They are models of clear statement and of pertinent ap- 
peal, which we would be glad, if able, to republish in The 
Home Missionary. The first describes the emergency of the State foreign 
work, now that the Swett Fund is so nearly exhausted, and appeals for 
increased gifts from the churches for its support and development. The 
second is a plea for the continued care of the country churches, both for 
their own sake and for the sake of the cities that draw so much of their 
strength from the hills. Twenty-five of these hill towns show a de- 
crease in recent years of seventeen per cent, in population; yet in the 
same time church membership has advanced from one in twenty to one 
in fifteen. This is the fruit of Home Missionary effort. The third plain 
statement is a strong claim for the supreme value of the church as dis- 
tinct from all other agencies in saving men and uplifting the moral 
character of communities. It must be gratefully added, while this three- 
fold appeal is primarily for home missions in the Bay State, it does not 
ignore, upon the contrary, with the time-honored spirit of our Massa- 
chusetts auxiliary, it magnifies the needs and claims of the National 
work. 

A memorial sermon preached in the Second Congregational Church, 
Greenwich, Connecticut, by his brother, Dr. John H. Barrows, president 

of Oberlin College, lies upon our table. The Home 
Mannfng*Barrows. Missi° nar y has no department for a review of books and 

other publications, and this loving memorial deserves 
more than a passing notice. It is indeed a model of fraternal fondness 
and of judicious eulogy. The springs of Walter Barrows's life, and the 
sources of his winsome and almost magnetic character, are here laid bare 
by one who knew him in the closeness of a brother's love. Those associ- 
ated with him in the ministry and in Home Missionary administration 
often wondered at his singular courage, his faith and Christian optimism, 
and at the spiritual intensity of all his work. The key to the marvel is 
supplied by this beautiful memorial. Dr. Barrows was by nature and by 
training a man of broad and prophetic ideals, a man of vision. He saw 
things as they ought to be, rather than as they were; and so, by his 
strong, hopeful spirit, things as they were became as they ought to be. 
This intense faith in the future made his success as a teacher, pastor, 



212 The Home Missionary April, 1900 

and missionary secretary ; and the same faith in the future, and the men 
and women endowed with the gift, are the hope of the world. 

To many of our readers, the name and the thing it signifies may be 
equally unfamiliar. For seven years past it has been the custom of the 
National Society and its auxiliaries (Maine only except- 
conv J e a iTuonf e< ^) to meet together by delegates in the month of Janu- 
ary, and take account of their common work. The dele- 
gates from auxiliary States are usually the State Secretary and one mem- 
ber of the Executive Board. Those from the National Society include 
the officers and all members of the Executive Committee who can make it 
convenient to attend. The missionary receipts of the coming year are 
carefully estimated, and the needs and expenditures of each society are 
as carefully canvassed. The convention then passes upon the apportion- 
ment to be used in each State and in the National field, which apportion- 
ment becomes operative when the separate Boards have ratified the ac- 
tion of the convention. It is thus that mutual acquaintance of the work 
and the workers is promoted, and a delightful Home Missionary fellow- 
ship is established and renewed from year to year. Some important 
changes in the relations of the National and the State Societies were pro- 
posed at the recent meeting, of which we may speak more freely in the 
future. 

There is more co-operation between the homeland societies than is 
sometimes recognized ; more, perhaps, than is generally known. Thus 
the Home Missionary Society and the Sunday-school 
co>operation. Society have superintendents under their joint commis- 
sion in Montana, Wyoming, and Alaska. The Home 
Missionary Society and the Education Society have united in the sup- 
port of " preacher-principals," so-called, in Utah, the same man serv- 
ing as teacher during the week and as preacher on the Sabbath. The 
relations of the Home Missionary Society and the Church Building 
Society are especially close and mutually helpful, the superintendents 
of the former being the unpaid and invaluable agents of the latter in 
the location and erection of churches on Home Missionary ground. In 
addition to these organized forms of co-operation, there is found to- 
day in our benevolent societies a most cordial recognition of common 
interests and a fellowship of service, which it is the pleasure of com- 
mittees and officers to recognize and in all ways to promote. What- 
ever the demand of the churches for still closer bonds, let no one infer 
from the agitation of the matter that rivalry, competition, or want of 
harmony prevail among Congregational benevolent agencies as they 






April, 1900 The Home Missionary 213 

now exist and are carried on. No inference would be further from 
the truth. In fact, the exact opposite is conspicuously true. 

Several calls have reached us for copies of the striking likeness of 
Dr. Clapp which appeared on the cover of the July Home Mission- 
ary. To satisfy any demand of this kind, one hun- 
Dr ' A pictu?J apP ' s ^red co pi es nave been struck off on a highly finished 
paper, nine by twelve inches, and suitable for fram- 
ing. We shall be happy to mail a copy to any friend of Dr. Clapp 
who may request it. 

A roll of honor, to include churches coming to self-support, was 

opened in the January number of The Home Missionary. Thirty-four 

churches were then reported. To this number may 

Ron of Honor, now be added the following twenty-eight that have 

reached self-support within the last three months : 

Connecticut : Stony Creek. German Department, Lincoln, Nebraska. 
Iowa: Castana, Gait, Grand View, Keck, Lansing Ridge, Slater, Washta. 
Massachusetts : Needham, West Stockbridge Centre. Michigan : East 
Nelson, Cedar Springs. Nebraska : Doniphan, South Platte, West Ham- 
ilton, Pierce. New Hampshire : Newcastle. New York State : Corning, 
Mount Hope, New York City. North Dakota : Hankinson. Pennsyl- 
vania : Pilgrim Church, Plymouth ; Snyder Avenue, Philadelphia. 
Rhode Island : Swedish Church, Providence. Scandinavian Depart- 
ment, Tacoma, Washington. Wisconsin : Bloomer, Cambria, and Ran- 
dolph. 

The April magazine is, to some extent, and deservedly, a Kansas 
number. No State inJ.he Home Missionary family, unless it be Califor- 
nia, had a more thrilling and even tragic beginning. Dr. 
self-supporting. Richard Cordley, whose Kansas pastorates cover nearly 
the entire period of her missionary history, has fittingly 
told the story, which no one better knows, and in which he bore a dis- 
tinguished part. Superintendent Broad enlightens us as to the way in 
which the State cast off her dependence and entered into the rank of 
auxiliary States. If we are not mistaken, the result is largely due to the 
campaign of education which Mr. Broad has pushed with a vigor and 
thoroughness which should be an inspiration to other States and mis- 
sionary superintendents. By an excellent system he has for years been 
sowing the churches with missionary intelligence. We confidently be- 
lieve that the harvest will prove to be an intelligent and growing interest 
in National home missions beyond the bounds of their own State and 
beyond the date of self-support. Forty years of help, largely from the 
East, can not be easily forgotten. Eastern givers and friends of the 



214 The Home Missionary April, 1900 

West will not look in vain for the help of Kansas in carrying to comple- 
tion the unfinished task of saving America. 

THE ANNUAL MEETING OF THE SOCIETY 

The Seventy-fourth Annual Meeting of this Society will be held in 
the First Congregational Church of Detroit, Michigan, June 5-7. 

Rev. H. P. Dewey, D.D., of Concord, New Hampshire, will preach 
the opening sermon on the evening of Tuesday, June 5. 

A full announcement of the speakers at this meeting, also of the 
railroad and hotel arrangements, will be made in an early number ot 
Congregational Work. 

Every contributing Congregational church is entitled to two annual 
members, who have full voting rights at the meeting. 

HOW KANSAS CAME TO SELF-SUPPORT 

By Superintendent L. P. Broad 

In complying with the request of the Secretary-Editor to answer this 
question, I say, in general, that self-support in Kansas has been reached 
by the same principles and methods that have been relied upon in other 
missionary States. With us, it may be that certain methods have been 
emphasized, because, in Kansas, this was practicable and desirable. 

Speaking negatively, we have not reached the goal by dropping use- 
ful churches. Our present number of churches is 178, and our average 
number for the last twelve years has been 189. During this period our 
western frontier has become largely depopulated, and several of our 
dropped churches were located there ; and meanwhile we have gained 
one-fifth in total membership. No church has been dropped simply or 
primarily to save missionary money. Neither has self-support come 
through undue reduction of missionary grants to churches. The aim 
has always been to grant enough aid to enable a church to spend its 
own money to the best advantage. Nor have churches been urged to 
assume self-support prematurely or on an inadequate salary. Almost 
without exception, churches have undertaken self-support voluntarily; 
and in several cases missionary money has been offered to churches 
contemplating self-support, and declined. 

First of all, to our progressive churches and noble pastors do we 
owe self-support- With high ideals, unwillingness to be dependent be- 
yond necessity, and imbued with the conviction that neither a church 
nor the State ought to accept missionary funds when they have become 
able to furnish the money themselves, our pastors have grandly and 
self-sacrificingly led the way, and the people have followed. 



April, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



215 



Preeminently, the reason why we have come to State self-support 
is that such a large number of churches have come to self-sup- 
port. They have said to our Missionary Board : " Thank you. Good- 
by! Hereafter we will be givers, not getters." Two instances are in 
point: In 1898 a rural church in western Kansas paid $150, with par- 
sonage, for one-half time of a pastor. In 1899 it became self-support- 
ing, declined offered aid, paid $250 and parsonage for one-half service, 




REV. L. P. BROAD, SUPERINTENDENT OF KANSAS 



and contributed $38 to the C. H. M. S. ; and in 1900 it has already 
raised $513 for the coming year, the amount is growing, and the pastor 
will hereafter give his entire time to the field. Another western Kansas 
church paid $450 and parsonage toward the salary in 1897, became self- 
supporting on a salary of $600 and parsonage in 1898, and has just 
closed its first year of self-support, with a record of $1,200 expended, 
no debt, and a contribution to each one of the benevolent societies. Self- 



2l6 



The Home Missionary 



April, 1900 



supporting churches are promoting State self-support by enlarged con- 
tributions. 

Our efficient Board of Directors has steadily prepared the way for 
the forward movement. Composed of thirteen men, representing every 
section and interest, holding sessions at times for two days, studying 
patiently each church and appropriation, this active and vigilant body 
has been the controlling force in our State work. Money has not been 
assigned to associations, but to churches only ; and the committees and 
superintendents were relied upon to reduce or withhold the proposed 
grant if new circumstances arose which made this desirable. The Board 
has scanned the whole field, and its recommendations have carried great 




FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, TOPEKA, KANSAS 



weight ; as, for instance, in the case at Wichita, where the four churches 
were combined into two, with most satisfactory results. 

Undoubtedly the action of the Kansas Home Missionary Society in 
1892, fixing upon 1900 as the year for State self-support, has stimulated 
the churches thereto. Missionary churches have acted more on the self- 
supporting principle — less aid and more payment by the church. The 
specific method by which we proposed to reach self-support in 1900 — 
to take less annually, and proportionately increase our contributions — 
has been carried out only in the first particular. But I believe that our 
churches have given more to the C. H. M. S. than they would have given 
without this plan ; and changed and unforeseen conditions have made 
self-support practicable in another way. In 1892 we expected an in- 
creasing population, pressing openings for new work, a thriving western 



April, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



217 



frontier, and a continuation of prosperous times; but, in fact, the re- 
verse of these conditions prevailed. Immigration ceased, churches of all 
denominations concentrated effort on keeping alive the churches they 
had, the western third of the State was practically abandoned by farm- 



-~1 





THE TABERNACLE, PITTSBURG, KANSAS 



ers, and the State and Nation were, for a time, in financial distress. To 
counterbalance our failure to increase our contributions, therefore, came 
lessened demand for expenditure; and whereas, in 1892, we judiciously 
expended $21,000, we met our Home Missionary need in 1898-99 with 




SOD CHURCH, MT. AYR, KANSAS 

$8,000. Meanwhile we have retained about the same number of 
churches, with a large advance in local self-support. 

State evangelism, vigorously maintained for fifteen years, has, we 
believe, borne abundant fruitage, financially as well as spiritually, and 
promoted self-support. The nearly eleven years of service of Evangel- 



2l8 



The Home Missionary 



April, 1900 



ist W. C. Veazie were invaluable in leading the churches to high ideals 
in Christian living and giving. 

Other promotive agencies of self-support have been : Providing pas- 
tors with pamphlet cases of Home Missionary literature, to which new 
documents were added as issued ; extensive annual circulation of this 




FIRST CHURCH, EMPORIA, KANSAS 



literature among the church members, 23,000 documents having been 
mailed in one year, mainly to individuals ; special efforts to strengthen 
the meetings of the local associations, in the interest of State unity and 
fellowship ; and the very valuable cooperation of our State superintend- 
ents of Sunday-school work, especially in opening work in districts 



April, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



219 



which brought financial help to churches in neighboring towns. The 
debt of the National Society, stirring moral questionings concerning the 
propriety of receiving its aid longer and preventing new work, has con- 
firmed the churches in their purpose to begin self-support on the pro- 




IPfef 



** 



^W^^^TW^ 



' Sh 




PLYMOUTH CHURCH, WICHITA, KANSAS 

posed date ; as has also the manifest and growing prosperity of Kansas, 
making us no longer a frontier State, and rendering it unnecessary for 
us longer to ask church charity of older States that are burdened with 
their own Home Missionary needs, especially after we have been aided 




VOLTAIRE CHURCH, EN-ROUTE TO GOODLAND, KANSAS 



by the National Society for forty-five years to April, 1899, to the total 
amount of $767,000. Since the Spanish war, too, the feeling of nation- 
alism has strengthened among us. We are impressed with the fact that 
Kansas Congregationalism has never contributed a dollar through the 
C. H. M. S. to evangelize our country outside of our State borders, and 



220 The Home Missionary April, 1900 

that we now have our share of responsibility for the evangelization of 
the greater United States ; and as a first step toward this larger service, 
we decide to draw no more money from the C. H. M. S. for use in 
Kansas. It is true, too, that we expect larger spiritual blessings, and in 
time larger gifts for home missions for our State and National work, as 
a result of our State self-support. 

Finally, we have been impelled to State self-support by the belief 
that the amount needed to meet our own Home Missionary expenditure 
is quite within our reach by united effort. Our expenditure in 1899- 
1900 will not exceed $7,500. The arrival of churches at self-support 
and normal reduction of grants will reduce our need for old work for 
next year to $6,000. During the last ten years we have contributed an 




CENTRAL CHURCH, TOPEKA. — REV. C. M. SHELDON, I'ASTOR 

annual average of $4,340 to the C. H. M. S. (exclusive of legacies). In 
one of those years we contributed $5,327. Of the 178 churches on our 
rolls, 119 are self-supporting — that is, 70 churches support a pastor for 
full time, 24 churches are self-supporting by having one-half of a pas- 
tor's service, 14 churches are self-supporting, with preaching at regular 
intervals, and 11 churches are self-supporting, with lay services and 
occasional preaching as the profitable and chosen plan for their present 
work. Forty-six churches, or about one-fourth of the entire number, 
are, at this writing, on our Home Missionary list. 

We take the step of State self-support unitedly, humbly, and trust- ' 
fully, because it is to us the path of faith — 'the path in which the money 
consideration is never the first. 



April, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



221 



BEGINNINGS IN KANSAS 

By Rev. Richard Cordley, D.D. 
The settlement of Kansas grew out of the determination of the 
North to make Kansas a free State, after Congress had thrown it open 
to slavery, in May, 1854. The object appealed with peculiar force to 
the people of New England. Very naturally, there were many Con- 
gregationalists among the first immigrants. As soon as the movement 
took form, the American Home Missionary Society commissioned Rev. 
S. Y. Lum, of Middletown, New York, " to proclaim the Gospel in 
Kansas." He arrived in Lawrence September 15, 1854. Two com- 
panies of immigrants had arrived before him, and some of them were 
already talking of a church. A month later Plymouth Church was 
organized, the first church of any 
name in the Territory. The serv- 
ices were held in " The Old Hay 
Tent," consisting of two rows of 
poles, brought together at the top, 
and the sides thatched with prairie 
hay. The room was also used as 
a general sleeping apartment, the 
trunks, bunks, and boxes of the 
lodgers serving for seats on Sun- 
day. The minister had to build 
his own house. It was built of 
" shakes." These were split from 
logs and nailed to a frame, cover- 
ing sides and roof. It was well 
ventilated, but not blizzard proof. 
A blanket of snow on the bed and 
a carpet of snow on the floor were 
no unusual thing in the morning. 
They wore their winter wraps 
while cooking over a red-hot stove, 
and water often froze on their 

clothing, while their faces tingled with the heat of the fire. But it was 
" like priest, like people." They all fared alike, and there was no mur- 
muring. During the border-ruffian troubles of 1855-56, Mr. Lum took 
his place with the rest in the defense of the town, and bore his full por- 
tion of the burden and the loss. His horses were stolen by the border 
ruffians, and they once took him prisoner and threatened to hang him, 
but finally released him without harm. These disturbances continued 
for three years, during which time the town was besieged three times by 




DR. RICHARD CORDLEY 



222 The Home Missionary April, 1900 

armed Missourians, and once was sacked and pillaged. The church 
kept on as it could, meeting sometimes in a little, close room, where they 
roasted, and sometimes in an open shanty, where they froze. Often 
they could not meet at all, and often the men were called out during 
service by an alarm of coming danger. In the spring of 1857 Mr. Lum 
resigned on account of ill health, and the church was pastorless for 
several months. 

During the Kansas troubles the writer of this was in Andover Semi- 
nary. In the summer of 1856 four members of the middle class agreed 
together to go to Kansas at the end of their course. They graduated 
in July, 1857, and made their way, one by one, to Kansas. I did not 
go till late in the autumn. I reached Jefferson City, the end of the rail- 
way, November 19, and took passage on a steamboat for Ouindaro. It 
turned bitterly cold that night, and, with low water, high wind, and a 
river full of floating ice, the steamer made slow progress. In four days 
she only made eighty miles, when the captain gave up the trip and put 

us ashore. We hired a 



mule team to take us the 
-<-* : * rest of the way. We 

> started Monday morning 
-NW , in the bitter cold, and 
ended our journey the 
Pj last of the week in a 
ggggPgSPBr / drenching rain. But my 
troubles were not yet 
over. There was no pub- 
lic conveyance to Law- 
rence, and I hired a col- 
ored teamster to haul me and my goods over. We started Tuesday morn- 
ing from Quindaro, and reached Lawrence about noon Wednesday. 
The town seemed smaller than I had expected to find it, but I soon 
found it was not so small as it seemed. Every house and shanty, sod cabin 
and tent, was filled to its utmost capacity. And they were not the drift- 
wood of the frontier, but people who had come with a purpose. Busi- 
ness and professional men had left their business and come to this far 
country under the inspiration of an idea. College students just gradu- 
ated, or before graduation, had turned their backs on the career they 
had marked out for themselves and come to Kansas at the call of free- 
dom. It was no unusual thing to find college graduates and men of 
culture driving a team on the street, or chopping logs in the woods, or 
living in a " shake shanty," 

" Far out upon the prairie." 




THE HAY TENT, 1854, LAWRENCE, KANSAS 



April, 1900 The Home Missionary 223 

Like all men consecrated to an idea, they were ready to make sacrifices 
for it. At whatever cost of toil, or treasure, or life, Kansas must be a 
free State. The town was so full that my study for three weeks was in 
a carpenter's shop; and I prepared my sermons with three carpenters 
hammering away a few feet from me. I slept meanwhile in the un- 
finished garret of the same building. But I was as well off as other 
people, and had no occasion to find fault. 

Plymouth Church was three years old, and had twenty-two resident 
members. They had begun to build a house of worship. It was of 
stone, substantial and well built, and of good size. They had inclosed 
the building, put in the windows and laid the floor, and then were com- 
pelled to stop for want of funds. The windows had been put in with- 
out casings, the walls and ceiling were without plaster, and the doorway 
had been closed up with 
rough boards, one board 
being left to swing for an 
entrance. The winter 
winds used to laugh at 
these loose boards, and run 
in through the cracks, and 
cool the ardor of the con- 
gregation. The roof was 
said to be a good one, but 
in spite of that the snow 
would siit tnrougn ana OLD STONE church, lawrence, kansas 

powder the heads of the 

worshipers. The seats were rough benches, and around the walls a 
row of seats had been made by placing boards on nail kegs and boxes. 
The pulpit platform was simply a pile of rough lumber, which was for- 
ever threatening to tip over and spill the preacher out. It required care- 
ful balancing to keep one's poise on such a foundation. But the church 
was as good as the houses the people lived in, and nobody complained of 
it, or made that an excuse for absence. The congregations were good 
and very inspiring. It was a wide-awake lot of people who found their 
way to Kansas at that time, and they were as wide awake in church as 
anywhere else. 

There was not much money in the country, and we finished our 
church by piecemeal, a little each year. Our first effort was to put in 
the outside doors and " stop the draft." This only cost thirty dol- 
lars, but it required a canvass of the whole community to secure it. 
Then came the plastering, the casing of the windows, the gallery and 




224 



The Home Missionary 



April, 1900 



pulpit, and finally the pews — all occupying five years. In 1862 the 
building was complete, and the church assumed self-support. In 1861 
the war broke out, and Kansas was in the focus of it. One call for 
troops followed another, and regiment after regiment marched away. 
From a population of one hundred thousand, twenty thousand men 
" went forth to the war." In some neighborhoods not an able-bodied 




PLYMOUTH CHURCH, LAWRENCE, KANSAS 



man remained, and in some churches not a single male member was 
left at home. 

In the midst of the war came " Quantrell's Raid," August 21, 1863. 
In four hours three hundred bushwhackers laid the town in ashes, and 
left one hundred and fifty dead upon the streets. There remained more 
than eighty newly made widows and two hundred and fifty newly made 



April, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



225 



orphans. Plymouth Church suffered heavily. Sixteen members of 
the congregation were killed, and nearly all the members were homeless 
and penniless. The Sabbath after, the remnant gathered in the church. 
There were men in their shirt sleeves who had not saved a coat, women 
in sunbonnets and shawls, and children in whatever they could be 
wrapped in. One might say that the entire wardrobe of the congrega- 
tion was in the church that morning. Rev. G. C. Morse, of Emporia, 
whose brother-in-law was among 
the dead, was present and conduct- 
ed the service. Neither of us felt 
like saying anything, and no one 
felt that anything needed to be 
said. Mr. Morse read Psalm lxxix., 
which seemed to have been written 
for the occasion; and then he of- 
fered prayer and dismissed the con- 
gregation. 

The town was rebuilt as rapidly 
as possible, and the church slowly 
recovered. The Home Missionary 
Society came promptly to the res- 
cue, and made the church a grant 
which carried them through one 
year, when they again took upon 
them the whole burden. 

The spiritual progress of the 
church during these ten years was 
very slow, but there was real gain. 
The prayer-meetings were held in 
private houses, and were small, but 
were sometimes marked by great 
power. The excitements had drawn 
Christians away from spiritual 
things, and many had become in- 
different. As the interest increased, these Christians returned to their 
places. One by one they would drop into our meetings and add them- 
selves to our effective force. There was no general revival, but every 
now and then someone heard the Word, and came forward and acknowl- 
edged Christ. The pastor's wife meanwhile met the girls every week 
in her parlor, and in the ten years between thirty and forty of these were 
added to the church, and have been effective workers for Christ in dif- 
ferent sections of the State. 




REV. S. Y. LUM 



226 The Home Missionary April, 1900 

When peace returned, the progress was more rapid. In 1867 a gen- 
eral revival began to manifest itself, which continued in varying degrees 
for several years. It was not easy to say just what occasioned it. It 
was the culmination of all that went before — the harvest of many sea- 
sons of sowing. A new church now became a necessity, and the present 
edifice was erected at a cost of forty-five thousand dollars. 

This is only one story of many that might be told. The story of 
Rev. Lewis Bodwell, who founded the Topeka church, would read like 
a romance. The same might be said of Rev. R. D. Parker, who founded 
the Leavenworth church ; of Rev. S. D. Storrs, who founded what is 
now the First Church of Kansas City; of Rev. G. C. Morse, who 
founded the Emporia church ; or of President McVicar, who founded 
Washburn College. In Church as well as State Kansas has illustrated 
the motto of her State seal : "Ad Astra per Aspera." 



KANSAS CONGREGATIONAL COLLEGES 

True to their New England ancestry, the first settlers of Kansas 
were enthusiastic promoters of education. In the language of the Puri- 
tan Chronicler of 1643, they " longed to advance learning and perpetu- 
ate it to posterity." " No new State," says a Kansas pioneer, " ever 
laid the foundations for educating her people, intellectually and morally, 
broader and deeper." Scarely had Eli Thayer and Charles Robinson 
planted their first colony at Lawrence, when they set aside a command- 
ing eminence near by, Mount Oread — so named, doubtless, in affection- 
ate remembrance of the Worcester (Massachusetts) hill on which stood 
Thayer's own home and school — to be the site of the new State's future 
college. At the same time, Mr. A. A. Lawrence, of Boston, condition- 
ally offered ten thousand dollars toward the endowment of the proposed 
college. The Territorial Legislature declared " it should be the aim of 
the educators of Kansas to make this Territory a model State in Ameri- 
can literature. . . . We have all the elements for building up a 
system of universities, colleges, schools, and seminaries of learning un- 
equaled by any other on the globe." During the period, 1855-60, the 
Legislature chartered no less than eighteen universities and ten colleges t 
Happily for the interests of education, all of these embryo colleges, save 
four or five, soon died. 

Naturally, the Congregational brethren did not lag behind in this 
eager struggle to put the infant commonwealth in the forefront of edu- 



April, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



227 



cational progress. Under the lead of Rev. S. Y. Lum and others, they 
tried to establish Monumental College — to be a memorial of those who 
fought and fell in the " Free-State War " — on Mount Oread, and there- 
by secure the Lawrence Fund, already mentioned. But they failed, as 
had the Presbyterians before, and as did the Episcopalians afterward. 
For the best interests of learning, doubtless, the noble State University 
now crowns the summit of this Kansas Acropolis, overlooking as beau- 
tiful and rich an expanse of smiling valley and stream as the sun shines 
upon ; standing out under the cloudless sky to welcome incoming visitors 




WASHBURN COLLEGE, TOPEKA, KANSAS 



and settlers from the East as the commonwealth's most fitting represen- 
tation of universal secular education. 

Among the various efforts by our pioneer fathers to found a Congre- 
gational college, that by a few first settlers of Topeka finally succeeded. 
In 1858 the General Association, in session at Manhattan, voted to locate 
their denominational school at Topeka, provided the citizens of the place 
would furnish a suitable site and erect a building. Two noble men, 
Colonel John Ritchie and Mr. H. D. Rice, determined these conditions 
should be fulfilled. With money obtained as a loan in New England by 
the solicitations of the latter, the loan secured by a mortgage on the 
Topeka homestead of the former, the farm which now constitutes the 



228 The Home Missionary April, 1900 

admirable site of Washburn College was purchased. In time, and 
mainly through the sacrifices and efforts of these two men, the promised 
first college building was erected, and site and edifice paid for. 

The school was first called Topeka Institute ; but when incorporated 
as a college, February 6, 1865, it took the name of Lincoln College, in 
honor of the great President ; the title afterward exchanged for Wash- 
burn, in part to avoid confusion with another older school of the same 
name, and in gratitude to a munificent Eastern benefactor of the infant 
college, the wares from whose vast manufactory now literally engirdle 
the globe as the vehicles of the world's swift messengers of intelligence. 

Rev. Samuel D. Bowker, a Home Missionary from Maine, was the 
first principal of the school; to be succeeded, in 1869, by Rev. H. Q. 
Butterfield as president of the college. In 1871 Rev. Peter McVicar, a 
pioneer Home Missionary in Kansas, later for years the efficient and 
beloved State Superintendent of Public Instruction, one of the incorpor- 
ators of the college in 1865, became president, destined under God, 
through a period of more than a quarter century, by his ceaseless labors 
and cares, by personal sacrifices and trials known to few servants of 
Christ in any other line of missionary work, by the exercise of much 
good Scotch common-sense, by a persistency and pluck that would never 
own defeat, to develop the frail, halting, uncertain institute into the 
strong, well-appointed, influential college which we know to-day. " The 
burden " of the young college was Doctor McVicar's " opportunity." 
The honor of noble success is his also. 

The steady growth of patronage for the last sixteen years, as shown 
by the number of students in the college classes in successful years — 
seventeen in 1884, twenty-eight in 1886, seventy-eight in 1893, ninety- 
six in 1899 — testifies to the degree of stability and prosperity to which 
Washburn College has attained. Rev. George M. Herrick, Lit.D., for- 
merly Field Secretary of the Congregational Education Society, is now 
the laborious and able successor to Doctor McVicar. 

In 1888 Wichita, situate in the broad and rich valley of the Arkansas 
River, two hundred and thirty miles southwest of Kansas City and sixty 
miles north of Oklahoma, was experiencing a " boom " in population, 
enterprise, and (supposed) real-estate values which has rarely fallen to 
the lot of any American town. Within two years the population had 
advanced from six or eight thousand to more than thirty thousand. 
Every form of enterprise and industry, good and bad, kept pace with 
this remarkable swelling of population. Four universities and one col- 
lege were chartered by as many religious sects during this period, much 
money expended for each, and costly buildings erected for three of them. 



April, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



229 



The enterprising people were determined that their city should not only 
become the greatest emporium of commerce and industry between the 
Father of Waters and the Continental Divide, but also a great educa- 
tional and literary center. 

The Congregational brethren of the city, who had already expanded 
into four or five churches in the different quarters of the municipality, 
resolved that they would also have their school. But their thought was 
less ambitious, more sane perhaps, than the educational schemes of the 




FAIRMOUNT COLLEGE, WICHITA, KANSAS 

rest. They would aim to have a college only — not seek the unattainable 
university mark ; and their college should be for the higher education of 
women — to become the " Vassar of the Plains." 

At a convenient distance from the center of business, on a high ridge 
overlooking city and valley, they bought a farm ; divided the farm into 
city lots for a population of ten thousand ; ran streets through the tract, 
designated by the names of the most illustrious of our American colleges, 
as Vassar, Holyoke, Harvard, etc. ; and in the center of the tract, at the 
highest point, they reserved a large space as the site of the proposed 
college. They called in the services of a skilled landscape architect to 



230 The Home Missionary April, 1900 

locate the half-score of buildings which their dilated vision saw rising 
in the near future, and to plan the one college edifice which they would 
at once essay to build. 

During 1888-89, by proceeds from the sale of city lots, by individual 
contributions of money on the largest scale of liberality, reaching in one 
instance to ten thousand dollars, and by borrowing from Eastern friends, 
eager to secure seven and eight percentage on their investments, these 
Congregational college builders erected a large, solidly built, commodi- 
ous, and beautiful structure on " the hill," which they called Fairmount 
College, after the name of the city addition of which it was the center. 
The building is reported to have cost $60,000, with its interior still alto- 
gether unfinished. 

But on the sudden breaking of the " Wichita boom," and the com- 
plete financial collapse of the community, all progress on the college 
ceased, and the splendid structure was left to stand out on the otherwise 
vacant landscape as a gigantic failure, a prospective ruin. 

In 1892 " the brethren " in Wichita besought the Congregational Ed- 
ucation Society to come to their help and rescue this valuable property 
from impending ruin, and build up in it a needed school of learning. 
After official examination of the premises and the environment, the Soci- 
ety assented; and in the fall of that year Fairmount Academy was 
opened to students. In the spring of 1895 the Society invited Dr. N. J. 
Morrison, then professor of philosophy in Marietta College, to visit the 
school, with a view to taking charge of it, and in due time, if circum- 
stances should favor, carry out the original plan to make it a college. 

The fall term of 1895 opened with a good attendance of eager stu- 
dents, of whom twelve constituted the freshman college class. In the 
spring of 1896 the school was incorporated as Fairmount College, the 
original corporate name, now, however, designed for both sexes, instead 
of women alone. 

Since that date, the regular work of a college and connected academy, 
both of the New England standard, has gone steadily forward, with 
ever-enlarging patronage, improved facilities for instruction, and grow- 
ing resources. The library, in 1895 numbering two hundred volumes, 
now contains about eighteen thousand, besides a great quantity of un- 
bound pamphlets. It is a well-organized and valuable library, in con- 
stant use by students and the public. In June, 1899, the first college 
class, of eight members, was graduated ; the present freshman class 
numbers thirty-three. From the first the college has had an unusually 
able and devoted faculty — no Home Missionary college ever had a better 
m its early years — who have had their training in the best American 
and European schools. 



April, 1900 The Home Missionary 231 

Fairmount has a large and most inviting field from which to draw its 
patronage and on which to expend the blessings of its accomplished 
work. It is the opinion of many that no other young Congregational 
college has a more ample and inviting field. And in doing its appointed 
work it will trench on the rights, or prerogatives, or territory of no other 
existent Congregational college. Southern Kansas, Oklahoma, and 
Texas constitute " the field " of the college, in which territory there is 
no other college under the direction of Congregationalists. 

How important the young college appears to the shrewd business 
man of Chicago, whose millions have already gone forth to bless schools 
and colleges all over the country, is shown by the fact that at the end of 
the third year of the college's corporate existence this munificent college 
builder had promised to Fairmount a large endowment, on his usual 
conditions. With the completion of the Pearsons endowment, Fair- 
mount College may justly expect to have college classes of fifty or sixty 
students each year — an attendance equal to that of historic New England 
colleges, until recently. The boys and girls are there in the high schools 
of the villages and cities of Kansas and Oklahoma. If Fairmount is 
fully equipped, they will be trained there ; but for Fairmount, nearly all 
of them would be lost to what we may call Congregational training. 



PRESIDENT HENRY CLAY SIMMONS, D.D. 

Superintendent of Home Missions for North Dakota, 1882 to 1897. 
By Rev. Gregory J. Powell. 

How sudden his death on the evening of the 20th of last December ! 

Not feeling well, he lay down after supper, and Mrs. Simmons, with 
her eldest son, went to the church prayer-meeting. He remembered 
some important errand, and went down into the city. He had just asked 
the clerk in a bookstore a question, and without a sign of distress fell, 
and before the body reached the floor the great soul had taken its flight. 

Many a heart stood still as the news spread through the sorrow- 
stricken city and flashed across the State and Nation that one of the 
great pioneers in Home Missionary and educational work had fallen. 

He died " in the harness," and that was almost to be expected of a 
man of his indomitable spirit. 

His physicians and friends were fearful he would break down under 
the tremendous burdens that were upon him, and they urged him to rest. 



232 



The Home Missionary 



April, 1900 



He had carried the double burden of superintendent of Home Missionary 
work and college president for two years of the last five of his life. 

His every energy had been on the strain to get for the college its 
daily bread, and, besides, he had to secure money for troublesome debts 
which threatened to close its doors. 

Dr. Pearsons sent out one of his splendid fifty-thousand-dollar chal- 
lenges, and this man, intrepid, self-sacrificing, stalwart, with the fire of 
a long missionary campaign in his blood, was not the one to pause. 

Although he was warned that there was danger ahead after his 
nearly thirty years of incessant missionary work, he stuck to his post to 

the last. Like the great Moody, 
he had been ambitious to find 
work, and he was willing to do 
it, even unto this sacrifice. 

The soldierly courage, which 
took him into the army from the 
midst of his college course in 
Beloit, kept him in the battle till 
the Great Captain called him out 
for his final furlough and 
honors. 

Beloit College mourns the loss 
of one of her most heroic sons. 
He was a student there in her 
most strenuous days. He caught 
her fine spirit, and was a son she 
was proud to honor with the de- 
gree of Doctor of Divinity. Pro- 
fessor Emerson said of him : " I 
rejoice greatly in him." 

The Home Missionary Soci- 
ety, with which he served ten years as a Home Missionary pastor in 
Minnesota and fifteen years as superintendent of its work in North 
Dakota, places his name on its honor roll of great servants. 

He came to North Dakota in 1882, when there were only four 
Congregational churches in the State. When he was called to join the 
Church Triumphant, there were about ninety. 

Told when he first came to the State that Congregational ists had no 
business in North Dakota, he answered with this purposeful reply: 
" All right ; I am here to make some business." 

The home missionaries remember him as a big-hearted brother 




HENRY CLAY SIMMONS, D.D. 



April, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



233 



superintendent. One of the secretaries said of him : "He was a man 
whose influence had been felt, and he was known from east to west in 
North Dakota. Certainly every Home Missionary church will mourn 
him ; and all good interests, both church and educational, will feel that 
a strong friend has been called away." 

The State of North Dakota, in writing up its history, will place him 
among its bravest champions. He always boasted of its soil, climate, 
people, and institutions; and did as much as any man to attract the 




FARGO COLLEGE, NORTH DAKOTA 



enterprising, prosperous thousands who are finding their homes in that 
great, new State. 

He, more than any other, saved the State from the disgrace of hav- 
ing the Louisiana Lottery fasten its poisonous fangs into the moral life 
of the young commonwealth. 

Fargo College lost in him its principal founder, for it was his pro- 
phetic courage that brought it to birth. To his skill, untiring devotion, 
and hopeful leadership mainly it is due that it did not die, for, like 



234 The Home Missionary April, 1900 

every other missionary college, it had all the usual infantile ills, which 
brought times when its very life seemed to hang as by a thread. Out of 
its debt he led it, and started it well on toward its first hundred thousand 
dollars of endowment. 

His death was a loss to Chicago Seminary, for he had served this 
institution, from which he graduated in 1872, as a member of its Board 
of Directors for several years. 

Dr. Simeon Gilbert said, in writing of him : " I have long known 
and greatly admired and loved him. I have never known a braver man 
than he, or one of more unselfish devotion. North Dakota has never 
had a more valuable citizen. It is a great work which he achieved." 

Of his loss to the noble woman who has shared all this splendid 
service for twenty-five years, and to the four sons and daughter who lose 
the inspiration and joy of his immediate presence, and the circle of kin- 
dred, only those can estimate who have passed through this shadow. 

It is given to but few men to be such an important factor in the 
early settlement of a new State as came to Dr. Simmons. 

It were a great honor to have a hand in organizing its first hundred 
churches, but to add to that Fargo College as his monument — the educa- 
tional gem of the Red River Valley, destined to be the Yale of this same 
great, fertile valley and "the region beyond" — that were, indeed, a double 
honor, which it would be eminently worth any man's while to have ac- 
complished in twenty years of service, even if in its attainment the flame 
of life should have burned out at the comparatively early age of fifty- 
five years. 

This sketch may well close with a few of Dr. Virgin's words : " I 
have loved President Simmons for many years. I have admired his 
zeal, his devotion, his persistence, his heroism, his consecration, his 
ideals. My beloved brother's face is enshrined in my memory, and I 
shall never turn to it without receiving a benediction." That is the her- 
itage he leaves us all, and " though dead yet speaketh." 

They laid his body away in the Fargo Cemetery the day before 
Christmas. 



April, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



235 



HIDDEN TREASURES IN CUBA 

An Up-to-date Bible. 
By Rev. E. P. Herrick, Havana. 
'Tis said that on the hills back of Morro Castle, overlooking the blue 
waves which dash forever at their base, great sums of money were hid- 
den by Spanish captains in days long past. 

These bold buccaneers concealed their doubloons and sailed away, 
never to return, their secret perishing with them. And men search for 
them as, for years, they have dug for the treasures of Captain Kidd. 
Vast sums of money lie under adjacent seas, for treasure ships have 




TRAINING CLASS, HAVANA 

been wrecked from time to time. For these, none can search; but for 
those supposed to be near the Morro, men dig long and patiently, under 
the blazing sun as by the silvery light of the moon, but all in vain — the 
money does not appear. 

There are other searchers for hidden treasures here who are more 
-successful in their quest. The " man with a hoe " or a primitive plow, 
who tills the fertile soil till it laughs in golden harvests, has his reward. 

The fifty-five thousand Cuban children enrolled in the public schools 
of the island applying themselves to their tasks, delving for the hidden 
treasures of knowledge, are sure to garner the precious treasures they 
seek. 



233 The Home Missionary April, 1900 

The one hundred children in our four Sunday-schools in Havana 
who meet each Lord's Day to sing the praises of the Christ and search 
the Scriptures for golden nuggets of Truth are among those who shall 
find that for which they seek. 

The circle of native helpers who are being trained in our mission to 
carry light and life to their benighted people, as they gather to receive 
instruction and study the Scriptures together, are like him of old who, 
finding the hidden treasure in a field, sold all that he had and bought the 
field, and thus owned it all. 

The true searchers for real treasures in Cuba are those who in our 
services, held in five of the wards of this city, as well as in the gatherings 
of other churches in this gay capital, make efforts to obtain the pearl of 
great price, and appropriate the Word of God choicer than gold that 
is tried. And we are glad that our church, as well as our sister churches, 
can aid the Cuban people in their search for treasures which can be 
found and which endure forever. 

It was only a word dropped by the wayside, but eternity alone will 
show its fruitage. A young man from the hills of Asturia — bright, 
cheery ; our talk drifted on to sacred themes. I told him of our need of 
the pure, precious Word of God ; that, while honoring the true saints, 
we must not share God's glory with another. He asked for a Bible, 
and wished to know Its contents. When told of the Old Testament, 
with its accounts of the slow unfolding of the Messianic idea, and the 
New, with its fourfold story of the blessed life, the history of the early 
church, and the deep, doctrinal teachings of the Apostles, closing with 
the visions of the disciple whom Jesus loved, he seemed much interested ; 
but wished to know if I had not a Bible up to date — one that held a 
resume of all the events since the days of the Apostles. I assured him 
that ours was an up-to-date Bible, though not a compendium of modern 
history. He gladly paid for a copy, and is reading it with deep interest ; 
and now, when he salutes me with true Spanish courtesy, he calls me 
master, and tells of his joy in searching for " hid treasures " in the 
wide fields of Divine revelation. May he soon be led in penitent and 
adoring love to the feet of the Great Master ! 

These searchers after God's priceless Truth are multiplying all over 
this Lcautiful island. We have seen them in Guanajoy, in Pinar del 
Rio, where young hearts have drunk in God's Truth as the flowers the 
dew of the sky ; in Cienfuegos, where a Cuban girl said, quaintly, " God 
is high up in Heaven. I can not go there, but God will come down so 
low to hear the prayer of my little heart." 

No one digs beside Morro for gold to-day, but thousands in Cuba 
are searching for the " Pearl of Great Price." 



April, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



237 



APPOINTMENTS FOR 



DECEMBER, 1899 



Not in commission last year 

Culver, Charles A., Center Chain, Fraser 
and Wilbert, Minn. 

Curtis, N. R., Steamboat Springs, Colo. 

Dora, William H., Globeville, Colo. 

Gilman, George F., Starkville, Colo. 

Halbert, Leroy A., Topeka, Kan. 

Helming, Oscar C, Indianapolis, Ind. 

James, Benjamin, Port Angeles, Wash. 

Jones, Richard M., Rainier and Scappoose, 
Ore. 

Kirkpatrick, West Indianapolis, Ind. 

Peterson, Karl E., St. Cloud and Sauk Rap- 
ids, Minn. 

Philipsen, Chr., Racine, Wis. 

Sanford, John I., Aberdeen, So. Dak. 

Slasor, Leroy V., Natchez, Wash. 

Smith, J. H. P.., East Duluth and West Du- 
luth, Minn. 

Wismer, Ernest L., Taylor, Neb. 

Re-commissioned 

Bascom, George S., Oriska, No. Dak. 
Billings, Charles S., Evangelist, Cal. 
Brakemeyer, Gustavus L., Friend, Neb. 
Brown, Paul W., Joplin, Mo. 
Burkhardt, Paul, Springfield, Mo. 



Burr, Huber, Wyandotte, Cal. 

Bushnell, Campbell W., Kalama, Wash. 

Edwards, Miss Rosine M., Tolt, Wash. 

Full, Webster, Perkins, Okla. 

Goshen, Elmer I., Ogden, Utah. 

Grieb, Edmund, Seattle, Wash. 

Ham, Richard K, Fitchburg and Ocean 

View, Cal. 
Jenney, E. W., General Miss., in So. Dak. 
Jones, Jay J., Lake Preston, So. Dak. 
Lindsay, George, Whitewater, Colo. 
Marsh, George, Pittsburg, Pa. 
Nelson, G. W., Ashland, Ore. 
O'Brien, James P., Penn Valley and Kansas 

City, Mo. 
Oehler, Fred H., New Richland, Minn. 
Parker, Fred W., Albany, Ore. 
Plumb, Marcus fl., Los Angeles, Cal. 
Pope, Joseph, Columbus and Laurel, Mont. 
Reid, Mathew D., Villa Park, Cal. 
Smith, Mrs. Esther, East Duluth and West 

Duluth, Minn. 
Stevens, J. L., Iberia, Eldon, and Tuscum- 

bia, Mo. 
Tomlin, David R., Mitchell, So. Dak. 
Waldrop, Isaac M., Fairview, Western, and 

Alanthus, Kan. 
Walton, James A., Beulah, So. Dak. 
Williams, William T., Aten, Neb. 



RECEIPTS FOR 

DECEMBER, 1899 

For account of receipts by State Auxiliary Societies, see pages 258 to 267 



MAINE— $1,127.67; of which legacy 
$1,000. 

Bangor, Y. P. S. C. E, Welsh 

Ch., by J. Williams $200 

Gray, by Mrs. M. Haskell 200 

Kennebunk, Union Ch., by F. W. 

Nason 58 72 

Kennebunkport, Second, by W. 

R. Wheelwright 10 00 

Machias, Centre Street Ch., by 

W. W. Bradbury 3 45 

Portland, St. Lawrence Ch., by 

G. L. Gerrish 1500 

Ladies of Bethel Ch., by Miss 

M. E. Southworth 29 50 

Thomaston, by Miss H. E. Till- 

son 2 00 

Wells, Legacy of Barak Maxwell, 
by Warren B. Maxwell and 

Arthur A. Maxwell, Exs 1,000 00 

First, by N. M. Bailey 500 

NEW HAMPSHIRE— $122.53; of 
which legacy $19.50. 

Gilmanton, Miss M. F. Page 55 

Hancock, by L. W. Goodhue 5 75 



Hanover, S. A. Brown $1000 

Junior Endeavor Soc, by Rev. 

W. G. Puddefoot 13 71 

Dr. W. T. Smith and family, by 
Rev. W. G. Puddefoot 8 50 

Hooksett, by W. S. A. Miller. . 10 50 

Keene, S 5 30 

Mason, Estate of Mrs. L. A. 
Barnes, by L. D. Stevens 1950 

New Ipswich, J. E. F. Marsh, a 
thank offering 10 00 

Peterboro, Extra-Cent-a-Day Band 
of the Union Cong. Ch., by 
Miss J. M. Buckminster 11 91 

Pittsfield, by Dea. . M. H. Nut- 
ter 26 81 

VERMONT— $944.00; of which leg- 
acy, $636.00. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. R. 
MacKinnon, Treas. 

For Salary Fund: 

Clarendon, Y. P. S. C. E 1 00 

Grafton 3 °° 

Highgate Centre 2 00 

Saxton's River 5 00 



2 3 8 



The Home Missionary- 



April, 1900 



Tunbridge 

Waterbury 

Westminster, West 

West Rutland 

Windham 

Brandon, Y. P. S. C. E., by H. 

E. Hemenway, for Alaska 

Burlington, First, by M. H. 

Stone 

Randolph, Mrs. F. S. Carter.... 
Royalton, Est. of Susan H. Jones, 

by J. R. Woods, Ex 

Thetford Centre, E. L. Maynard. 

Vergennes, by A. Ross 

Waterbury, Y. P. S. C. E., by C. 

Wells, for Alaska 



$2 00 
5 oc 

3 00 
S 00 

4 00 



30 00 



240 00 
S 00 

636 00 
3 00 
10 00 



Saundersville, Union Ch., by D. 

Howie 

Saxonville, Edwards Ch., by Miss 

S. H. Goldthwaite 

South Deerfield, in full, to 

const. Dea. C. Stebbins a L. 

M., by C. B. Tilton 

South Hadley, Mt. Holyoke Col- 
lege, by Miss F. M. Hazen.. 

Y. P. S. C. E., by E. Puring- 
ton, for Alaska 

Silver Circle, Mrs. L. H. Por- 
ter 

South Hadley Falls, G 

Templeton, Trinitarian, by Mrs. 

M. A. J. Hoyt 

Townsend Centre, Miss M. E. 

Patch 



$6 90 
17 54 



S 00 
100 00 



7° 



MASSACHUSETTS— $4,561.92; of 
which legacies, $92.30. 

Mass. Home Miss. So., by Rev. 

E. B. Palmer, Treas 

By request of donors, of which 
for Salary Fund, $354.82; for 
Alaska, $17 



Woman's H. M. A., Miss L. D. 
White, Treas.: 

For Salary Fund 

Dorchester, Extra Cent-a-Day 
Band of the Second, for Cuba. 



Amherst, Y. P. S. C. E. of the 
North Ch., by A. Parsons 

Blandford, First, by W. E. Hins- 
dale 

Boston, W. A. Wilde, for Salary 
Fund 

E. I. Samuel 

Brockton, First, by J. T. Burke. 

Cambridgeport, A Friend, Christ- 
mas offering 

Chelsea, Dr. Underhill, by Rev. 
W. G. Puddefoot 

Cummington, by Mrs. J. L. Por- 
ter, in part, to const. Rev. L. 
T. Reed a L. M 

Dracut, Central Ch., by W. H. 
Stickney 

Easthampton, Payson Ch., by 
H. L. Clark, to const. Mrs. 

F. P. Newkirk, Miss E. Pren- 
tice, Miss E. Taintor, and Miss 
A. Severance L. Ms 

Egremont, South Ch., by R. C. 
Taft 

Greenfield, Est. of R. W. Cook, 
by H. W. Hubbard, trustee 

Hadley, Est. of J. B. Porter, by 
W. P. Porter 

Haverhill, Friends 

Lawrence, Est. of Mrs. M. T. 
Benson, by Mrs. J. L. Brew- 
ster 

Ludlow, A. G. C 

Monson, by E. F. Morris 

Mystic, Y. P. S. C. E., by Rev. 
J. Barstow, for Cuban Work... 

Northampton, Dorcas Soc. of the 
First, by Mrs. J. E. Clark, for 

Salary Fund 

Edwards Ch., by G. L. Metcalf. 
A. L. Williston 

North Wilbraham, Grace Union 
Ch., by H. M. Cutler 



2,500 00 

371 82 
2,871 82 



400 


00 


10 


00 


410 


00 


10 


00 


35 3i 


25 


00 


10 


00 


40 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


28 


s<s 


7 


s 4 



200 


00 


10 


15 


39 90 


32 40 
13 00 


20 

10 
30 


00 
00 
65 



50 00 
106 09 
300 00 



RHODE ISLAND— $35. 

Central Falls, Y. P. S. C. E, by 
L. R. Seal, for Alaska 

East Providence, Newman Ch., 
by W. W. Ellis 



CONNECTICUT — $3,272.11; o f 
which legacies, $1,202.50. 

Miss. Soc. of Conn., W. W. 
Jacobs, Treas., of which for 
Cuba, $2 

Received in April for Western 
work 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. 

A. W. Moore, Treas.: 
East Hampton, Aux., by Mrs. 

E. H. Bevin, for Salary 

Fund 

Enfield, Mrs. Chapin, by Mrs. 

R. F. King, for Salary Fund. 
Fairfield, Aux., by Mrs. F. H. 

Brewer, for Salary Fund 

Hartford, First, by Mrs. H. B. 
Langdon, special 

First, Jr. Aux., by Mrs. M. 
W. Jacobs, special 

South Ch., Sewing Soc, by 

Mrs. C. E. Billings, special. 

Kensington, Aux., by Mrs. F. 

N. Taylor, for Salary Fund. 

Mrs. Bartlett, for Salary Fund 
Ridgefield, Ladies, by Mrs. E. 

A. Hoyt, for Salary Fund... 
Somersville, by Mrs. W. H. 

Billings, for Salary Fund 

Thompson, by Miss M. M. 

Knight, for Salary Fund 

Wallingford, L. B. Soc, by 

Miss J. Doolittle, for Salary 

Fund 

West Hartford, by Mrs. W. H. 

Hall, for Salary Fund 

Bethany, by P. H. Rolph 

Bristol, S. S. of the First, by 

Miss J. E. Beckwith 

East Woodstock, by J. M. Paine 

Ellsworth, by C. C. Dean 

Goshen, Lebanon, by Rev. M. 

Burr 

Greenwich, Second, by H. O. 
Child 

Second, by Dr. E. N. Jadd.... 

Guilford, by E. W. Leete 

Hadlyme, R. E. Hungerford. .. . 



10 00 
25 00 



354 06 
675 00 



28 19 
5 00 

10 00 

10 00 
5 00 

15 00 

3 00 
5 00 

5 10 

14 50 

15 00 

100 00 
10 00 

225 79 

2 00 

20 00 
24 48 

8 87 

9 50 

27 75 
18 41 
55 00 
10 00 



April, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



239 



By C. H. Rich $5 56 

Hebron, First, by F. N. Gillette.. 14 50 

Kent, First, by E. B. Eaton 6 52 

Meriden, Center Ch., by W. F. 

Smith 50 00 

Middlefield, Y. P. S. C. E, by 

Miss L. C. Miller 7 27 

Middletown, Westfieid C. E., by 

Miss A. M. Wilcox 5 00 

Milford, First, by F. J. Bosworth. 8 00 

Mystic, by E. Williams 1000 

New Britain, Est. of S. C. Stan- 
ley 7SS 00 

New Hartford, by Rev. F. S. 

Brewer, special 25 00 

New Haven, Cong. Ch., of Yale 

University, by M. F. Tyler. . 251 66 

Ladies' H. M. Soc. of the First 
Ch. of Christ, by M. E. Mer- 
rick 250 00 

S. S. of the United Ch., by 
F. A. Smith 30 00 

Y. P. S. C. E. of the United 
Ch., by H. M. Osborn, for 

Alaska 10 00 

Newington, by E. W. Atwood.. 6349 

New Preston Village, by D. 

Burnham 95 25 

North Greenwich, by S. C. Mead. 34 90 
North Windham, by O. E. Col- 
burn 6 87 

Norwich, Ladies, by Mrs. W. 

Carr, special 18 14 

Roxbury, by E. W. Preston 20 10 

Salisbury, Legacy of Mrs. S. D. 

Holley, by J. P. Mathews, Ex. 447 50 

Mrs. H. W. A. Goddard 1 00 

Stafford Springs, by W. H. 

Heald 37 7* 

Stanwich, by L. M. Close 17 12 

South Manchester, Center S. S., 

by W. B. Spencer 1066 

South Windsor, First, by E. A. 

Farnham 41 18 

Stratford, S. S. Helping Hand, 

by Mrs. S. A. Talbot 1000 

Talcottville, Y. P. S. C. E, by 

D. Ferguson, for Alaska 1000 

Terryville, Friends 40 00 

Voluntown and Sterling, by C. 

H. Kenney 5 75 

Waterbury, Second, by J. A. 

Boyd 201 69 

West Avon, by J. A. Hawley, for 

Salary Fund 15 00 

Westchester, A Friend, a Christ- 
mas present, special 5 00 

Winchester, by E. B. Bronson.. 1 38 

Windsor, C. E. Soc, by H. W. 

Strickland 5 00 



NEW YORK— $2,290.53. 

Received by William Spalding, 

Treas. : 
Buffalo, Plymouth Mission.... 

Brooklyn, Penn. Ave S. S 

Ellington 

Elmira, St. Luke's 

Fairport, Mrs. C. E. Reeves's 

S. S. class of boys 

Grand Island 

Hamilton, R. Woodruff 

Mt. Sinai, C. E. Soc 

North Java 

Ogdensburg 

Sinclairville .' 

Spencerport,- C. E'. 

Syracuse, Good Will Ch., $20.27; 
S. S., $5.36; Jr. C. E., $5.. 



South Avenue 
E. Curtis 



4 5° 


5 


00 


7 


20 


4 


00 


5 


00 


2 


00 


1 


00 


10 


00 


1 


68 


21 


06 


20 


00 


15 


00 



30 63 



$10 00 

5 00 

142 07 

Woman's H. M. Union, N. Y., 
Mrs. J. J. Pearsall, Treas.: 

Brooklyn, Parkville, L. A. S. 7 50 

Park Ch 9 00 

Homer, Aux 19 50 

New York, Broadway Taber- 
nacle, Soc. for Women's 

Work 40 00 

Oswego 10 00 

S. S 22 00 

Poughkeepsie 25 00 

Riverhead 20 82 

153 91 

Aquebogue, by G. L. Wells 950 

Brooklyn, Tompkins Ave., by P. 

Palmer 1,000 00 

Y. P. S. C. E. of the Tomp- 
kins Ave. Ch., by P. Palmer, 

Treas., for Alaska 2000 

South Ch., by E. B. Olney.... 18609 

Park Ch., by Mrs. E. Lewis.. 1 100 
Beecher Memorial, by Rev. 

D. B. Pratt 10 00 

W. P. Symonds 25 00 

J- R 3 00 

A Friend 1000 

Buffalo, N. Y., First, by R. K. 

Strickland, to const, a L. M.. 50 00 

Buffalo, R. W. Bancroft 3000 

Clifton Springs, Miss J. M. Gil- 
man 50 00 

Danby, Ch., $6.80, S. S., $3.20, 

by L. H. Hollister 10 00 

Glen Spey, by J. F. Whitney 2 00 

Ithaca, First, by S. D. Sawyer.. 83 76 

Jamestown, by F. R. Moody 22642 

Lysander, by W. C. Van Doren.. 21 00 
Mt. Vernon, First, $9.45; S. S., 

$7.19, by J. M. Hurd 16 64 

Munnsville, bv S. P. Moore 7 55 

Newark Valley, by Mrs. H. Win- 
ship 19 00 

New Hartford, W. E. Mather 5 00 

New York City, Broadway Tab- 
ernacle, by N. C. Fisher, 

Add'l 50 00 

Bedford Park, by W. R. Post.. 8 51 

Welsh Ch 1000 

G. S. Hickok, for Cuba 1000 

Oswego, by W. B. Couch 43 52 

Owego, by C. E. Livermore.. .. 1500 

Perry Center, by W. H. Selden. 2 10 
Rensselaer City, First, by G. H. 

Mayer 1395 

Rensselaer Falls, Y. P. S. C. E, 

by C. L. Graves, for Alaska... 10 00 

Sayville, S. S., by G. Edwards.. 18 76 
Steuben, First, Welsh, by Miss 

R. Thomas 5 75 

Utica, Bethesda Welsh, by W. 

W. George 10 00 

Warsaw, S. S., by H. L. Martin. 11 00 

NEW JERSEY— $2,511.82; of which 
legacy, $2,365.12. 

Bound Brook, by P. V. Bergen.. 87 00 
Cedar Grove, by Rev. B. F. 

Bradford 16 00 

Chester, Y. P. S. C. E., by C. F. 

Wood 10 00 

Jersey City, First, Hill Branch, 

by M. H. Kelsey 1695 

Newark, net proceeds of bequest 

of Mrs. J. C. V. A. Jones 2,365 12 



240 



The Home Missionary 



April, 1900 



Perth Amboy, Swedish Ch., by 
J. A. Lovgren $4 75 

Vineland, Ch. of the Pilgrims, by 
W. C. Sexton 12 00 

PENNSYLVANIA — $334.51; of 
which legacy, $200. 

Cambridge Springs, by Mrs. C. 

F. Chamberlain 10 00 

Ebensburg, First, by C. T. Rob- 
erts 20 00 

Farmington, Estate of Alfred 

Cowles, by M. E. Cowles, Ex. . 200 00 
Mt. Carmel, First, by Rev. R. N. 

Harris 1006 

Philadelphia, Pilgrim, by B. H. 

Phile, Jr 340 

Plymouth, Elm Ch., by Rev. J. 

T. Matthews 3 00 

Ridgway, First, by W. H. Oster- 

hout 56 00 

Scranton, Providence, Welsh, by 

Rev. R. S. Jones 1500 

Warren, Swedish Beth. Ch., by 

Rev. F. Nilson 3 05 

Wilkes Barre, Puritan Ch., by 

M. R. Morgan 1400 

MARYLAND— $3. 

Frostburg, by Rev. G. W. 
Moore '. 3 00 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA— 

$195.04. 

Washington, First, by W. Lam- 
born 45 04 

S. S. of the Firs*, by A. H. 
Howell, for Alaska 25 00 

In memory of Mrs. Walter Pit- 
kin, by W. S. Pitkin 50 00 

R. Dunning 7500 

GEORGIA— $30. 

Woman's Missionary Union, by 
Rev. J. F. Blackburn 3000 

ALABAMA— $2. 

Shelby, First, by E. E. Scott, for 
Cuba 1 00 

Lightwood, Union Ch. and Cen- 
tral, Equality Ch., by Rev. A. 
C. Wells 1 00 

LOUISIANA— $5. 

Welsh and China, by Rev. J. B. 
Fisher 500 

FLORIDA— $14.63. 

Mt. Dora, by R. C. Tremain.... 863 

Sanford, People's Ch., by Rev. 

C. Campbell 6 00 

[Correction: Interlachen, Fla., Mrs. W. 
D. Brown, $100, should read Mrs. W. D. 
Brown, $100, of which $50 from Rev. W. D. 
Brown, deceased. Erroneously acknowl- 
edged in January number, October receipts.] 



NEW MEXICO— $2. 

Gallup, First, by Rev. P. 
Simpkin 



$2 00 



TEXAS— $6.85. 
Paris, First, by Rev. L. Rees. 



TENNESSEE— $10. 

Knoxville, Pilgrim, by J. R. Wil- 
liams 



OHIO— $823.74; of which legacy, 
$15- 

Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser, 

D.D.: 
Ashtabula, Finnish, by Rev. K. 

A. Lindroos 4 00 

Cincinnati, Storrs, by Rev. A. 

A. Andridge 2 25 

Lawrence St. Ch. and C. E., 
by B. Davies 20 00 

Rev. and Mrs. A. A. An- 
dridge, in full, to const. 
Rev. A. A. Andridge L. M. 75 00 

Miss E. E. Butler 100 

Cleveland, Swedish, by Rev. D. 

Marcelius 4 00 

Hough Ave., by L. W. Par- 
sons 29 93 

Cyril Chapel, by Rev. John 

Musil 2000 

Geneva, by S. S. Searle 2664 

Hartford, by J. M. Jones 800 

Hudson, by Miss E. E. Met- 

calf 4 06 

Isle St. George, by Rev. D. C. 

McNair 200 

Jefferson, Kingdom Extension 

Soc, $15; Intermediate C. E., 

$5, in full, to const. Mrs. 

L. J. Cuethi a L. M 20 00 

Kelley's Island, by Rev. D. C. 

McNair 1200 

Kirtland, by E. M. Woodard... 3 75 

Lexington Y. P. S. C. E., by 

Miss Ida George 500 

Lodi, S. S. Christmas gift, by 

Julia Schempp 5 75 

Medina, Ch., $237.26; C. E., 

$10, by H. A. Horn, in full, 

to const. Rev. J. Hill, Mrs. 

C. Calvert, M. H. Coulter, 

Mabel Harrington, and R. O. 

Kindig L. Ms 247 26 

Mt. Vernon, by John T. Bar- 
ber 44 39 

North Bloomfield, Ch., $8; La- 
dies' Soc, $1, by Miss M. J. 

McAdoo 9 00 

Oberlin, Second, by C. T. 

Beckwith 43 01 

Second, Rev. A. D. Barber 
D.D., by Rev. H. M. Ten- 

ney, D.D 1000 

Painesville, First, by Dr. E. D. 

Whitney 23 35 

Saybrook, by Stella E. Maltby. 4 00 

Springfield, First, by H. L. 

Sawyer 15 5 2 

Twinsburg, Add'l, by O. O. 

Kelsey 100 

Wellington, by A. R. Palmer.. 6621 

York, by Rev. L. W. Mahn 5 00 

Rev. C. W. Grupe 100 

Rev. W. F. McMillen 200 

Walter A. Snow 2 00 



6 85 



717 12 



April, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



241 



Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser, 

D.D., Treas. Bohemian Board, 

Cleveland : 

Cleveland, First, S. S., by J. 
Baym . . : $14 12 

Mt. Vernon, by John T. Bar- 
ber 3 00 

17 12 

Atwater, Est. of J. M. Alden, on 

account, by G. Seymour 15 00 

Blues Creek, Y. P. S. C. E., by 

E. Gaston 3 00 

Castalia, Ch., $3; C. E., $3.50, by 

T. Jordan 6 50 

Cincinnati, F. E. Blunden 1000 

Conneaut, S. S., by Mrs. T. S. 

Norton 500 

Mansfield, S. S. of the First, by 

C. Hammond, special 1500 

Oberlin, First, Mrs. M. A. Keep. 30 00 

H. B. Hall S 00 



INDIANA— $60.9,0. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. A. 
D. Davis, Treas. : 

Indianapolis, Brightwood 3 00 

Mayflower 24 90 

Trinity 2 50 

Fort Wayne 5 00 

35 40 

Alexandria, First, by Rev. J. C. 

Smith 9 5° 

Michigan City, by Rev. M. E. 
Eversz, Ger 16 00 



ILLINOIS— $85.93; of which leg- 
acy, $74-93- 

Buda, Estate of J. F. Hyde, by 
H. T. Lay, trustee 74 93 

Fall Creek, by Rev. M. E. 
Eversz, German 10 00 

Princeton, A Friend 1 00 



MISSOURI— $182.40. 

Received by Rev. A. K. Wray: 

Breckenridge 

Kansas City, Clyde Ch., Y. P. 
S. C. E 

Aurora, by H. H. Elliott 

Bonne Terre, First, by H. D. 

Evans 

Iberia, Eldon, and Tuscombia, 

by Rev. J. L. Stevens 

Kansas City, Ivanhoe Park Ch., 

by Rev. L. Warren 

Riverdale, by Mrs. J. A. Wasson 
St. Joseph, Tabernacle Ch., by 

W. E. Bragg 

St. Louis, Compton Hill, by 
J. E. Cowan 

Hyde Park Ch., by H. F. Small 

Memorial Ch., by Rev. F. Fos- 
ter 9 85 

MICHIGAN— $2. 
Noble, Mrs. H. Bogardus 200 



3i 85 


S 00 


3685 


11 25 


17 25 


4 36 


1 00 
4 10 


60 22 


19 57 
17 95 



WISCONSIN— $20.05. 

Clear Lake, Swedish Ch., by Rev. 

J. Pe terson $ 95 

Curtiss, German Zion's Ch., by 

Rev. J. Schaerer 4 00 

Merrill, Emanuel Scand. Ch., by 

Rev. S. M. Andrewson 3 10 

Tomahawk, First, by Rev. S. M. 

MacNeill 12 00 

IOWA— $10.65. 

Dubuque, " C," First Ch 1000 

Eldon, Mrs. E. R. Allen 65 



MINNESOTA— $429.57; of which 
legacy, $50. 

Received by Rev. J. H. Morley: 

Ada 12 79 

Belgrade 3 99 

Ellsworth 4 94 

Kanaranzi 2 06 

Mankato 3 00 

Marshall 3 00 

Morris 8 84 

New Paynesville 4 90 

Park Rapids 6 00 

Rochester 43 45 

St. Paul, Cyril Chapel 1500 

Plymouth 30 81 

St. Anthony Park 13 73 

Stillwater 6 42 

Wadena 13 35 

Zumbro Falls 1 00 

172 38 

Burtrum, $2.25; Grey Eagle, 
$3.02, and Pillsbury, $3, by Rev. 

E. E. Cram 

Cannon Falls, First, by C. Gress. 
Crookston, First, by W. E. Slo- 

cum 

Graceville, by Rev. R. Watt 

Mantorville, First, by Rev. W. C. 
A. Wallar 

Marshall, by Rev. G. M. Morri- 
son 

Medford, by Mrs. H. D. Adams. 

Minneapolis, Rev. L. H. Hal- 
lock, Add'l 

Lowry Hill, by D. D. Web- 
ster 

St. Paul, Plymouth, by H. E. 
Osgood 

Silver Lake, Bohemian Free Re- 
formed Ch., Thanksgiving off- 
ering, by J. S'. Jerabek 

Winona, From Est. of G. F. 
Hubbard, by G. H. Payne 

Winona, Scand. Ch., by Rev. H. 

F. Josephson 

Zumbrota, First, by B. Olson 



KANSAS— $407.59. 

Received by Rev. A. C. Hogbin, 

Treas. : 

Bala 4 00 

Clay Centre 8 00 

Jr. C. E., $1; S. S., $2.50 3 50 

Dover, Harvest Festival 3 15 

Highland, Harvest Festival.... 2000 

Linwood 40 00 

Olathe 13 01 

Sabetha 40 00 

Seneca 13 00 

Tonganoxie 15 80 



8 
4 


27 
01 


3 

25 


50 
00 


3 


20 


9 32 
6 00 


5 


00 


n 


26 


13 04 


105 


00 


50 


00 


1 


5i 



242 



The Home Missionary 



April, 1900 



Topeka, First $100 00 NORTH DAKOTA-$i 4 i.22 

Twelve Mile 

Udall 

Wakarusa 



23 38 
S 00 

2 00 



290 84 

Carbondale, by Rev. J. A. Nield. 12 00 
Netawaka, by Rev. F. G. Mitch- 
ell 5 75 

Oneida, by Rev. C. A. Richard- 
son 1300 

Paola, Plymouth, by Rev. H. D. 

Leland 30 00 

Powhattan, by Rev. J. VV. Cone.. 15 00 

Wabaunsee, First, by J. F. VVil- 
lard 41 00 

[Erratum: Kensiagton, by Rev. W. H. 
Merrill, $23.98, acknowledged in November 
receipts, should read: Athol, $15.10; Ken- 
sington, $8.88.] 

[Erratum: Muscotah, S. S., $5.80, ac- 
knowledged in May receipts, by Rev. A. C. 
Hogbin, Treas., should be credited to High- 
land S. S.] 



Received by Rev. G. J. Powell: 

Cooperstown 

Dazey, Union Ch 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. 
J. M. Fisher, Treas.: 

Crary 

Fargo, First 

Harwood 

Inkster 

May ville 

Niagara 

Wahpeton, Busy Bee Band 



Fessenden, $7.53; Harvey, $8.25, 

by Rev. H. E. Compton 

Inkster, Ch., $11.54; &• S., $1.44, 

and Orr, $7.56, by Rev. C. A. 

Mack 

Oberon, $21.25; and Buchanan, 

$2.15, by Rev. E. E. Saunders. 



$28 00 
7 00 

35 00 



2 


00 


14 

8 
7 


10 

00 


5 


00 


3 9° 
6 00 


46 


50 


IS 


;s 


20 


54 


23 40 



NEBRASKA— $734.56. 

Received by H. A. Snow, Treas. : 

Beatrice, Woman's Soc 

Campbell 

Trenton, Y. P. S. C. E 

Upland 

Waverly 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. 
C. C. Hall, Treas 

Clay Center 

Lincoln, First 

Omaha, Plymouth 



Clay Center, by Rev. J. E. Storm 

Cowles, by Rev. S. Deakin 

Crete, by H. H. Hosford 

Curtis, by C. W. Preston 

Fairmont, Y. P. S. C. E., by 

C. S. Chandler, for Alaska 

Ft. Calhoun, by Rev. D. S. Horn- 

saker 

Friend, Bro. Green, by Rev. M. 

E. Eversz, D.D 

Genoa, by J. Parker 

Indianola, by M. Powell 

Inland, by D. Stimbert 

Lincoln, Emanuel Ch., by Rev. 
C. fi. Peterson 

Vine Street Ch., by C. A. Ly- 
man 

Ogalalla, Ch., $10; Union, $5, by 

Rev. G. W. Knapp 

Omaha, Hillside Ch., by Rev. J. 

Flook 

Palisade, First, by R. J. Ven- 

num 

Pierce, First, by Rev. C. D. 

Gearhart 

Riverton, Ch., $11; Y. P. S. C. 

E., $5, and Juniors, $4, by Rev. 

S. Williams 

Superior, by Rev. M. E. Eversz, 

German 

Wallace, First, by Rev. I. Mc- 

Rae 

Weeping Water, $54.11; S. S., 

t[0.8o; Junior C. fi., 50c, by 
. L Hanford 

West Cedar Valley, by Rev. O. 
E. Ticknor 



5 


00 


5 


00 


12 


70 


2 


21 


18 


04 


231 


oS 


3 


00 


38 


50 


13 29 


329 42 


16 


34 


6 


.SO 


95 


85 


27 


13 


3 


Si 


15 


00 




50 


4 


75 


27 


0(1 


15 


00 


4 


50 


35 


00 


15 


00 


20 


00 


1 


25 


8 


75 


20 


00 


5 


65 


8 


7i 


65 


50 


9 


20 



SOUTH DAKOTA-$i 74 .75. 

Received by Rev. T. L. Riggs: 

Cheyenne River 

Little Moreau 

Moreau River 

Oahe 

Virgin Creek 

Received by Rev. M. E. Eversz: 

Mound City, German Ch 

Parkston, German 

Academy, by Rev. L. E. Cam- 
field 

Bowdle, Israel's and Johanne's, 
German Chs., and Blumenthal, 
German. No. Dak., by Rev. H. 
Baumann 

Clark, by Rev. U. Parks 

Highmore, First, by Rev. H. L. 
Forbes 

Oacoma, by Rev. E. I. Grinnell. 

Ree Heights, by Mrs. I. Wat- 
kins 

Sioux Falls, German Eman. Ch., 
by Rev. J. Lich 

South Shore, $10; Troy, $5; Ma- 
zeppa, $5: A Friend, $10, by 
Rev. P. Winter 

Springfield, by Rev. D. J. Perrin. 

Tyndall, German, by Rev. J. Sat- 
tler 

Winfred, $1.74; Freedom, $1.81, 
by Rev. J. Alderson 



COLORADO— $47.96. 

Cope, by Rev. H. Sanderson 

Creede, by Rev. O. L. Corbin.. 

Elyria, Pilgrim Ch., by Rev. C. 
B. Wells 

Flagler, First, by Rev. C. W. 
Smith 

Greeley, Park Ch., by J. B. Pat- 
ton 

Otis, by Rev. G. Dungan 



3 


4& 


2 


00 


1 


57 


2 


13 




22 


9 


9S 


25 


00 


■ 3° 


00 



55 00 



10 


00 


10 


00 


9 07 


3 


00 


7 50 


5 


00 


30 


00 


9 


15 


20 


00 


3 55 



2 

4 


05 
00 


I 


3i 


7 50 


28 

5 


10 
00 



April, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



243 



WYOMING— $40. 
Cheyenne, First, by E. R. Black. 

MONTANA— $37.85. 



Laurel, by Rev. J. Pope 

Red Lodge, Ch., $28.05; S. S., 
$6.80, by Rev. W. H. Watson. 



IDAHO-$ 3 375- 

Pocatello, First, by Rev. G. H. 

Perry 

Woman's Missionary Union, 
Mrs. L. H. Johnston, 
Treas. : 
Challis 

CALIFORNIA— $540.05. 

Received by Rev. J. K. Harri- 
son: 

Duncan Mill, Y. P. S. C. E.. 

Mary J. Stewart, Est 

Palo Alto 

Plymouth Ave., Y. P. S. C. E. 

Rev. J. C. Holbrook, D. D 

Rio Vista, Y. P. S. C. E 

Sacramento, First 

San Francisco, First, by W. H. 
M. U 

Received by itev. J. L. Maile: 
From individuals, special 

Byron, by Rev. D. Goodsell 

Little Shasta, by Rev. G. M. 
Dexter 

Los Angeles, First, by Rev. J. L. 

Maile 

Mrs. O. S. Adams, by R. E. 
Adams 

Paso Robles, Plymouth Ch., by 
Rev. S. D. Belt 

Poway, by A. Chapin 

Rosedale, by Rev. W. H. Robin- 
son 

OREGON— $226.83; of which leg- 
acy, $125. 

Received by Or. Home Miss. 
Soc, I. A. Macrum, Tr. : 
Portland, First, by C. H. Gay- 
lord 



$40 00 

3 00 
34 85 

21 65 



I 


94 


35 


00 


2 


50 


5 


00 


3 


12 


S 


00 


203 90 


62 


20 


318 66 


85 


00 


2 


SO 


22 


So 


88 


14 


S 


00 


S 


00 


8 


25 



65 95 



Salem, First, by W. Staiger $14 13 

80 08 

Clackamas, Est. of Samuel Shep- 
herd, by A. Mather, Ex 125 00 

Corvallis, First, by Rev. P. S. 
Knight 3 00 

Lorella, by Rev. J. W. Bryant.. 75 

New Era, St. John's Ch., Ger- 
man, by Rev. M. E. Eversz... 200 

Portland, German Ch., by Rev. 
J. Legler 6 00 

Shubal, St. Peter's Ch., German, 
by Rev. M. E. Eversz 1000 

WASHINGTON— $166.59. 

Ahtanum, by Rev. W. L. Daw- 
son 10 85 

Edmonds, First, by Rev. W. A. 
Arnold 5 00 

Endicott, German Ch., by Rev. 
J. M. Preiss 1050 

Everett, E. N. Judd 400 

Pataha City, First, by Rev. H. 
M. Painter 4 75 

Ritzville, First German Ch., by 

Rev. A. J. Bailey 2500 

Y. P. S. C. E. of the First, by 
Mrs. W. Olmstead 1000 

Seattle, Plymouth Ch., by Rev. 
A. J. Bailey 86 49 

Tacoma, East Ch., by Rev. W. 
G. Olinger 5 00 

Spanaway, by Rev. H. Gregory.. 5 00 

Unknown 2 10 

Anonymous 2 10 

Dec. Receipts: Contributions $13,85675 

Legacies 5.78035 

Interest 443 00 

Annuity 500 00 

Home Missionary 21 90 

Total $20,602 00 

Miss. Soc. of Connecticut: 
Received in April, for Western 
work 675 00 

$21,277 00 

Erroneously acknowledged in 
March contributions, Wis 256 

$21,274 44 



APPOINTMENTS FOR 



JANUARY, 1900 



Not in commission last year 

Bandy, Paul S., Ft. Calhoun, Neb. 
Bradstreet, Albert E., Spring Valley and 

Jamul, So. Cal. 
Brown, Amasa A., Hot Springs, So. Dak. 
Buswell, Jesse, Wessington Springs, So. 

Dak. 
Goodheart, Simon F., De Smet, So. Dak. 
Happel, John B., Superior, Neb. 
Keniston, George N., Hennessey, Okla. 
Loring, Levi, Lake Park, Minn. 
Luce, I. J., San Francisco, Cal. 
Moor, David Y., Williston, No. Dak. 
Neilan, Joseph D., Willow Springs, Mo. 
Nelson, Charles E., Clintonville, Wis. 
Oakey, James, Robbinsdale, Minn. 
Ogg, W. D., Chokio, Minn. 



Rees, Rees J., Scranton, Pa. 
Severance, Claude M., Baltimore, Md. 
Shults, J. K., Campbell and Tintah, Minn. 
Williams, Charles W., Avalon, So. Cal. 

Re-commissioned 

Adams, Clinton B., Philadelphia, Pa. 

Asadoorian, Avedis M., Centerville, So. Dak. 

Barnes, Albert E., Clearwater and Hasty, 
Minn. 

Barrie, N. C, District Missionary in North- 
ern Minnesota and North Dakota. 

Bassett, F. H., Park Rapids, Minn. 

Bates, John M., Wakonda, So. Dak. 

Beebe, Julius R., New Rockford, No. Dak. 

Coate, Robert M., Erwin, So. Dak. 

Colp, D. G., Kragness, Minn. 

Cookman, Isaac, Newkirk, Okla. 



244 



The Home Missionary 



April, 1900 



Cox, E. H., Swanville, Minn. 

Davy, James J., Cando, No. Dak. 

Deakin, Samuel, Cowles, Neb. 

Egerland, F., General Missionary in Neb. 

Essig, William F., Shubel and New Era, 

Ore. 
Fellows, C. B., General Missionary in Minn. 
Forbes, Harry L., Highmore, So. Dak. 
Foster, R. B., Okarche, Okla. 
Gay, William M., Pomona, Fla. 
Halbert, Leroy A., Tennessee Town, Kan. 
Hamerson, John, Canton, So. Dak. 
Hartley, John, Perry, Okla. 
Hassell, Richard B., Everett, Wash. 
Husband, Charles H., Dunlap, Kan. 
Jones, Burton H., Hay Springs, Neb. 



Jones, Robert G., Stewartville, Minn. 

Mair, William M., Garretson, So. Dak. 

Miller, Charles I., Sykeston, No. Dak. 

Oehler, William, St. Paul, Minn. 

Perkins, George G., Rogers, Ark. 

Peterson, Mathias, General Missionary work 
in Wis. 

Reese, John B., Lesterville and Lakeport, 
So. Dak. 

Rich, Ulysses G., Dickinson, No. Dak. 

Robbins, Anson H., Buffalo Gap, So. Dak. 

Rogers, S. J., Minneapolis, Minn. 

Shaw, William, General Missionary in Geor- 
gia. 

Williams, Samuel, Riverton, Neb. 

Wiltberger, Louis W., Henry, So. Dak. 



RECEIPTS FOR 



JANUARY, 1900 



$4590 


10 00 


7° 45 


2 00 


40 os 
8 60 


16 00 


15 00 



MAINE— $208. 

Bangor, Central Ch., by H. C. 

Sawyer 

Bar Harbor, by E. B. Means 

Bath, Central Ch., by J. C. Led- 

yard 

Blue Hill, Ladies' Mission Circle, 

by Mrs. C. J. Lord 

Portland, Williston Ch., by A. L. 
Burbank 

State St. Ch., by H. M. Bailey. 

High Street Ch., by E. A. Shaw 
Saco, First, by F. A. Lord 



NEW HAMPSHIRE— $388.20; of 
which legacies, $90. 

F. C. I. and H. M. Union of 
N. H., Miss A. A. McFar- 
land, Treas 200 00 

Bristol, S. S., birthday box in 
full, to const. Miss S. J. 
Danforth a L. M 1500 

Concord, South Ch. Silver 
Circle 5 00 



Amherst, Ladies' Char. Assoc, 
by Mrs. E. M. Hartshorn, spe- 
cial 

Atkinson, Y. P. S. C. E., by 
G. B. Freeman, for Alaska 

Bennington, Y. P. S. C. E., by 
Miss M. A. Rogers, for Alaska. 

Hampton, by M. A. Getchell.... 

Hanover, Est. of Andrew Moody, 
by J. K. Lord, Trus 

Lebanon, First, Mr. and Mrs. G. 
Amsden, by J. L. Spring 

Newmarket, T. H. Wiswall 

Newport, Jr. C. E., by Rev. J. 
Alexander 

Pembroke, T. A. Mills 

Tamworth, Est. of Faxon Gan- 
nett, by J. D. Hidden, Ex 

VERMONT— $2,401.20; of which 
legacies, $2,150. 

Vermont Domestic Miss. Soc, 
by W. C. Tyler 

Woman's H. M. Union, Vt., 
Mrs. R. Mackinnon, Treas. : 
For Salary Fund: 

Barton 

Burlington 



220 


00 


30 


00 


10 


00 


5 
6 


on 
20 


5° 


00 


6 
10 


00 
00 


6 

5 


00 
00 



8S 92 



5 00 
10 00 



$5 00 
6 60 


5 

25 


00 

00 


5 


00 



Jericho Centre 

Ludlow 

New Haven, Ladies' Union.. 

St. Johnsbury, North Ch 

St. Johnsbury, East, Y. P. S. 
C. E 



61 60 

Burlington, Est. of Mary S. Hill, 

by H. O. Wheeler, Ex 50000 

College St., by G. G. Benedict. 35 28 

Brattleboro, Center S. S. by 

C. H. Thompson 2500 

Y. P. S. C. E. of the Center 
Cong. Ch., by L. G. Park, for 

Alaska 5 00 

Lyndonville, C. E. Soc, by Mrs. 

G. G. Wheeler, for Alaska 5 00 

Ludlow, Y. P. S. C. E., by L. S. 

Bugbee, for Alaska 10 00 

Middlebury, Miss H. M. Board- 
man 1 7° 

Milton, Mrs. A. F. Plant 20 

North Troy, by H. H. Lewis.... 4 5° 

Pawlet, by Rev. L. T. Hughes.. 600 

St. Albans, L. M. Gilbert 1 00 

Springfield, Est. of Frederick 

Parks, by A. M. Allbe, At'ty.. 1,650 00 
Townshend, Rev. M. F. Hardy.. 1000 

MASSACHUSETTS-$6,332.2 7 ; of 
which legacy, $744.77. 

Mass. Home Miss. Soc, by Rev. 

E. B. Palmer, Treas 3.5°° °° 

By request of donors... 100 00 

For Salary Fund 500 00 

690 00 

Woman's H. M. A, Miss L. D. 
White, Treas., for Salary Fund. 200 00 

Amherst, First, by B. H. Wil- 
liams 182 59 

Ashburnham, First, by M. P. 

Greenwood 19 10 

Mrs. C. E. Fairbank 4° 

Belchertown, Y. P. S. C. E., by 
E. M. Fuller, for Alaska 7°° 

Boston, W. A. Wilde, for Salary 
Fund 25 00 

Brookfield, Mrs. R. B. Montague. 5 40 

Curtisville, by F. W. Heath 4 °° 

Dorchester, Second, by Miss E. 
Tolman 160 94 

Enfield, Est. of Mrs. M. P. Mc- 
Clary, by W. B. Kimball, Ex.. 744 77 



April, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



245 



Lee, A $200 

Lowell, Eliot, by J. Howard 3299 

Ludlow Center, First, by H. E. 

Miller 6 41 

Mill River, E. W. Rhoades 11 25 

Monson, E. F. Morris 125 00 

S. E. Bradford 10 00 

New Bedford, Y. P. S. C. E. of 

the North Ch., by A. G. 

Raunsevell, for Alaska 25 00 

Newburyport, Belleville Ch., by 

L. Patriquin 16 18 

Whitefield Ch., by H. B. Pack- 
ard 4 32 

Newton Centre, Extra-Cent-a-Day 

Band of the First, by S. F. 

Wilkins 13 00 

Norton, Trin. Cong. Ch., $7.34; 

Mrs. E. B. Wheaton, $100, by 

S. H. Cobb 107 34 

Palmer, L. H. Gager 100 00 

Pittsfield, A Friend 10 00 

Rehoboth, by F. A. Bliss 765 

Rutland, Y. P. S. C. E., by H. D. 

Bray 6 75 

Sheffield, by Dr. A. T. Wakefield. 8 00 

Southampton, " Sunshine Band," 

by Miss C. Edwards 15 00 

Springfield, Eastern Ave. C. E. 

Soc, by F. F. Champion 300 

Springfield, South, by W. H. 

Mullins 113 68 

Springfield, A Friend 5 00 

Sutton, E. L. Snow 2000 

Townsend, E. N. Haynes 70 

Webster, First, by E. L. Spald- 
ing 60 56 

Wellesley Hills, "S" 500 

Whitinsville, birthday offering of 

the S. S. Village Cong. Ch., by 

A. F. Whitin, for Alaska 28 18 

Williamsburg, First, by H. W. 

Hill 21 06 

Worcester, A Friend 25 00 

Worcester, Y. P. S. C. E. of the 

Union Cong. Ch., by O. S. 

Kendall, Jr 10 00 



RHODE ISLAND— 70 cents. 
Providence, Mrs. M. I. Tuttle 



70 



CONNECTICUT — $4,478.88; o f 
which legacies, $571.76. 

Miss. Soc. of Conn., by Rev. 

J. S. Ives 168 os 

For Western work 1,35000 

Woman's H. M. Union, Miss A. 
W. Moore, Treas. : 

Hartford, First, by Mrs. H. B. 
Langdon, special 10 00 

New Milford, by Miss B. Hine. 18 34 

North Haven, Ladies' Benev. 
Soc, by M. W. Eliot, for Sal- 
ary Fund 32 50 

Norwich, Taftville, Y. P. S. C. 
E., by S. C. Whittlesey 1 65 

Winsted, Second, by Mrs. C. 
W. Gay 23 00 

85 49 

Ansonia, by B. A. Cramer 4600 

Bridgeport, South Ch. Y. P. S. 

C. E., by Mrs. H. C. Bradley, 

for Alaska 10 00 

Mary Barnes Palmer Mission 

Circle of the First, by A. H. 

Hincke, for Salary Fund 25 00 



Bristol, First, by S. M. Wells, Jr. $83 67 

Bethel, First, by A. H. Knox 74 83 

Canaan, Pilgrim, by S. W. Adam. 6 50 

D. N. Fuller 2 00 

Chaplin, H. T. Crosby 70 

Chester, Primary S. S., by Mrs. 

M. S. Brooks 4 27 

Coventry, Y. P. S. C. E. of the 

Second, by W. C. Haven 2 56 

Cromwell, by S. M. Savage 117 01 

Darien, by A. Morehouse 5082 

Deep River, by L. Kellogg 1262 

Derby, Second, by J. Ewen 22 00 

East Morris, Mrs. J. W. Skilton.. 4 40 

Enfield, First, by F. A. King 43 00 

S. S. of the First, by H. E. 

Allen 40 00 

Fair Haven, Second 17 31 

Falls Village, Y. P. S. C. E., by 

C. W. Hanna 4 5° 

Farmington, A Friend 20000 

Goshen, Lebanon, by Rev. M. 

Burr, Add'l 23 50 

Greenfield Hill, Y. P. S. C. E., of 
which for Alaska, $5, by A. M. 

Wakeman 20 26 

Kensington, by S. M. Cowles 33 05 

Meriden, First, by H. M. Billard. 39 32 

A friend and member of First 

Ch 5 00 

Middletown, South Ch., by G. A. 

Craig 20 00 

Monroe, by A. _ Wheeler 920 

Nepaug, A Friend 4 00 

New Fairfield, Y. P. S. C. E., by 

G. M. Nevins, for Alaska..... 500 

New Haven, Yale University, 

Add'l by B. Perrin 105 00 

Mrs. C. E. Curtis 500 

C. M. Mead 2000 

M. J. C 4 00 

Newington, Y. P. S. C. E., by 
C. S. Francis, for Alaska...... 1000 

New London, First Ch. of Christ, 

by P. L. Harwood 4486 

Second, by F. N. Braman 29047 

New Preston, Add'l, by D. Burn- 
ham . . . i 1 00 

Northfield, by J. P. Catlin 21 04 

Norwalk, First, by E. L. Bryer.. 60 76 

Norwich, Second, by N. A. 

Gibbs 123 97 

Greenville Ch., by F. H. Pot- 
ter 10 00 

Norwich Town, First, by H. S. 

Hyde, for Alaska 10 00 

A Friend 20 

Old Lyme, First, by W. F. Coult 65 60 

Salisbury, by J. R. Harrison 25 87 

By E. S. Chapin u 39 

W. B. H. M., by Mrs. L. War- 
ner 12 75 

A Friend 3 °» 

South Britain, by M. C. Bradley. 23 77 

Southington, by R. G. Andrews, 

for Salary Fund 31 25 

Stonington, First, by R. G. An- 
drews 7 1 36 

Wallingford, First, by W. H. 

Newton 200 00 

Waterburv, Mrs. Camp, by W. H. 

Camp .". 100 00 

West Hartford, Est. of A. P. Tal- 

cott, by S. A. Griswold 71 76 

First Ch. of Christ, in full, to 
const. Mrs. S. P. Griswold 
and Miss H. H. Whitman 

L. Ms 22 66 

Westport, Saugatuck Ch., by 

H. C. Woodworth 3661 

Willimantic, legacy of Mrs. C. A. 
Humphrey, by C. Dean, Esq.. 500 00 



246 



The Home Missionary 



April, 1900 



Wilton, Y. P. S. C. E., by W. K. 

J. Hubbell, for Alaska 

Windsor, First, by S. H. Barber. 



NEW YORK— $706.03. 

Received by William Spalding. 
Treas. : 

Binghamton, Plymouth 

Black Creek 

Brookton, $7.14; King's Daugh- 
ters, $2.86 

Canandaigua 

Carthage 

Coney Island 

Dunton 

Hopkinton 

Morrisville 

Newburgh, S. S 

Norfolk 

Ogdensburg, Add'l 

Port Leyden 

Smyrna 

South Granville 

Wilmington 



$10 10 
56 50 



IS 


00 


4 43 


10 


00 


21 


04 


25 


00 


12 


00 


5 


00 


21 


04 


12 
2 


50 
67 


1 


57 


2 50 
15 83 
6 86 


1 


57 


2 


50 



Warsaw, Mrs. M. M. Barber, in 
part, to const. M. M. Bar- 
ber a L. M $10 00 

Watertown, Mrs. H. M. Green, 
for Alaska 1000 

West Brook, by T. S. Hoyt 400 

West Winfield, First, by G. A. 
Bonfoy 1700 



NEW JERSEY— $296.39. 

Chester, J. H. Cramer 

East Orange, First, by Miss F. 

W. Graves, for Alaska 

*'K" 

Jersey City, Waverly Ch., by 
W. P. Roberts 

Paterson, Jr. Y. P. S. C. E., Au- 
burn Street Ch., by Mrs. C. M. 
Giles, for Alaska 

Upper Montclair, Christian Union 
Ch., by M. S. Wilson 

Woodbridge, Y. P. S. C. E., by 
L. M. Dally, for Alaska 



10 00 
100 00 

9 39 

7 00 
135 00 
10 00 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. J. 

J. Pearsall, Treas.: 

Aquebogue 

Franklin, C. E., for Salary 

Fund 

Ithaca 



Angola, by Rev. J. H. Mallows.. 
Brooklyn, Puritan Ch., by H. A. 

W. Goll 

Tompkins Ave. Ch., by P. 

Palmer, special 

Bushwick Ave., by T. A. Cot- 
ton 

Willoughby Ave. S. S., Branch 
of Clinton Ave., by G. R. 

Beard 

Y. P. S. C. E. of Park Ch., by 

E. M. Lewis, for Alaska 

Churchville, by A. D. Stone 

Crown Point, Second, by J. A. 

Penfield 

Deposit, F. L. Perkins 

Evans, by Rev. J. H. Mallows.. 

Fairport, A. M. Loomis 

Munnsville, Miss M. C. Gaston.. 
Napoli, First, by N. A. Bliss.... 
New York City, Mt. Hope Ch., 

by Rev. H. M. Brown 

Pilgrim Ch., by S. Scott, Add'l. 

Y. P. S. C. E. of the Pilgrim 

Ch., by Miss N. A. Smith, for 

Alaska 

R. Turner, Jr 

Mrs. C. C. Tompkins 

Northfield, Union Miss. Soc, by 

W. S. Webb 

North Guilford, by C. E. Winsor 

Northville, by J. T. Downs 

Orient, by M. B. Brown 

Oxford, by J. W. Thorp 

Rensselaer City, First, by C. 

Snyder 

Richmond Hill, S. S. of the 

Union Ch., by G. Weston, Jr.. 

Sherburne, S. S., by C. H. Bick- 

ert 

Spencerport, S. S. of the First, by 

A. Mclntyre 

Walton, S. S. of the First, by 
P. H. Sinclair 



s 
28 


00 
25 


42 25 


13 


00 


25 


00 


s 


00 


7 37 



10 


00 


23 90 


20 


00 


5 


00 


5 


50 


10 


00 


1 


00 


4 27 


6 


00 


40 


00 


10 


00 


5 


00 


5° 


10 


11 


72 


1 


00 


16 


22 


M 


44 


15 


00 


6 


5° 


6 


00 


24 


00 


20 


13 


12 


12 



PENNSYLVANIA — $509.15; of 
which legacies, $24.97. 

Audenried, Welsh Ch., by W. 
Hughes 556 

Catasauqua, by Rev. W. C. 
Davies 1200 

Delta, Welsh Ch., by T. J. Wil- 
liams 5 00 

Germantown, First, by S. J. Ster- 
ritt 2 50 

Monterey, by Rev. B. B. James.. 10 00 

Pittsburg, Est. of Evan Davies, 
by S. A. Will 21 33 

Philadelphia, Est. of Philena 

Fobes, by Rev. G. R. Moore.. 3 64 

Central, by W. H. Lambert 416 39 

Park, by G. Harvey 1483 

Pittsburg, Puritan Ch., $4.05; 
S. S., $2.50; Ladies' Miss. Soc, 
$2, by Rev. G. Marsh 855 

Renovo, Swedish Ch., by Rev. 
G. O. Plant 3 50 

Spring Brook, Welsh Ch., by T. 
Elias 5 85 



MARYLAND— $57.95. 

Baltimore, First, by C. S. Hough- 
ton 42 95 

Fourth, by Rev. M. Wells 15 00 

VIRGINIA— 40 cents. 
Snowville, N. M. Richard 40 



NORTH CAROLINA-$ 3 . 

Hendersonville, Mrs. E. I. 
Brown, $1; Miss S. R. Ives, $2.. 



GEORGIA— $69.65. 

Amandaville, by Rev. M. G. 

Fleming 230 

Atlanta, Immanuel Ch., by Rev. 

G. A. Hill 1 75 

Central, by O. C. Fuller 2465 

Baxley, Friendship Ch., by Rev. 

G. N. Smith 50 



April, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



247 



Ladies' Miss. Soc. of Mt. 
Olivet Ch., Mrs. M. C. Smith, 
Fres., by Rev. W. F. Brewer. $3 70 

Braden, by Rev. C. C. King 1 50 

Braswell and Clara, by Rev. 
H. E. Newton 4 00 

Columbus, First, by Rev. G. VV. 
Cumbus 4 00 

Duluth, New Year's offering, by 
Rev. W. F. Brewer 600 

Five Forks, by Rev. T. J. Burden 25 

Fort Valley, First, by Rev. J. F. 
Blackburn 5 00 

Hoschton, by Rev. J. C. Forres- 
ter, Chestnut Mountain Ch., 
$2.35; and Oxford Ch., 6scts... 3 00 

Lovejoy, by Rev. J. H. Nash 1 00 

North Rome, by Rev. J. W. Gill- 
iam 200 

Oakwood, Liberty Ch., by Rev. 
A. J. Lyle ; 75 

Woodbury, $5; and Taylor, $2.23, 
by Rev. 6. Home 725 



ALABAMA— $35.30. 

Addison, Bethel Ch. and Hous- 
ton, Liberty Hill Ch., by Rev. 
W. J. Robertson 1 50 

Amos, by Rev. H. M. Gober 1 00 

Arbacoochee, Flowery Grove Ch., 
Cherry, Mountain Grove Ch., 
Chulafinne, Fairview Ch., and 
Lofty, Eadon Ch., by Rev. E. J. 
Loveless 2 10 

Art, Christian Hill Ch., and As- 
bury Union Hill Ch., by Rev. 

S. R. Branan 65 

Zada Ch. and Spio, Mt. Pisgah 
Ch., by Rev. D. T. Ard 70 

Ashland, Christian Home Ch., 
Millerville; Bethel Ch., Mead- 
ow; Shady Grove Ch., and Fre- 
donia, Mt. Pisgah Ch., by Rev. 
T. Wright 6 13 

Clanton, Kingston, and Mountain 
Springs, by Rev. C. A. Mil- 
stead 1 00 

Cottonwood, Oak Grove Ch., by 
Rev. E. Brackin 50 

Dothan, Newton's Chapel, and 
Wicksburg, St. John's Ch., by 
Rev. W. H. Newton 225 

Edwardsville, Salem Ch., and Ox- 
ford, Union Grove Ch., by Rev. 
G. W. Vaughan 1 00 

Gage, Oakville Ch., by Rev. 
J. N. Loudon 1 63 

Georgianna, Union Ch., by Rev. 
T. A. Pharr 1 30 

Hanceville, Grove Ch., Tidmore, 
Nectar, and High Rock Chs., 
and Tidmill, Concord Ch., by 
Rev. J. D. Foust 4 00 

New Site, Antioch Ch. and Jack- 
sons Gap, Liberty Ch., by 
Rev. E. B. Gunn 2 00 

Opelika, Mt. Jefftrson Ch.,$i.5o; 
and Perote, Corinth Ch., $1, by 
Rev. L. J. Biggers 250 

Rays Hill, Pine Grove Ch., by 
Rev. W. C. Culver 50 

Sulligent, New Prospect Ch., by 
Rev. G. W. C. Waite 50 

Tallassee, East Tallassee, Liberty 
Ch., Good Hope, Texas Union 
Ch., by Rev. J. M. Gipsey 3 50 

Watford, Bascom, Blackwood, 
and Dunedin, by Rev. M. V. 
Marshall 2 50 



LOUISIANA— $11.23. 

Iowa, by Rev. V. Lee $7 50 

Lake Charles, S. S., by Mrs. 

M. L. Barteau 3 00 

Walnut Lane and Longstraw, by 

Rev. J. Brue 75 



ARKANSAS— $1.62. 

Siloam Springs, Y. P. S. C. E., 
by Mrs. F. L. Schaub 1 62 



FLORIDA-$37. 4S . 

Avon Park, Union Evan. Ch., 

$6.75; Haines City, United Ch. 

of Christ, $3; and Rev. S. J. 

Townsend, $4.25, by Rev. S. J. 

Townsend 14 00 

Crestview, Holley, and Laurel 

Hill, by Rev. D. A. Simmons.. 70 

Milligan, Pyron Chapel, by Rev. 

I. A. Pharr 125 

Moss Bluff and Panasoffkee, by 

Rev. E. D. Luter 200 

Orange City, First, by S. M. 

Morse 1725 

Tavares, Union Ch., by Rev. L. 

J. Donaldson 225 

TEXAS— $49.83. 

Cleburne, Trinity Ch., by Rev. 
H. N. Smith 37 83 

Palestine, First, Rev. J. P. Camp- 
bell, by Rev. L. Rees 7 00 

Paris, First, by Rev. L. Rees 3 00 



OKLAHOMA— $78.43. 

Alpha, Parker, and Otter, by 

Rev. W. Kelsey 

Altona, Beulah Ch., by Rev. 

J. F. Robberts 

Hennessey, First, by Rev. G. N. 

Keniston 

Independence, by Rev. J. W. 

Naylor 

Medford, Pilgrim Ch., by Rev. 

C. \V. Tun-ell 

Pawnee, First, by Rev. J. W. 

Moats 

Ridgeway, by Rev. E. P. Owen.. 
Tryon, by Rev. W. L. Lumpkin. 
West Guthrie, by Rev. G. M. 

Rarey 

NEW MEXICO— $10. 

White Oaks, Plymouth Ch., by 
Rev. J. A. Hollars 

ARIZONA— $13.37. 

Jerome, Ch., $3; and S. S. Christ- 
mas collection, $8.37, for work 
in Cuba, by Rev. E. H. Ash- 
mun 



TENNESSEE— $12.30. 

East Lake and Central, by Rev. 
T. S. McCallie 1250 

OHIO-$7S2.49- 

Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser 
D.D.: 
Bellevue, by Edna Stahl 30 81 



17 


50 


5 


18 


5 


00 


2 


00 


22 


00 


15 


00 


1 


00 


7 


50 



248 



The Home Missionary 



April, 1900 



Cleveland, First, by G. A. Mon- 

asm ith $41 70 

Euclid Ave., by J. Snow 50 85 

Cyril Chapel S. S., by Rev. 

J. Musil 500 

" A-Cent-a-Week " 55 

Columbus, North, by L. H. 

Bulkley 5 25 

North, S. S., by B. -W. Peters 6 36 
Conneaut, Pa., by C. M. Pot- 
ter 10 25 

Elyria, E. W. Metcalf, special.. 87 50 
Second, Rev. H. S., Mrs 
Phyllis, Homer, Clara, 
Gladys, Walter, and Victor 

Wannamaker, $1 each 800 

Grafton, by E. Killip 475 

Lafayette, by T. E. Carlton 8 11 

Lima, by Rev. I. J. Swanson.. 5 00 

Lodi, by A. B. Taylor 18 24 

Lyme, by Melvin Wood 5 00 

Madison, by A. S. Stratton 11 87 

Special for Cuba 4 50 

Mansfield, F. E. Tracy 500 

Mantua, Three Friends ' 1 50 

Marblehead, by C. S. Chap- 
man 3 60 

Oberlin, First, by A. M. Love- 
land 42 93 

Second, by C. F. Beckvvith... 33 66 

Ravenna, by E. R. Wells 10 00 

S. S., by A. H. Riddle 10 00 

San Pedro Sula, C. A., Two 

Friends 10 00 

Saybrook, Mission Band, by 

Maude M. Wickham 3 35 

Sharon, Pa., S. S., by W. J. 

Thomas 224 

Steubenville, by H. J. Weber.. 20 63 
Tallmadge, C. E., by J. W. 

Seward 560 

Wakeman, C. E., by Miss M. 

Bacon 1000 



Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser, 
D.D., Treas. Bohemian Board, 
Cleveland, Ohio: 
Cleveland, First, by G. A. Mo- 

nasmith $s 00 

Euclid Ave., by J. Snow u 68 



16 68 



10 


00 


6 


25 


16 


25 


32 93 


S 


00 


2 


00 


IS 


00 


33 


75 


5 


00 



482 25 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. 
G. B. Brown, Treas. : 

Oberlin, Second S. S 

Painesville, First, Y. L. M. S.. 



Akron, West S. S., by Miss C. E. 
Bingham 

Ashtabula, Second, by R. Castle. 

Brecksville, by C. J. Dillan 

Claridon, Ch., $23.75; S. S., $10, 
by C. C. Kellogg 

Rock Creek, by Miss M. T. Bar- 
ker 



INDIANA— $301.51; of which leg- 
acy, $193.32. 

Received by Rev. E. D. Curtis: 

Fort Wayne, Plymouth Ch 

Indianapolis, Mayflower Ch 

Pilgrim Ch 

Terre Haute, First 



Cincinnati and Solsberry, by Rev. 
A. E. Pierce 14 29 

Monroeville, Est. of Elihu Bald- 
win 193 32 

Terre Haute, S. W. Noyes 70 



50 


00 


21 


00 


2 


20 


20 


00 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. G. 

B. Brown, Treas. : 

Akron, First 

Alexis 

Bellevue 

Berea 

Cleveland, First 

C. E., for Alaska 

Columbus, Eastwood 

Cuyahoga Falls 

Geneva 

Hudson 

Ironton, L. A 

Lafayette 

Lorain, C. E 

Mansfield, C. N. Conference, 

C. E. Union 

North Fairfield 

Oberlin, First, L. A. S 

Second, L. S. to const. Pres. 
J. H. Barrows, D.D., a 

L. M 

Pittsfield 

Rockport, L. A. S 

Sandusky, L. S. U 

Sheffield, Ben. Soc 

Steubenville, Woman's Guild.. 

Toledo, Central S. S 

Unionville 

Windham, C. E 



26 


00 


I 


00 


4 


00 


5 


00 


7 35 


10 


00 


10 


00 


2 


24 


5 


00 


5 


00 


2 


40 


1 


00 


1 


5° 


5 


16 


1 


So 


6 


63 



5 


00 


10 


00 


2 


SO 


2 
5 


40 
68 


1 


00 


5 


00 


176 56 



658 81 



ILLINOIS— $115.76; of which leg- 
acy, $75. 

Chicago, Mrs. A. O. Whitcomb, 

freight 66 

Geneseo, First, by J. Gray 36 10 

Griggsville. Est. of Ebenezer Bra- 

zin, by Thomas Turnbull, Ex.. 75 00 

Princeton, Friends in Cong. Ch.. 4 00 



MISSOURI— $106.64. 

Received by Rev. G. R. Merrill 

Austin 

Hopkins, Mizpah Ch 

Robbinsdale 



Amity, by Rev. B. F. Logan 

Bevier, Welsh Ch., by S. Evans. 
Kansas City, Beacon Hill, by J. 

E. Gaylord 

Kidder, by Rev. A. M. Beman.. 
Peirce City, First, by W. A. 

Rhea 

St. Joseph, Swedish Ch., by Rev. 

A. Swanstrom 

St. Louis, Reber Place Ch., by 
Rev. F. Stringer 

Union Ch., by W. Shetterly. . . . 
Webster Grove, First, by Dr. C. 

L. Armstrong '4 39 



29 


81 


I 


00 


3 


02 


34 


73 


4 


00 


6 


00 


9 


So 


12 


02 


12 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


4 


00 



April, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



249 



MICHIGAN— Legacy, $2,011.11. 

Eaton Rapids, Legacy of Allen C. 
Dutton, by F. Z. Hamilton.... 



WISCONSIN— $12.66. 

Fulton, by Mrs. D. F. Sayre, Jr.. 
Glemvood, Swedish Ch., by Rev. 

O. Ohlson 

Maple Valley, Scands, by Rev. 

A. J. Andrewson 

Wood Lake and Doctor's Lake, 

Swedish Chs., by Rev. F. G. 

Haggquist 



IOWA— $42.25; of which legacy, 
$39-5°- 

Des Moines, Est. of H. L. Rol- 
lins, by S. A. Merrill 

New Hampton, German Ch., by 
Rev. C. Zumstein 



MINNESOTA— $1,112; of which 
legacy, $200. 

Received by Rev. G. R. Merrill: 

Minneapolis, Lyndale 

Morris 

St. Paul, University Ave 

Worthington , 

Received by Rev. J. H. Morley: 

Ada 

Claremont 

Dodge Center 

Freeborn, S. S 

Grand Meadow 

Minneapolis, First 

Lyndale 

Oak Park 

Plymouth 

Northfield, to const. H. W. Mc- 

Chesney and W. V. Metcalf 

L. Ms 

New Richland 

Rochester 

St. Paul, Pacific 

Sleepy Eye 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. M. 

W. Skinner, Treas. : 

Austin 

Benson 

Claremont 

Y. P. S. C. E 

Detroit 

Dexter, Mrs. J. Sherman „ 

Duluth, Plymouth 

Pilgrim 

Morley 

Excelsior 

S. S 

Elk River ... '. . . . . . . . . .'..'..'.'.'.'.'. 

Glyndon 

Hawley 

Hudson 

Lake City 

Mrs. Collins 

Little Falls 

Mantorville 

Minneapolis, Lyndale 

First 

Plymouth 



5 66 

1 25 
4 i5 

1 60 



39 50 

2 75 



9 00 
14 23 

8 25 
42 85 



74 33 



9 93 
4 25 
4 50 
1 00 
6 00 

123 98 
15 50 
8 00 

231 3° 



100 03 

5 25 

6 00 
13 23 
12 84 



541 81 



11 32 
1 00 
3 00 
1 00 
8 00 

1 00 

2 00 
8 00 
5 00 

11 00 

2 00 
14 65 

3 00 
2 00 
2 00 
2 00 

2 50 
10 00 

3 00 

5 00 

6 00 
10 90 



New Ulm $7 50 

Jr. C. E. S 1 00 

New Paynesville 3 15 

Orrock, S. S 95 

Pelican Rapids ' 25 00 

Randall, Y. P. S. C. E 230 

Rochester, Y. P. S. C. E 3 13 

St. Paul, Plymouth 15 68 

Park 22 45 

Bethany 2 00 

Stillwater 1 35 

Spring Valley, Y. P. S. C. E... 5 °° 

Winona, First S. S 5 00 

208 58 

Less expenses 10 00 

198 58 

Dawson, by Rev. A. H. Tebbets. 3 50 
Detroit City, by Rev. E. L. 

Brooks 2 00 

Duluth, Mrs. C. B. King, by Rev. 

J. H. B. Smith 5 71 

Edgerton, by Rev. P. H. Fisk.... 5 16 

Freedom, by Rev. W. Fisk 5 00 

Granada, by Mrs. S. Cooper 1 00 

Hawley, Union, by Rev. S. E. 

Fish 8 35 

Medford, Legacy of Edmund 

Gale, by T. B. Clement, Ex.... 200 00 
Minneapolis, Bethany Ch., by 

Rev. S. G. Updyke 2 50 

Dr. E. J. Brown 1000 

Randall, by Rev. E. N. Ruddock. 3 06 

Red Wing, D. C. Hill 1000 

Springfield, by Rev. A. S. Heath- 
cote 7 50 

Winona, First, by Rev. G. R. 

Merrill 33 50 



KANSAS-$373-35- 

Received by Rev. L. P. Broad: 
Alma, by J. E. Kirkpatrick.. . . 

Almena 

Altoona 

Downs 

McDonald, R. T. Matthews.... 

Ocheltree 

Stockton 



Received by Rev. A. C. Hogbin, 
Treas. : 

Alma 

Capioma 

Ellis, A Friend 

Garfield 

Goodland, S. S 

Hiawatha 

Kirwin 

Maize 

Neosho Falls 

Severy 



Emporia, First, by J. D. Graham. 

Second, by H. J. Whitby 

Kinsley, First, by Rev. F. P. 

Strong 

Leavenworth, First, by Mrs. J. 

W. Johnson 

Parsons, Mrs. S. C. Boardman. 
Scatter Creek, $3.25; and Village 

Creek, $1.90, by Rev. J. A. 

Richards 

Valencia and Plymouth Rock, by 

Rev. C. E. Roberts 



6 00 
10 00 
2 00 
25 00 
5 00 
1 20 
8 75 



57 95 



28 00 
4 00 
4 00 

10 00 

1 00 
40 00 

7 35 
12 60 

8 00 

2 00 



116 95 

76 30 
10 00 

16 00 



5 15 
10 00 



2 5 



The Home Missionary 



April, 1900 



Valley Falls, First, by R. K. Mc- 
Cartney $37 00 

Wichita, Fairmount Ch., by Rev. 
W. A. Bosworth 380 



NEBRASKA— $581.83. 

Received by H. A. Snow, Treas. : 

Albion 2039 

S. S 3 10 

Sr. Y. P. S. C. E 10 55 

Jr. Y. P. S. C. E 8 70 

Aurora 20 75 

S. S 3 80 

Beemer 550 

Danbury 825 

Sr. Y. P. S. C. E 1 65 

Doniphan 10 00 

S. S 3 60 

Farnam 20 00 

Fremont 43 62 

S. S 10 00 

Friend 24 85 

S. S 5 65 

Geneva 10 00 

Havelock 200 

Irvington 800 

Lincoln, Plymouth 2349 

S. S 9 5i 

Vine St. S. S 9 36 

Loomis 673 

Palisade, Eureka Ch 352 

Rokeby 151° 

Seward 6 00 

Silver Creek, Y. P. S. C. E.... 24 15 

Spring View 2 55 

Unadilla, Paisley Ch n 00 

Wahoo 25 95 

Wallace 3 00 

West Point 7 °° 

S. S 2 00 



Arcadia, by Rev. W. H. Houston 
Butte, First, by Rev. J. Gray.... 

Zion German Ch., by Rev. J. 

Single 

Doniphan, West Hamilton, and 

South Platte, by Rev. C. H. 

Huestis 

Friend, German Ch., by Rev. 

G. L. Brakemeyer 

Guide Rock, German Ch., by 

Rev. M. E. Eversz 

Hay Springs, by Rev. B. H. 

Jones 

Hemingford, by Rev. G. J. Bat- 

tey 

Hyannis, by Rev. H. C. Cleve- 
land 

Inland, by D. Stimbert 

Liberty, $9.78; and Beaver Creek, 

$1.14, German Chs., by Rev. 

M. E. Eversz 

McCook, Ch., $15; J. Brewing, 

$10, by Rev. G. Essig 

Minersville, by Rev. G. B. Spang- 

ler 

Norfolk, Second, by Mrs. J. L. 

Beach 

Petersburg, by Rev. J. Roberts.. 
Plymouth, First, by H. N. Strain. 
Steelburg, Steele City Ch., by 

Rev. H. H. Avery 

Strang, Shickley, and Bruning, 

by Rev. W. A. Alcorn 

Sutton, German Ch., by Rev. G. 

Grob 



369 77 



7 00 
5 So 



_-8 


40 


4 


00 


1 


6S 


20 


00 


2 


33 


5 
3 


65 
00 


10 


9^ 


25 


CO 


3° 


75 


S 
7 
7 


42 
50 
70 


10 


00 


28 76 


3 45 



NORTH DAKOTA-$59. 3 i. 

Received by Rev. G. J. Powell: 

Amenia 

Carrington 

Dexter 

Sanborn 



Cando, Jr. C. E., by Mrs. A. H. 
Lean 

Glen Ullin, German Chs., Beth- 
any, Bethesda, Ebenezer, and 
St. Marks, by Rev. J. C. 
Schwabenland 

Harwood, by Rev. J. R. McCon- 
nehey 

Hesper, by Rev. S. Slater 

Jamestown, by Rev. C. H. Phil- 
lips 



SOUTH DAKOTA— $354.10. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. 
F. M. Wilcox, Treas.: 

Academy, Y. P. S. C. E 

Badger Lake 

Clark 

Deadwood 

Huron 

Lead 

Y. P. S. C. E 

Mitchell 

Moreau River, Ch. I. W. M. S.. 

Redfield 

Spearfish 

Wakonda 

Webster 

Yankton 



$22 00 


6 00 


1 00 


7 92 



Armour, Ch. of Christ, by Rev. 

F. M. Cutler 

By H. B. Mead 

Bowdle, by Rev. J. Davies 

Carthage, by Rev. H. M. Pinker- 
ton 

Henry, by Rev. L. W. Wiltber- 
ger 

Huron, by Rev. W. H. Thrall.. 

Lake Henry, by Rev. W. H. 
Thrall 

Lake Preston, by Rev. J. J. 
Jones 

Lebanon and Springs, by Rev. 
C. H. Dreisbach 

Meckling, Rev. G. W. Crater 

Mission Hill, by Rev. D. B. 
Nichols 

Myron, $8; and Cresbard, $2, by 
Rev. R. Jones 

Pierre, First, by Rev. W. A. Ly- 
man 

Sioux Falls, German Ch., $17; 
Woman's Miss. Union, $11, by 
Rev. M. E. Eversz 

Spearfish, First, by Rev. J. A. 
Becker 

Webster, by Rev. W. B. Hub- 
bard 



Less $5, error in statement of col- 
lection by Rev. T. Thirloway.. 



36 92 



12 50 



4 00 
2 50 



25 
12 63 
4 00 

2 00 
8 00 

3 80 
1 00 

4 90 
1 00 
7 45 

1 50 

2 20 
2 80 
1 70 



53 23 



4 


67 


12 


00 


10 


00 


9 


70 


3 


65 


170 


00 


2 


75 


2 


50 


1 


00 


2 


50 


2 


00 


10 


00 


15 


70 


28 


00 


10 


00 


21 


40 



5 00 



April, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



251 



COLORADO— $274.23. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. 
K. A. Thomas, Treas $56 43 

Colorado Springs, First, by J. B. 
Severy '. 133 zy 

Cortez, by Rev. F. G. Boylan 5 22 

Crested Butte, Union Ch., by 
Rev. J. L. Read 29 00 

Denver, Rev. T. A. Uzzell 1000 

Globeville, $9; and Overland, 
$11, German Chs., by Rev. W. 
H. Dorn 20 00 

Hayden, by Rev. J. H. Single- 
ton 7 60 

Silverton, S. S., by Rev. G. 
Eaves 3 7° 

Steamboat Springs, by Rev. N. 
R. Curtis S 00 

Whitewater, by Rev. G. Lind- 
say .' 4°i 



WYOMING— $4. 

Rock Springs and Green River, 
by Rev. V. H. Ruring 



MONTANA— $85.25. 

Billings, by H. W. Rowley 32 15 

Livingston, Holbrook Ch., by 

Mrs. H. J. Miller 35 10 

Missoula, First, by Rev. O. C. 

Clark 18 00 



IDAHO— $19. 

Woman's Missionary Union, Mrs. 
L. H. Johnston, Treas. : 

Mountain Home Aux 

First, by Rev. C. E. Mason.. 

Wardner, by Rev. T. W. Wal- 
ters 



5 00 
11 00 



CALIFORNIA— $240.44. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Southern 
California, Mrs. M. M. Smith, 
Treas. : 

La Mesa 

Los Angeles, Bethlehem Ch. 

Ontario 

Santa Ana 

For Salary Fund: 

Avalon, S. S 

Claremont, S. S 

Highland, Y. P. S. C. E 

Norwalk, S. S 

Pasadena, S. S 

Y. P. S. C. E 

Riverside, S. S 

Santa Ana, Y. P. S. C. E. . . . 
San Jacinto, S. S 

Alturas, by Rev. H. Perks 

Cottonwood, by Rev. T. Hanna.. 
Fields Landing and Elk River, 

by Rev. E. E. Chakurian 

Nordhoff 

Oakland, Second, by Rev. J. W. 

Phillips 15 35 



2 


54 


10 


00 


16 


00 


4 


00 


1 


67 


3 9i 


10 


00 


1 


25 


7 


00 


5 


00 


16 


50 


10 


00 


1 


22 


89 


09 


6 


00 


10 


00 


12 


00 


10 


00 



Pacific Grove, Mrs. H. S. Gold- 
smith 

Rocklin, by Rev. W. C. Day.... 

San Diego, Rev. H. Kingman, by 

Rev. J. L. Maile 

Second, and La Mesa, First, 
by Rev. T. R. Earl 

San Rafael, First, by Rev. W. H. 
Atkinson 

Santa Barbara, Y. P. S. C. E., 
by Mrs. H. G. Parish, for 
Alaska 

Santa Rosa, First, by Rev. L. D. 
Rathbone 

Tehama, A Friend 

Woodland, by Rev. E. D. Haven. 



OREGON- 



'S- 



$1 00 
2 00 



7 SO 

6 00 



7 SO 

30 00 
14 00 



II 


25 


5 


00 


16 


25 


6 


00 


3 


00 



3 00 
2 62 



Received by I. A. Macrum, Treas. 
H. M. Soc: 

Oregon City, First, by Mrs. M. 
E. Stevens 

Portland, First, by C. H. Gay- 
lord 

Received by Rev. C. F. Clapp: 

Beaver Creek, Welsh 

lone 

Astoria, First, by Rev. E. Cur- 
ran : 

Condon, First, by Mrs. C. Hurl- 
burt 

Gaston, by C. A. Raymond 

Greenville, Ch., $2; Hillside, $2, 
by Rev. D. Staver 

St. Helens, Plymouth Ch., by 
Rev. C. E. Philbrook 

Stafford, German Ch., by Rev. 
M. E. Eversz 



WASHINGTON— $86.99. 

Alderton, McMillin, and Orting, 

by Rev. O. L. Fowler IS 1( . 

Cheney, Jr. C. E. of the First, 

by W. L. Fulton go 

Christopher, White River Ch., by 

Rev. H. W. Mote . 1000 

Endicott, by Rev. T. W. Walters. 1 25 

Eureka, by Rev. A. R. Olds 1000 

Marysville, First, by Rev. R. 

Bushell 5 oo 

Mt. Pleasant, $2.54; andMt. Dur- 

gan, $3, by Rev. G. Baker 5 54 

New Whatcom, Miss. Soc, by 

C. S. Teel 6 60 

Seattle, Edgewater Ch., by Rev. 

J. T. Nichols 22 60 

Snohomish, First, by Rev. B. S. 

Winchester 10 05 

Unknown — 
Anonymous 8 34 

January Receipts: Contributions. $16,229 57 

Legacies 6,10043 

Interest 2,074 50 

Annuity 552 13 

Home 

Missionary. . 76 70 

Literature 3 61 

$25,036 94 



252 



The Home Missionary 



April, 1900 



APPOINTMENTS FOR 

FEBRUARY, 1900 



Not in commission last yea}- 

Arrington, A. E., Guerneville and Pocket 

Canon, No. Cal. 
Campbell, Charles E., Burwell, Neb. 
Heglim, Samuel S., Athol, No. Dak. 
Jenkins, W. M., Big Lake, Minn. 
Lowes, George A., Spring Creek and West 

Spring Creek, Pa. 
Neale, Robert, Huntington, Ore. 
Parsons, A. S., Sierraville and Beckwith, No. 

Cal. 
Raven, Alfred N., Seattle, Wash. 
Simmons, William B., White Cloud, Kan. 
Whitman, Frank E., Columbia City, Wash. 
Wilson, James, Hot Sulphur Springs, Colo. 

Re -co in m ission ed 

Barney, Lewis W., Jersey City, N. J. 
Brooks, Edward L., Detroit City, Minn. 



Bruce, David G., Big Horn, Wyo. 
Burdette, Miss Ella, Plymouth, Genesee, and 

Penn Valley, Mo. 
Cobleigh, Elvira, Walla Walla, Wash. 
Crater, George W., Meckling, So. Dak. 
Davis, David L., Williamstown, Pa. 
Flook, Jacob, Omaha, Neb. 
Green, George E., Canova, So. Dak. 
Griffith, William, Pingree, No. Dak. 
Hale, Edson D., Decoto, No. Cal. 
Heald, Josiah H., Nogales, Ariz. 
Killen, John T., Hope, No. Dak. 
Lincoln, George E., Trenton, Neb. 
Matthews, James T., Plymouth, Pa. 
Mitchell, Frank, Faulkton, So. Dak. 
Pease, William P., Atwood and McDonald, 

Kan. 
Searles, George R., Hancock, Minn. 
Smythe, Charles M., Verndale, Minn. 
Stevens, John L., Iberia, Mo. 
Thirloway, Timothy, Belle Fourche, So. Dak. 



RECEIPTS FOR 



FEBRUARY, 1900 



MAINE— $319.45. 

Auburn, High Street Ch., by J. 
F. Atwood 

Bangor, First, by W. P. Hub- 
bard 

Brunswick, D. F. Atwater 

Hallowell, by A. F. Page 

Portland, West Ch., by B. C. 

Fuller 

" From a Friend " 

Scarboro, by J. T. Small 

NEW HAMPSHIRE— $1,14910; of 
which legacy, $450. 

Boscawen, Cent-a-Day Fund, by 

Dea. E. Raymond 

Exeter, by J. T. Rea 

E. S. Hall 

Francestown, by A. Downes 

Hanover, S. S. of Cong. Ch., 
Dartmouth College, by J. V. 
Hazen, for Cuban work 

Y. P. S. C. E. of Dartmouth 
College, by M. K. Smith, for 
Alaska 

Mrs. S. J. Kellogg 

Keene, S. S. of the Second, by 

A. C. Gillis 

Lyme, S. S., by W. S. Balch.... 

By D. A. Grant 

Mason, Estate of Mrs. L. A. 

Barnes, by L. D. Stevens 

North Hampton, Mrs. A. Gove, 

to const. Mrs. R. M. Lovejoy 

a L. M., by F. R. Drake.... 
Rochester, First, by F. P. Went- 

worth 

VERMONT— $50.94. 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. R. 
Mackinnon, Treas. : 
For Salary Fund: 
Brattleboro, Y. P. S. C. E.... 

Rutland 

St. Johnsbury, South Ch 

North Ch 



30 


00 


I 


00 


15 


00 


17 


00 


00 


00 


10 


00 



Burlington, S. S. of College St. 
Ch., by G. G. Benedict, for 

$46 45 Milton' S.' S. ,' by G. ' N.' Wood ! '. '. 
Waterbury, A Friend 



MASSACHUSETTS— $3,357.39; of 
which legacy, $2,000. 

Mass. Home Miss. Soc. by Rev. 

E. B. Palmer, Treas 

By request of donors 



8 47 Boston, W. A. Wilde, for Salary 
3 00 Fund 

510 00 w. G. Means 

10 43 Dedham, Y. P. S. C. E. of the 

First, by Miss M. C. Burgess.. 

Groton, Y. P. S. C. E., by H. W. 

9 3° Raddin, for Alaska 

Haverhill, Est. of J. H. Carleton, 
by H. S. Howe and D. Porter, 

15 00 Trustee 

3 75 Holyoke, Golden Rule Guild of 

the Grace Cong. Ch., $5; Y. P. 

8 00 S. C. E., $6.50, by Rev. F. P. 

630 Reinhold 

47 00 Mattapoisett, by Miss S. W. Hill- 

er 

45000 Mittineague, E. H. Shepard 

Newton Centre, Extra-Cent-a-Day 
Band of the First, by S. F. 

50 00 Wilkins 

Northampton, Y. P. S. C. E. of 
27 85 the Edwards Ch., by Miss F. 

M. Winchell 

Jr. C. E. of the First, by K. E. 

Phelps, for Alaska 

North Attleboro, S. J. Gilman.. 

Palmer, Mrs. W. H. Hitchcock.. 

5 00 Southampton, S. S., by W. A. 

10 00 Parsons 

5 00 South Framingham, Y. P. S. C. 

5 00 E. of Grace Ch., by S. E. Clapp, 

for Alaska 

25 00 Springfield, E. J. Wilkinson 



$S 50 
2 44 
15 00 



1,000 

82 


00 

00 


1,082 


30 


25 00 

8758 


10 


00 


10 


00 


2,000 


30 



14 00 

II 50 



10 00 
2 00 



14 6l 



5 00 
9 10 



April, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



253 



CONNECTICUT — $1,909.74; o f 

which legacies, $390.82. 
Miss. Soc. of Conn., W. W. 

Jacobs, Treas $248 03 

Woman's H. M. Union, Miss A. 
W. Moore, Treas. : 
Bridgeport, West End, by Mrs. 

J. J. Rose, for Salary Fund.. 4 00 

Hartford, First, by Mrs. H. B. 

Langdon, special 10 00 

South Ch., Second Aux., by 

Miss G. M. Hills, special.. 8 19 
First, Jr. Aux., by Mrs. C. T. 
Millard, by Mrs. M. W. Ja- 
cobus, special 10 00 

South Canaan, Aux. for Salary 

Fund 5 00 

Trumbull, by Mrs. L. B. 
Beach, for Salary Fund 8 00 

45 19 
Black Rock, First, by Mrs. H. F. 

Bunce, for Alaska 1000 

Bridgeport, Park Street, by A. 

S. Hall 15000 

Canaan, A Friend 100 

Mrs. H. Eddy 5 00 

East Hampton, Y. P. S. C. E., 

by J. G. Bevin, for Alaska 1000 

East Morris, " F. L. In Memo- 

riam " 10 00 

Farmington, A Friend 500 00 

Greenfield Hill, Jr. C. E. Soc, 

by Miss S. E. Hopkins, for 

Alaska 10 00 

Hartford, Glenwood Ch., by R. 

W. Williamson 443 

Madison, Y. P. S. C. E., by Miss 

A. Nash 5 00 

Mansfield Center, Y. P. S. C. E<, 

by N. E. Barrows, for Alaska.. 500 

Meriden, " N. F., First Ch." 500 

Middlefield, M. E. Lyman 60 00 

Milford, Plymouth, by R. R. 

Hepburn 26 13 

New Haven, Howard Ave., by 

C. C. Chalker 27 80 

A Friend 50 00 

New Milford, Y. P. S. C. E. of 

the First, by G. Turrill, for 

Alaska 10 00 

Norfolk, Ch. of Christ, by Rev. 

W. F. Stearns, special 5000 

Norwich Town, Legacy of Rev. 

Nathaniel Beach, by O. S. 

Smith, Adm 319 7 2 

Pomfret, First, by Miss A. 

Mathewson 166 98 

Salisbury, Miss Norton's class 25 

A. N. Beach 150 

Talcottville, Est. of Mrs. H. H. 

Talcott, by J. G. Talcott, 

Adm., Add'l 12 00 

Terry ville, Y. P. S. C. E., by 

M. M. Hunter, for Alaska 10 00 

Thomaston, Y. P. S. C. E. of the 

First, by E. M. Parke, for 

Alaska 10 00 

Unionville, Woman's Miss. Soc, 

by Mrs. F. A. Chamberlin 13 50 

Wapping, Y. P. S. C. E., by R. 

P. Dewey, for Alaska 10 00 

Waterbury, Second, by Miss C. 

L. Dodge, for Alaska.... 2000 

West Hartford, Est. of Maria 

Whitman, by H. E. Taintor 59 10 

Westminster, by A. C. Greene.. 5 41 

Whitneyville, Y. P. S. C. E., by 

Miss M. S. Dickerman, for 

Alaska 5 00 

Wilton, by T. F. Gilbert 23 70 



Windsor, C. E. Soc, by H. W. 

Strickland, for Alaska $1000 

Woodstock, First, by Miss R. L. 

Williamson, for Alaska 1000 

NEW YORK-$2,6 4 6.67. 

Received by William Spalding, 

Treas. : 

Ashville, C. E 5 00 

Bridgewater 10 00 

Brooklyn, Central, " A Friend," 

special 500 00 

Buffalo, First, C. E 1000 

Cambridge C. E 4 00 

Columbus 30 00 

Coventryville 8 25 

Eaton 5 00 

Fairview, Welsh 14 36 

Lincklaen 3 00 

Lockport, First, S. S 10 00 

Moravia, Ch., $47.50; S. S., $2.50. 50 00 

North Java 2 85 

Olean 2 71 

Otisco 9 73 

Portland 6 70 

Riverhead 12 35 

Seneca Falls 19 00 

A Friend 20 00 

Siloam, Welsh 19 " 

Sloan 2 00 

Summer Hill, by H. E. Ran- 

ney 100 00 

Syracuse, Danforth 50 00 

Rev. E. Curtis, supplies 15 00 

Ticonderoga 10 00 

West Groton 20 00 

Willsborough 18 80 





957 86 


/bman's H. M. Union, Mrs. 


- 


J. J. Pearsall, Treas. : 




For Salary Fund: 






5 00 


Brooklyn, Ch. of the Pil- 








Buffalo, Niagara Square, Peo- 




ple's Ch., Y. P. S. C. E 


14 30 




10 81 




2 00 


Middletown, First, Ladies' 




Guild, to const. Miss H. 




Veltman and Mrs. A. More- 






112 92 


New York City, Broadway 






74 00 




10 00 




26 50 



Brooklyn, Ch. of the Pilgrims, 
by J. E. Leech 

Y. P. S. C. E. of Park Ch., for 
Alaska 

F. Condit, for Alaska 

Camroden, Y. P. S. C. E., by 

Miss C. Thomas 

Clifton Springs, Two Friends 

Gaines, by H. R. Anderson 

Maine, A. B. Dayton, to const. 

Mrs. F. Atwater a L. M 

Massena, J. S. Russell 

Middletown, First, by C. L. 

Boyd 

Mt. Vernon, First, by J. M. 

Hurd 

New Lebanon, Miss E. C. Ken- 
dall 

New Village, First, by J. B. 

Gould 



355 53 



609 17 



10 00 


10 00 


12 00 


10 00 


6 50 


|00 00 


2 00 


19 92 


7 70 


3 25 


10 00 



254 



The Home Missionary 



April, 1900 



New York City, Broadway Tab- 
ernacle S. S., by E. A. Dow- 



ney 



S. S. of the North, by Rev. W. 
H. Kephart 

Little Morris's birthday gifts. 
In Memoriam 

C. I. Fisher, M.D 

Philadelphia, by Rev. F. A. Has- 

sold, for work in the West 

Rochester, Plymouth Ch., by 

G. P. Decker 

Warsaw, by Miss M. Barber.... 
Yonkers, Mrs. E. W. Morris 



NEW JERSEY— $534.40; or which 
legacy, $500. 

Bloomfleld, Legacy of Mrs. R. P. 

Coe, by Dr. E. B. Coe and H. 

M. Barrett, Exs 

Closter, First, by I. H. Dema- 

rest 

Iloboken, Norwegian Ch., by 

Kev. J. H. Pederson 

Jersey City, C. L. Ames 

Little Ferry, German Evan. Ch. 

by Rev. F. W. Martini 



PENNSYLVANIA-$3o. 3 i. 

Received by Rev. H. A. Schauf- 

fler, Slavic Braddock Mission. 
Chandler's Valley, Free Evan. 

Scand. Ch., by Rev. C. J. Lund- 

quist 

Du Bois, Swedish Ch., by Rev. 

C. J. Wideberg 

Edwardsville, Welsh, by D. H. 

Morgan 

Titusville, Swedish Ch., by Rev. 

C. F. Olsson 

Warren, Swedish Bethlehem Ch., 

by Rev. F. Nilson 



MARYLAND— $27.47. 

Baltimore, First, by C. S. Hough- 
ton 

Canton, by Rev. T. M. Beaden- 
koff 

Frostburg, by Rev. G. W. Moore. 

GEORGIA— $66.25. 

Received by Rev. W. F. Brewer, 
Woman's Home Miss. Soc, 
Mrs. Lula V. Wood, Treas. : 
Meansville, by Rev. S. C. Mc- 

Daniel 

Conyers Ch 



Atlanta, Ladies' Union of Central 
Ch., by Mrs. H. B. Wey, to 
const. Mrs. F. E. Jenkins a 
L. M 



LOUISIANA-$i 9 .5o. 

Woman's Miss. Union, Miss 
M. L. Rogers, Treas.: 
New Orleans Ladies' Miss. 
Soc, Straight University, spe- 
cial 

iennings, Mrs. W. Humphreys., 
.ake Charles, by Rev. V. Lee... 



$-'5 


00 


35 


00 


3 

10 


00 
00 


17 


00 


8 

24 

10 


35 
39 

00 



500 


00 


11 


00 


4 40 


10 


00 



12 21 

I 25 
I 25 

7 SO 
5 00 
3 10 



7 5° 
9 00 



15 00 
1 25 



16 25 



5 00 
10 00 
4 50 



FLORIDA— $19.46. 

Cocoanut Grove, Union Ch., by 
Rev. J. Bolton 

Eden, Union Ch., by Rev. L. J. 
Sawyer 

Orange City, Ch., Add'l 



OKLAHOMA— $56.20. 

Choctaw City, by Mrs. A. H. 
Tannehill 

Guthrie, Plymouth Ch., by Rev. 
W. J. Marsh 

Perry, Lawnview Ch., by Rev. 
B. F. Sewell 

Pond Creek, Union Ch., by Rev. 
H. W. Conry 

Wellston, by Rev. H. L. Saun- 
ders 



ARIZONA— $2. 

Tempe, Second Ch., by Rev. J. 
Soza 



TENNESSEE— $14.86. 

Knoxville, Pilgrim Ch., by J. R. 
Williams 



OHIO-$ 4 o 5 .73- 

Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser, 
D.D: 

Ashtabula, Swedish, by Rev. 

C. A. Widing 

" A-Cent-a-Week " 

Belpre, H. H. Glazier 

Cincinnati, Storrs, Rev. R. W. 

Harris 

Walnut Hills, by E. J. Wood. 

Cleveland, Pilgrim, by H. C. 

Holt 

Park, by Rev. T. D. Phillips. 

Columbus, Eastwood, by A. S. 
Hentig 

Granville, by Rev. D. Jones, 
D.D 

Huntington, West Va., by C. 
O. Mickle 

Marysville, by Rev. W. S. Bug- 
by 

Nebo, by Rev. J. F. Davies 

Nelson, by Mrs. L. A. M. Bos- 
worth 

Oberlin, First, by A. M. Love- 
land 

Pierpont, by Rev. R. F. Boyd.. 

Ridgeville Corners, by C. C. 
Walcott 

West Millgrove, by C. R. Ray- 
mond 

Youngstown, Elm St., by Rev. 
J. B. Davies 

Zanesville, First 

Second 



Received by Rev. J. G. Fraser, 
of which $51.56 for Bohemian 
work: 

Woman's H. M. Union, Oi.io, 
Mrs. G. B. Brown, Treas: 

Akron, West 

Cleveland, Euclid Avenue 



$4 46 

5 00 
10 00 



2 00 
35 00 
2 50 
5 00 
11 70 



14 80 



2 
I 


50 
52 
00 


2 
31 


50 
35 


113 

6 


56 
00 


SO 


00 


6 


00 


18 


75 


10 
6 


26 
05 


10 


00 


4 
5 


00 
00 


3 


50 


4 


00 


12 


00 


10 

2 


25 

50 



4 00 
40 00 



April, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



255 



Fredericksburg $5 00 

Geneva 5° 

Gomer, L. A. S 1 44 

Medina 5 00 

Mt. Vernon 5 00 

North Ridgeville, L. B. S.... 400 

Wellington 3 5° 

West Williamsfield 10 00 



78 44 
10 00 



2 

s 


00 
00 


10 
1 
3 


41 
00 


7 


76 


29 


34 


5 25 
5 00 

12 00 
8 00 

15 00 


45 


25 




85 


10 


00 



Oberlin, Mrs. L. G. B. Hills.... 

Toledo, Central, by W. E. Mc- 

Kecknie 

INDIANA— $85.44. 

Received by Rev. E. D. Curtis: 

Bremen 

Fremont 

Ridgeville, Ch., $9.50; S. S., 91 

cents 

South Vigo 

Terre Haute, Second Ch ... 

West Terre Haute, Bethany 
Ch 



Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. A. 

D. Davis, Treas. : 
Indianapolis, Fellowship 

Plymouth S. S 

Mayflower, for Salary Fund.. 

Orland 

Terre Haute, First 

Indianapolis, Covenant Ch., by 
Rev. J. R. Mason 

Terre Haute, Second, by Rev. 
J. M. Sutherland..... 



ILLINOIS— $134-50. 

Illinois Home Miss. Soc, by Rev. 
J. Tompkins, $34.50, of which 
$17.50 special 34 5° 

Payson, J. K. Scarborough 100 00 



MISSOURI-$4oi.8o. 

Iberia, Y. P. S. C. E., by L. 

Sullens, for Alaska 2 65 

Lebanon, First, by Mrs. N. Ivey. 17 60 

Neosho, by E. Skewes 30 83 

St. Joseph, Y. P. S. C. E. of the 

Tabernacle Ch., by J. C. Chase. 8 19 
St. Louis, Immanuel Ch. of Lin- 
denwood, by Rev. M. J. Nor- 
ton 500 

Pilgrim Ch., by G. L. Day 144 00 

First, by F. T. Knox 17853 

Springfield, German Woman's 
Board, $3; and Two Friends, 

$9, by Rev. P. Burkhardt 12 00 

Pilgrim Ch., by Rev. O. A. 
Palmer 3 00 



IOWA— $5. 

Minden, Prof. McDonald, by 
Rev. F. Brenneke 



MINNESOTA— $393.26. 

Received by Rev. G. R. Merrill: 

Barnesville 8 00 

Granada 1 25 



152 33 


1 40 
4 25 


2 


00 


7850 


21 
43 
13 

5 


50 
78 
70 
00 


14 
5 


00 
00 


5 
15 


00 

00 


12 


00 


4 


10 


5 7° 


10 


00 



Minneapolis, Plymouth Ch $5676 

Owatonna 12 70 

Rochester 48 62 

St. Paul, Bohemian Cyril 

Chapel 20 00 

Stillwater 5 00 



Athens and Spencer Brook, 

Swedish Chs., by Rev. A. P. 

Engstrom 

Brainerd, by E. Robinson 

Cass Lake and Farris, by Rev. 

A. Clark 

Duluth, Pilgrim Ch., by H. I. 

Pineo 

A Friend in Pilgrim Ch., by 

Rev. A. Milne 

Faribault, by J. W. Moir 

Fertile, by Rev. B. Iorns 

Freeborn, by Rev. W. Fisk 

Garvin and Custer, by Rev. E. A. 

Wood 

Hancock, by Rev. G. R. Searles. 
Lake City, Swedish Ch., by Rev. 

E. A. Anderson 

Moorhead, First, by J. Costain.. 
Pelican Rapids, Scand., by Rev. 

J. F. Okerstein 

St. Paul, Bethany, by J. W. 

James 

People's German Ch., by Rev. 

W. Oehler 

Silver Lake, Bohemian Free Re- 
formed Ch., by J. S. Jerabek. . 

KANSAS— $230.62. 

Received by Rev. A. C. Hogbin, 

Treas. : 
- Hiawatha 

Kansas City, First 

Lawrence, Pilgrim Ch 

Sabetha 

Seneca 

Stockton, Ladies' Soc 

Wheaton, Clear Creek 

Garfield, by II. P. Wolcott 

Herndon, German, $10; and Lo- 
gan, German, $4, by Rev. W. 

F. Vogt 

Kansas City, Pilgrim Ch., by 

Rev. D. B. Griffiths 

Longton, by Rev. T. E. Watt.. 
Seabrook, Ch., $17; W. H. M. 

Union, $8; and Pauline, $4.42, 

by Rev. P. B. Lee 

Stafford and Plevna, by Rev. 

M. W. Woods 

Valencia and Plymouth Rock, 

by Rev. C. E. Roberts 

Wakefield, by W. Eustace 

Wichita, Mrs. S. C. D. Putnam.. 

NEBRASKA— $598.55. 

Received by H. A. Snow, Treas. : 

Addison 

Ashland 

Aurora 

Beatrice 

David City 

Franklin 

Fremont 

Mrs. I. E. Heaton, gift of pro- 
ceeds of sale of lot 

C. E. Pollard 



20 


00 


3i 


50 


9 70 


12 


25 


5 


00 


10 


00 


12 


00 


100 


45 


5 


00 



5 00 
7 00 



29 42 

3 50 

15 00 
26 25 
25 00 



4 50 


10 


90 


10 


00 


44 45 
20 16 


30 

21 


00 
96 


280 


13 


15 


00 



256 



The Home Missionary 



April, 1900 



Omaha, St. Mary's Avenue 

Upland, S. S 

Wallace, Christmas offering, 
$1.34; Mite Soc, $1.95 

Less expenses 



Neb. Home Miss. Soc, by Rev. 
A. E. Ricker: 

Chadron, $15.26; S. S., $5.12; 

Y. P. S. C. E, $ 2 .io 

Ainsworth, First, by Rev. H. M. 

Triplett 

Aten, by Rev. W. T. Williams.. 
Cowles, $3.75; Ladies' Aid, $15, 

by Rev. S. Deakin 

Curtis, by Rev. C. W. Preston, 

Add'l 

Dover, Mrs. B. W. Lee 

Emmons and Hoffnung, Ger- 
man Chs., by Rev. H. Hess 

Grand Island, First, by Rev. E. 

V. Gardner 

McCook, A Friend, by Rev. G. 

Essig 

Stanton, by Rev. J. J. Klopp 

Wymore, by Rev. T. C. Moffatt. 



NORTH DAKOTA— $40.13. 

Antelope and Dwight, by Rev. 

O. P. Champlin 

Cando, by Rev. J. J. Davy 

Dickinson, by Rev. U. G. Rich.. 
Fessenden, German Ch., by Rev. 

P. Lich 

Michigan City, First, by Rev. D. 

S. Strawman 

Sykeston and Cathay, by Rev. 

J. L. Martin 



SOUTH DAKOTA— $91.69. 

Aberdeen, by Rev. J. I. Sanford. 
Arlington, Mrs. A. E. Hubbard. 
Belle Fourche, Woman's Miss. 

Soc, by Rev. T. Thirloway. . . . 
Beresford, Ch., $4.50; and Pioneer 

W. M. S., $8, by Rev. H. W. 

Jamison 

Canova, $3.25; and Dover, $10, by 

Rev. G. E. Green 

Faulkton, by Rev. F. Mitchell.. 
Fort Pierre, Y. P. S. C. E., by 

C. L. Millett 

Hetland and Badger, by Rev. A. 

D. Shockley 

Howard, by Rev. T. H. Hill.... 
Letcher, by Rev. C. F. De Groff. 
Mitchell, by Rev. D. R. Tomlin. 
Tyndall, German, by Rev. J. Satt- 

ler 

First, by Rev. J. H. Olmstead. 

COLORADO— $94.37. 

Received by Rev. H. Sanderson, 
Colorado Springs, by Mrs. M. 
C. Gile 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. F. 
N. Thomas, Treas. : 

Cripple Creek 

Denver, Villa Park 



$50 00 
384 

3 29 



494 23 
21 81 



$i 00 

8 72 
24 00 



22 48 

22 so 

S 00 



1 00 
40 

5 00 

12 00 

25 00 

2 00 
12 00 



3 16 

5 00 
10 00 

12 50 

4 76 
4 71 



6 14 



13 


25 


2 


50 


3 


00 


8 


40 


4 


00 


5 


00 


5 


00 


4 


70 


6 


00 



Elyria, Pilgrim Ch., by Rev. 

C. B. Wells 

Harman, Union Ch., by Rev. 

H. M. Skeels 

Longmont, First, by E. White.. 

IDAHO— $10. 

Challis, Y. P. S. C. E., by 
L. H. Johnston, for Alaska 10 00 



WYOMING— $7.75. 

Dayton, First, by Rev. B. H. 

Woodford 

Sheridan, by Rev. E. D. Bost- 

wick 

Wheatland, Union Ch., by Rev. 

D. L. Thomas 



1 00 

2 50 
4 25 



10 


00 


21 


00 


10 


00 


I 


50 


5 


00 



565 

5 00 



10 65 



MONTANA— $41. 

Great Falls, First, by Rev. W. 

N. Moore 

Helena, First, by Rev. F. G. 

Blanshard 

Ladies' Miss. Soc, by Mrs. YV. 
S. Bell 



UTAH— $6.50. 

Robinson, by Rev. F. Foster 

Salt Lake City, Plymouth Ch., by 
Rev. F. E. Bigelow 



CALIFORNIA-$493.3 4 . 

Received by Rev. J. L. Maile, 

Treas. W. H. M. Union: 47 50 
Los Angeles, Rev. G. A. Raw- 
son 500 

52 50 
Received by Rev. J. K. Harri- 
son: 

Benicia 4000 

Lockeford 12 15 

Lodi 24 00 

Loomis, Y. P. S. C. E 5 00 

Oakland, Market St. Ch 3 00 

Rev. F. B. Perkins 25 00 

Rev. G. Mooar, D.D 1500 

124 IS 
Woman's Home Miss. Union: 

Glen Ellen 250 

Pacific Grove 1 1 55 

Picard 1 00 

Porterville 50 

Miss Lamson 100 

San Francisco, Bethany 500 

First 36 65 

Plymouth 10 00 

68 20 
Woman's H. M. Union, South- 
ern California, Mrs. K. 

Barnes, Treas 41 39 

Los Angeles, Plymouth 2500 

Pasadena, Lake Avenue 1000 

San Diego, S. S. of the First, 

for Salary Fund 13 10 

89 49 
Bakersfield, First, by Rev. E. R. 

Fuller 24 00 



April, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



257 



Buena Park, by Rev. D. W. 

Morgan 

Daggett, by Rev. J. L. Maile 

Etiwanda, by Rev. A. VV. Thomp- 
son 

Los Angeles, Bethlehem Ch., by 
Rev. D. W. Bartlett 

Bethlehem Institutional Ch., by 

Rev. D. W. Bartlett 

Norwalk, Bethany Ch., by Rev. 

G. H. DeKay 

Pacific Grove, Mayflower Ch., 

Rev. O. W. Lucas 

Pasadena, by Rev. H. G. Smead. 
Porterville, First, by Rev. J-. A. 

Milligan 

San Bernardino, First, by C. P. 

Stone 

Sherman, First, by Rev. E. Cash. 
Stockton, Rev. J. C. Holbrook, 

D.D 

OREGON— $94.60. 

Received by Rev. C. F. Clapp. 
Forest Grove 

Woman's H. M. Union, Mrs. 
C. F. Clapp, Treas.: 

To const. Rev. C. F. Clapp a 

L. M 

Ashland, First, by Rev. G. W. 

Nelson 

Hubbard, $5; Elliott Prairie, $s; 

and Smyrna, $15, by Rev. J. M. 

Dick 

Ranier and Scappoose, by Rev. 

R. M. Jones 



$6 75 
3 4° 


3i 


75 


1 


00 


2 


50 


14 


10 


6 

17 


00 
00 


25 


00 


5 
2 


00 
50 



9 60 



50 00 
8 00 



25 00 
2 00 



WASHINGTON— $189.77. 

Dayton, First, by Rev. M. B. 

Morris $20 00 

Edison, by Rev. E. D. Farns- 

worth 2 50 

Endicott, German Ch., by Rev. 

J. M. Preiss 3 50 

Everett, First, by Rev. R. B. 

Hassell 1000 

Hillyard, First, by Rev. F. C. 

Kranse 15 00 

Medical Lake, First, by Rev. J. 

D. Jones 8 65 

Natchez, by Rev. L. V. Slasor.. 9 55 

Pullman, First, by Rev. H. C. 

Mason 1000 

Roy, First, W. M., $3; Ch., $2, by 

Rev. L. W. Brintnall 5 °° 

Seattle, Plymouth Ch., by Rev. 

A. J. Bailey 72 9° 

University Ch., by Rev. T. C. 

Wiswell 10 42 

Spokane, Swedish Ch., by Rev. 

J. J. Huleen 625 

Springdale and Chewelah, by Rev. 

E. Owens : 5 00 

Tekoa, by Rev. G. E. Atkinson.. n 00 

Feb. Receipts: Contributions $10,18691 

Legacies 3.340 82 

Interest 1,006 00 

Annuity 8,000 00 

Home Missionary. 20 55 

Literature 85 



$22,555 13 



DONATIONS OF CLOTHING, ETC. 

Received and reported at the rooms of the Woman's Home Missionary Association, from 
September, i8gg, to January 20, rgoo. Mrs. Louise A. Kellogg, Treasurer 



Allston, H. M. D., by Mrs. Sophia 

K. Parkhurst, box $119 63 

Amesbury, Main St. Ch., W. H. M. 

S., by Mrs. Thos. Clark, barrel.. 7890 

Amherst, First Ch., L. B. S., by 

Mrs. D. W. Marsh, box 202 38 

Andover, Abbot Academy, by Miss 

Maria S. Merrill, barrel 5000 

Chapel, B. S., by Miss S. E. Jack- 
son, two barrels 200 00 

South Ch.. L. S., by Miss J. B. 

Goldsmith, barrel 83 07 

Arlington, Aux., by Mrs. Jessie R. 

Crosby, barrel 113 14 

Ashby, W. U., by Mrs. F. W. 

Wright, box 29 42 

Auburn, L. C, by Mrs. E. K. Ban- 
croft, barrel 75 00 

Auburndale, L. B. S., by Mrs. C. 

C. Burr, box and three barrels. . 255 98 
Baldwinville, L. S., by Miss M. B. 

Raymond, barrel 80 00 

Beverly, Dane St. Ch., Aux., by 

Mrs. Mary F. Messer, barrel 10285 

Boston, Central Ch., Aux., by Mrs. 

Benj. Tenney, box and barrel.. 358 30 
Mt. Vernon Ch., L. S. C, by 
Mrs. M. Webb Reed, two bar- 
rels 211 76 

Old South Ch., S. C' by Mrs. C. 
J. Clapp, box and four barrels. 741 95 



Bradford, L. M. S., by Mrs. W. K. 

Farrar, barrel $48 95 

Bridgewater, L. S. S., by Mrs. 

Abby M. Bassett, barrel 6600 

Brockton, Porter Ch., by Mrs. A. 

L. Peirce, two barrels 136 81 

Brookfield, L. B. S., by Miss M. E. 

Gibson, barrel 30 00 

Buckland, L. S., by Mrs. Ida L. 

Robinson, barrel 65 00 

Cambridge, First Ch., S. G., by 

Mrs. R. B. Hall, barrel 1400 

Campello, L. S., by Mrs. S. W. 

Park, two barrels 136 52 

Central Falls, R. I., L. S., by Mrs. 

Anna H. Lyon, two barrels 85 00 

Chelmsford, C. E. M. C, by Miss 

Lillian W. Kilbourne, barrel.... 6500 
Chicopee, Aux., by Mrs. A. F. Gay- 
lord, barrel 80 00 

Chicopee Falls, Second Ch., by 

Mrs. H. G. Pillsbury, barrel.... 5575 
Cohasset, L. B. S., by Mrs. Char- 
lotte M. Bates, barrel 7500 

Dalton, L. S. S., by Miss Clara L. 

Crane, two barrels 151 00 

Danvers, First Ch., L. B. S., by 

Miss May P. Grover, barrel 54 70 

Dorchester, Pilgrim Ch., Aux., by 

Mrs. B. F. McKechnie, barrel.. in 32 



258 



The Home Missionary 



April, 1900 



Second Ch., W. H. M. A., by 
Mrs. Lillie W. Alagwood, two 

barrels $125 50 

Village Ch., L. H. M. S., by 
Mrs. F. M. Swan, two barrels.. 130 98 
East Douglas, by Mrs. L. J. 

Bowles, box 1500 

East Providence Centre, R. I., 
S. S., by Mrs. George H. Curtis, 

box 1225 

Essex, L. B. C, by Mrs. M. C. Os- 
good, barrel 52 00 

Falmouth, L. S., by Mrs. Dora G. 

McLane, barrel 86 27 

Fitchburg, Rollstone Ch., L. B. S., 

by Mrs. E. C. Babbitt, barrel 63 50 

Framingham, L. S., by Mrs. Mary 

Le B. Stockwell, box 340 23 

Globe Village, Union Ch., L. B. S., 

by Miss Jessie Curtis, barrel -j-j 85 

Gloucester, L. S., by Mrs. Martha 

A. Brooks, barrel 12757 

Granby, L. S., by Mrs. S. B. Dick- 
inson, box and barrel 7265 

Great Barrington, L. S., by Mrs. 

M. D. Sexton, two barrels 84 00 

Groton, L. B. S., by Miss Ethel N. 

Shumway, $20, and barrel 86 14 

Hatfield, L. B. S., by Mrs. Stan- 
ley Graves, box 123 39 

Hinsdale, L. B. S., by Mrs. Kate 

C. Plunkett, barrel 8261 

Holliston, Aux., by Mrs. G. H. 

Phillips, $40; barrel, and package. 75 00 

Jamaica Plain, Central Ch., Aux., 

by Mrs. R. \V. Wood, barrel 100 31 

Lawrence, Lawrence St. Ch., Aux., 
by Miss Emma F. Aldred, bar- 
rel 78 00 

Trinity Ch., Aux., by Miss Clara 

F. Prescott, barrel 72 50 

Lee, L. B. S., by Miss Isabel M. 

Ames, two barrels 133 00 

Leicester, L. C. S., by Mrs. Louisa 

A. Knight, box and barrel 126 00 

Lexington, by Cyrus Hamlin, 

D.D., box 1000 

Lincoln, L. H. M. S. C, by Miss 

Alice M. Peirce, barrel 9560 

Longmeadow, L. S. C, by Mrs. 

Kate S. Gates, barrel 10500 

Lowell, Eliot Ch., H. M. A., by 
Mrs. Pauline E. Bigelow, two 

barrels 185 00 

High St. Ch., Aux., by Mrs. 

Emma M. Hemingway, barrel.. 77 69 

Pawtucket Ch., Aux., by Mrs. VV. 

D. Leland, barrel 61 00 

S. S. Class, by Miss E. C. Co- 
burn, barrel 3 r 85 

Maiden, First Ch., L. B. S., by 

Mrs. Mary C. Eastman, barrel. 82 50 

Maplewood Ch., Aux., by Mrs. 

A. D. Crombie, barrel 51 90 

Mrs. W. M. Barbour, barrel 41 72 

Mattapoisett, H. M. S., by Mrs. 

Mary F. Briggs, two barrels 7894 

Maynard, Aux., by Mrs. Amory 

Maynard, barrel 64 00 

Medford, Mrs. Goddard, box 1000 

Merrimac, Aux., by Miss Sallie G. 

Sargent, barrel 68 43 

Montague, L. B. S., by Miss Lucy 

A. Nims, barrel 61 75 

Orange, Aux., by Mrs. George W. 

Fry, barrels 84 30 

New Bedford, North Ch., L. B. S., 
by Mrs. Caroline W. Hathaway, 

box 130 00 

Newbury, First Ch., Aux., by Miss 
Addie M. B. Little, barrel 61 00 



Newburyport, Belleville Ch., Aux., 

by Miss A. E. VViggin, box.. $195 00 
Prospect St. Ch., Aux., by Miss 

A. S. Edwards, barrel 12967 

Whitefield Ch., T. M. C, by Mrs. 

F. G. Alger, $5, and barrel 6830 

Newport, R. L, United Ch., Aux., 
by Miss Eliza R. Hammett, two 

boxes 224 67 

Newton, Eliot Ch., W. A., by Mrs. 

Nellie B. Snow 762 35 

Newton Highlands, Aux., by Mrs. 

E. W. Hyde, three barrels 12500 

Newtonville, C. S., by Mrs. M. H. 

Binney, barrel 57 88 

North Amherst, Aux., by Mrs. 

George P. Spear, package 2700 

Northampton, Edwards Ch., Aux., 
by Mrs. A. F. Kneeland, $16 and 

two barrels 166 00 

North Brookfield, First Ch., W. A., 
by Mrs. A. G. Stone, two bar- 
rels 9215 

Tucker Mem. Ch., L. B. S., by 

Miss Nellie L. Smith, barrel.. 4000 

Northfield, L. S., by Miss Mary T. 

Dutton, barrel 43 65 

Orange, Aux., by Mrs. George W. 

Fry, barrels 84 30 

Providence, R. I., Academy Ave. 
Ch., Aux., by Mrs. Josephine 

Kellogg, barrel 3097 

Beneficent Ch., Y. P. S. C. E., 

by Miss E. W. Olney, box 15421 

Central Ch., Aux., by Mrs. Har- 
riet E. Stockwell, three boxes. 487 40 
Pilgrim Ch., S. C, by Miss 

Emma E. Cooke, barrels 13000 

Union Ch., Aux., by Mrs. Sarah 

C. Knight, box 22524 

Roxbury, Walnut Ave. Ch., Aux., 
by Mrs. D. M. Babcock, two bar- 
rels 135 00 

Salem, Crombie St. Ch., L. S., 
by Mrs. H. B. Williams, two 

barrels 118 00 

South Ch., L. B. S., by Miss 
Susan S. Driver, $25, and three 

barrels 275 55 

Sharon, L. B. S., by Mrs. Emma 

P. Colburn, barrel 86 95 

Reading, Aux., by Mrs. Solon Ban- 
croft, two barrels 75 00 

Somerville, Prospect Hill Ch., 
Aux., by Mrs. Frank N. Lewis, 

box 103 84 

South Acton, L. S. C, by Mrs. M. . 

Katharine Richardson, barrel 52 33 

South Braintree, Aux., by Mrs. J. 

Alonzo Dyer, barrel 25 00 

Spencer, L. C. S., by Mrs. Clara 

M. Howland, barrel 67 05 

Springfield, First Ch., Aux., by 
Mrs. Henrietta L. Graves, bar- 
rel no 60 

Hope Ch., L. S., by Mrs. Edwin 

L. Bolles, box 150 00 

Memorial Ch., Aux., by Mrs. 

Mary F. Peirce, three barrels.. 263 42 

South Ch., W. H. M. A. S., by 
Mrs. Mary H. Mitchell, two 

barrels i g 5 88 

Sterling, L. B. S., by Mrs. M. C. 

Keyes, barrel 33 7* 

Sunderland, W. H. M. S., by Mrs. 

E. P. Butler, barrel 5° °° 

Sutton, Aux., by Mrs. J. C. Hall, 

$5, and barrel 5° 00 

Taunton, Broadway Ch., H. M. S., 
by Mrs. Mary P. Swinerton, 
box 137 76 



April, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



2 59 



Winslow Ch., L. S., by Mrs. 

Hiram S. Davis, barrel $10500 

Walpole, L. A., by Mrs. Jessie W. 

Bentley, £2.50, box, and barrel.. 137 5* 

Watcrtown, P. S. C, by Mrs. M. 

Fuller, two barrels 18S 00 

Westboro, Aux., by Mrs. F. E. 

Corey, barrel 61 95 

West Boxford, C. S., by Miss Anna 

P. Park, barrel 27 75 

West Brookfield, D. S., by Mrs. 

Alice J. Carter, barrel 35 75 

Westerly, R. I., Aux., by Mrs. 

Addie T. Spicer, barrel 100 00 

Westfield, First Ch., L. B. S., by 

Mrs. F. P. Searle, box 16222 

Second Ch., L. B. S., by Mrs. 

K. B. Towle, barrel 98 68 

Westhampton, Aux., by Mrs. F. C. 

Montague, $15, and barrel 6736 

Westminster, Aux., by Mrs. V. U. 

Burpee, barrel 19 68 



Whitinsville, L. B. S., by Miss Lila 

S._ Whitin, box $163 33 

Whitman, Aux., by Mrs. Sarah P. 

Smith, two barrels 89 44 

Winchendon, Aux., by Mrs. C. C. 

Parker, box 130 00 

Woburn, L. C. R. S., by Mrs. 

Elizabeth Shaw, barrel 4620 

Wollaston, Aux., by Mrs. Mary R. 

Farwell, box 25 00 

Worcester, Old South Ch., Aux., 

by Mrs. L. G. Tirrell, barrel.. 181 00 

Piedmont Ch., W. A., by Miss 
Edgenie B. Higgins, barrel 131 00 

Plymouth Ch., by Mrs. Sarah L. 
Drury, box 138 38 

Union Ch., by Mrs. Henrietta A. 

Wardwell, two barrels 10669 

West Newton, Aux., by Mrs. W. 

A. Young, three barrels 28732 



$14,488 99 



Received in December, i8gg 



151 41 


73 32 


1 IS 93 


34 60 


152 88 


100 00 



Akron, Ohio, West Ch., by Mrs. 

J. L. Davies, barrel $53 50 

Binghamton, N. Y., Helpers' Soc. 

of First Ch., by Mrs. Ella C. 

Goff, box 

Branford, Conn., Ladies of First 

Ch., by Mrs. T. S. Devitt, barrel. 
Bridgeport, Conn., Ladies' Union 

of Park St. Ch., by Mrs. C. K. 

Bishop, box and barrel 

Brooklyn, N. Y., L. B. S. of Cen- 
tral Ch., by Mrs. J. Simmons, 
barrel 

Zenana Band of Central Ch., by 
Sadie E. Tiebout, two boxes 
and barrel 

Henry Ward Beecher Miss'y 
Circle of Plymouth Ch., by 
Miss Sara L. Pearsall, box 

L. B. S. of Tompkins Ave. Ch., 
by Mrs. Sarah M. Higgins, two 

barrels and package 22046 

Burlington, Vt., Ladies' Soc. of 

College St. Ch., by Mrs. M. H. 

Buckham, barrel 84 75 

Chardon, Ohio, L. M. S., by Mrs. 

Abbie L. Foote, barrel 5000 

Chatham, N. J., Ladies' Soc. of 

Stanley Ch., by Mrs. W. H. 

Lum, barrel 82 35 

Chester, N. H., L. H. M. S., by 

Miss Mary B. Noyes, barrel 5300 

Cleveland, Ohio, Ladies' Asso. of 

Euclid Ave. Ch., by Mrs. W. L. 

Foster, barrel 93 37 

Colchester, Conn., L. B. S., by 

Fannie S. Curtis, box and freight. 6 00 

Dubuque, Iowa, W. M. S. of First 

Ch., by Miss May Bissell, two 

barrels and box 16625 

Durham, N. H., W. M. S., by 

Mrs. C. H. Waterhouse, barrel.. 3500 

Enosburg Center, Vt., L. B. S. of 

Memorial Ch., by Mrs. H. R. 

Maynard, barrel 43 00 

Exeter, N. H., Benev. Soc, by 

Mrs. A. T. Dudley, barrel 100 00 

Falls Church, Va., First Ch., by 

Gertrude Nourse, barrel 7668 

Franklin, N. H., Village Ch. 

Cent Union, by E. J. Gilchrist, 

barrel 44 00 

Glastonbury, Conn., L. A. S., by 



Mrs. G. D. Bartlett, box and 

barrel $1 10 00 

Glenbrook, Conn., Missionary Soc. 
of Union Ch., by Mrs. Chas. 

White, barrel 70 00 

Greene, N. Y., by Mrs. J. W. 

Keeler, barrel 30 21 

Groton, Conn., Ladies, by Miss 
Elizabeth M. Avery, box, barrel, 

and cash 120 00 

Guilford, Conn., W. H. M. S. of 
First Ch., by Frederic E. Snow, 

two barrels 118 43 

Hampton, N. H., Ladies, by Mrs. 

S. Albert Shaw, barrel 4646 

Hartford, Conn., Friends from 
Glenwood Ch., by Mary L. War- 
ren, box 17 39 

Sew. Soc. of South Ch., by Mrs. 
Geo. H. Little, two barrels, 

package, and cash 22259 

Wetherford Ave. Ch., by L. M. 

Burt, barrel 46 00 

L. A. S. of Windsor Ave. Ch., by 
Mrs. T. J. McReynolds, barrel. 82 45 

Ivoryton, Conn., L. H. M. S., by 

Mrs. E. A. Northrop, barrel 70 00 

Lower Cabot, Vt., Ladies, by James 

P. Stone, barrel, and cash 61 00 

Middletown, Conn., L. H. M. S. 
of First Ch., by Mrs. A. R. 

Crittenden, barrel 120 00 

South Ch., by Nellie A. Douglas, 

box 136 00 

Milford, N. H., Ladies' Charitable 
Soc, by Mrs. J. B. Melendy, 

barrel and freight 19854 

Montclair, N. J., W. H. M. S. of 
First Ch., by Mrs. W. M. Brown, 

two barrels 153 00 

Moravia, N. Y., H. M. S., by Mrs. 

T. T. Tuthill, box 1000 

Mystic, Conn., H. M. Circle, by 

E. A. Lengworthy, two barrels.. 79 00 

New Haven, Conn., L. H. M. S. of 
First Ch., by Mary E. Bennett, 

five boxes 782 72 

L. A. S. of Humphrey St. Ch., 
by Mrs. F. S. Burnett, two 

barrels and box 113 54 

L. A. S. of Ch. of The Redeemer, 
by Mrs. Harriet S. Miller, bar- 
rel 80 00 



260 



The Home Missionary 



April, 1900 



New Milford, Conn., Ladies' Sew. 
Soc, and H. M. U\, by Mrs. 
F. A. Johnson, barrel and cash.. $85 00 

New York City, L. A. S. and 
Young Ladies' Guild, of Trinity 
Ch., by Miss E. V. Peck, barrel. 96 00 

Norwalk, Conn., L. B. S. of First 
Ch., by Miss E. W. Brown, box 
and barrel 215 00 

Norwich, Conn., W. H. M. Sew. 
Soc. of Broadway Ch., by Mrs. 
Edward D. Fuller, three boxes. 503 25 

Norwich, N. Y., King's Daugh- 
ters, by Mrs. W. D. VVerkheiser, 
barrel 50 00 

Norwich Town, Conn., W. H. M. 
S. of First Ch., by Mrs. H. L. 
Yerrington, three barrels 20000 

Nutley, N. J., L. A. S. and Op- 
portunity Circle of King's Daugh- 
ters of St. Paul's Ch., by Edna 
A. Mount, two barrels 100 00 

Old Saybrook, Conn., L. H. M. S., 
by Agnes A. Acton, box 61 00 

Omaha, N. Y., First Ch., by Mrs. 
A. B. Somers, box 5000 

Plantsville, Conn., by L. J. Smith, 
box 76 50 

Portland, Maine, Ladies' Benev. 
Circle of Williston Ch., by Jen- 
nie L. Shurtleff, two barrels and 
cash 120 00 

Ravenna, Ohio, VV. M. S., by Miss 
Sarah C. Hart, two barrels 77 93 

Redding, Conn., \V. H. M. S., by 
Mrs. Edgar S. Field, barrel 3247 

Ridgway, Pa., W. M. S. of First 
Ch., by Mrs. Annette D. A. 
Hamblen, box and barrel 128 14 

Rutland, Vt., H. M. S., by Mrs. 
Geo. H. Fox, box 95 70 

St. Joseph, Mo., Tabernacle Ch., by 
Mrs. Stephen E. Coombs, box 
and package 108 50 

St. Louis, Mo., L. A. S. of First 
Ch., by Mrs. W. H. Little, bar- 
rel 66 28 

H. M. S. of Pilgrim Ch., by Mrs. 
Samuel Owens, three barrels 
and package 294 60 



Sanbornton, N. H., Ladies, by 
Mrs. J. N. Perrin, barrel $28 10 

South Windsor, Conn., L. H. M. S. 
of First Ch., by Mrs. Oliver S. 
Jones, barrel 76 00 

Springfield, Vt., Ladies, by Mrs. 
James Hartness, box 54 20 

Stafford Springs, Conn., L. II. M. 
S., by Mrs. Ellen J. McLaugh- 
lin, box 150 00 

Steuben, Ohio, C. E. Soc, by 
Annabell Roe, barrel 27 00 

Stratford, Conn., H. M. Sew. Soc, 
by Mrs. R. W. Bunnell, barrel.. 127 00 

Torrington, Conn., L. B. S., by Ida 
E. F. Burr, barrel 253 29 

Wallingford, Conn., L. B. S., by 
Miss Jennie E. Doolittle, barrel.. 87 31 

Ware, Mass., Miss Sage's S. S. 
Class, by Miss M. A. Barlow, 
barrel 65 00 

VVaterbury, Conn., L. B. S. of 
First Ch., by Flora S. Russell, 
box 15400 

Watertown, Conn., L. B. S., by 
Mrs. Henry T. Dayton, box and 
cash 7y 00 

Washington, D. C, W. H. M. S 
of Mt. Pleasant Ch., by Mrs. 
A. S. Sturtevant, barrel, pack- 
age, and cash 142 41 

Webster Groves, Mo., Woman's 
Assoc, of First Ch., by Mrs. L. 
D. Wright, two barrels and pack- 
age 115 00 

West Hartford, Conn., Sew. Dept. 
of First Ch., by Mrs. W. H. Hall, 
barrel and cash 71 45 

West Manchester, N. H., Ladies' 
Aux. to A. B. F. Missions of 
So. Main St. Ch., by Mrs. Mary 
C. Eastman, barrel 41 24 

Wilton, Conn., Ladies' by Mrs. Ed- 
ward Olmstead, barrel and cash.. 69 11 

Zanesville, Ohio, First Ch., by Mrs. 

W. M. Morgan, barrel 4000 



.336 31 



Rectivfd in fanuary, igoo 



Bridgeport, Conn., King's Highway 
Ch., by Susan E. Hobby, bar- 
rel $11800 

West End Ch., W. M. S., by Mrs. 
C. W. Morehouse, two boxes 

and cash 120 00 

Bristol, Conn., H. M. Aux. of First 
Ch., by Mrs. Anne E. North, 

two barrels 134 53 

Brooklyn, N. Y., L. B. S. of Cen- 
tral Ch., by Mrs. J. Simmons, 

box and barrel 74 99 

L. B. S. of Clinton Ave. Ch., by 
Mrs. T. B. McLeod, barrel and 

package 165 00 

L. B. S. of South Ch., by Sarah 

L. Towl, box 203 96 

L. B. S. of Tompkins Ave. Ch., 
by Sarah M. Higgins, barrel 

and package 135 26 

Buffalo, N. Y., Y. P. S. C. E. of 
Niagara Square Ch., barrel and 

freight 1 18 

Chicago, 111., Woman's Asso. of 
South Ch., by M. E. L. Root, 
two barrels 104 43 



Claremont, N. H., by Fannie S. 

Goss, barrel $60 00 

Cleveland, Ohio, Ladies' Asso. of 

Euclid Ave. Ch., by Mrs. W. L. 

Foster, three barrels 31589 

Collinsville, Conn., VV. H. M. S., 

by Alice R. Williams, box 12900 

Coventry, Vt., W. H. M. U., by 

Mrs. M. L. Pearson, box 30 00 

Dover, N. H., First Ch., by H. E. 

Wyatt, barrel 59 50 

Ellington, Conn., L. B. S., by Mrs. 

E. F. Miller, barrel and package. 136 02 

Elyria, Ohio, Ladies' Asso. of First 

Ch., by C. E. Crandall, barrel.. 46 10 

Gaines, N. Y., Missionary Union, 

by Mrs. Frank Lattin, barrel 19 31 

Hartford, Conn., Ladies' Soc. of 
Asylum Hill Ch., by Mrs. S. M. 
Capron, two boxes 258 61 

L. H. M. S. of Farmington Ave. 
Ch., by Miss Florence M. Ccne, 

box 134 31 

Independence, Iowa, New England 

Ch., by Mrs. E. M. Potwin, bar- 
rel 40 55 



April, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



261 



Kensington, Conn., Ladies' Sew. 
Soc, by Mrs. Arthur Upson, bar- 
rel $44 00 

Lewis, Iowa, First Ch., by Mrs. 
M. E. McElroy, box 3400 

Litchfield, Conn., L. H. M. S., 
by Fannie E. Coit, box 10400 

Meriden, N. H., W. M. S., by Chas. 
F. Robinson, box 1600 

Middletown, Conn., L. H. M. S. 
of First Ch., by Mrs. A. R. Crit- 
tenden, two barrels and box 17500 

Mt. Vernon, N. Y., W. M. S. of 
First Ch., by Mrs. F. M. Way, 
barrel and check 71 25 

Munnsville, N. Y., Ladies, by 
Miss Mary Gaston, box 2000 

New Britain, Conn., First Ch., by 

Emma L. Pickett, two boxes 200 02 

New Haven, Conn., L. H. M. S. 
of First Ch., by Mary E. Ben- 
nett, six boxes 1,085 62 

United Ch., by Mrs. H. S. De 
Forest, two boxes 245 47 

New York City, Forest Ave. Ch., 
by Mrs. E. D. Clark, two bar- 
rels 18 00 

North Fairfield, L. M. S. of First 
Ch., by Virginia H. Irwin, barrel. 36 33 

Norwich, Conn., H. M. S. of Sec- 
ond Ch., by Jennie H. Bushnell, 

box 98 65 

W. H. M. S. of Park Ch., by 
Louisa G. Lane, box 95 00 



Ottumwa, Iowa, Ladies of First 
Ch., by Mrs. A. D. Moss, two 
barrels $75 00 

Portsmouth, N. H., H. M. S. of 
North Ch., by Katharine Sweet- 
ser, box and barrel 98 72 

Rupert, Vt., Ladies, by Mrs. B. 
W. Ewen, box and cash 3500 

St. Louis, Mo., H. M. S. of Cen- 
tral Ch., by Eveleen Mullen, two 
barrels 149 12 

Sidney, N. Y., by Mrs. G. S. Arms, 
barrel 18 40 

Stonington, Conn., W. C. H. M. 
Aux. of First Ch., by Emma A. 
Smith, barrel 65 00 

Swanton, Vt., VV. H. M. S., by 
Mrs. E. J. Ranslow, box 81 70 

Terryville, Conn., Benev. Soc, by 

Mrs. W. H. Scott, two barrels... 89 94 

Thompson, Conn., H. M. S., by 

Mrs. J. Scott Lewis, barrel 101 66 

Warsaw, N. Y., by Mary D. Jenks, 
box 100 00 

West Cornwall, Conn., L. B. S. of 
Second Ch., by Miss Fannie L. 
Rogers, barrel 69 07 

Winthrop, Iowa, also Castleville, 
Gatesville, and Quasqueton, by 
Laura G. W. Eddy, two boxes... 84 00 



$5,496 41 



Receipts for February, igoo 



Ithaca, N. Y., L. M. S. of First 
Ch., by C. M. Whiton, barrel $12 00 

St. Paul, Minn., L. M. S. of St. 
Anthony Park Ch., by Mrs. E. S. 
Pressey, two barrels 61 00 



Washington, D. C, L. H. M. S. of 
First Ch., by Alice H. Clark, two 
boxes and two packages 



$205 50 
$278 50 



262 



The Home Missionary 



April, 1900 



AUXILIARY STATE RECEIPTS 



MASSACHUSETTS HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 



Receipts of the Massachusetts Home Missionary Society in December^ i8gg. 
Edwin B. Palmer, Treasurer 



Rev. 



Acton, by H. F. Tuttle $15 00 

Amherst, North, by E. H. Dick- 
inson 29 49 

South, by Rev. J. F. Gleason 11 16 

Ashby, by C. F. Hayward 1922 

Attleboro, South, Bethany Chapel, 

C. E. Soc, by Mabel M. Carpen- 
ter, Christmas offering 400 

Barnstable, Centerville, by Rev. B. 

H. Weston, Taft thank-offering. . 

Barre, by Abner R. Mott 

Berkley, by Rev. W. R. Jcyslin.... 
Boston, A Friend, A. F. S 

Charlestown, Winthrop, by Geo. 
S. Poole 

Dorchester, Pilgrim, by Arthur 
Dempster 

Jamaica Plain, Central, by F. A. 
Farrar, remnant 

Leavitt, Mrs. Mary Clement 

Old South, by Joseph H. Gray. 
Toward salary of Rev. G. Fos- 
ter, by J. H. Gray 

Park St., by Geo. M. Butler.... 

E. R. Rankin 

Soc, Income of M. P. Gay 

bequest, by Chas. S. Lewis... 

Boxford, First, by Dan'l W. Co- 

nant 

Braintree, South, by H. B. Whit- 
man 

Bridgewater, Scotland, by Mrs. S. 

O. Keith 

Brockton (Campello), South, by 

F. P. Mills, to const. Lewis W. 

Pearson L. M. of C. H. M. S.. 

Waldo, by Waldo Nash 

Brookline, Harvard, by J. H. Shap- 
leigh 

Leyden, Add'l, by Geo. E. Adams 

Cambridge, Mrs. W. H. Hidden... 

Cambridgeport, Hope Ch. and S 

S., by Rev. C. M. Carpenter 

Pilgrim, by N. H. Holbrook 

Carlisle, by Miss Sarah L. Davis.. 
Chatham, by Rev. D. W. Richard- 
son 

Chelmsford, No. Second, by A. H. 

Sheldon 

Chelsea, Central, by L. H. Watts. 

Third, by John Bell 

Chicopee (Falls), Second, by Chas. 

A. Taylor 

Cohasset, Second, by Philander 

Bates 

Dalton, First, by H. A. Barton, to 

const. Mrs. John D. Carson, Mrs. 

Edward B. Hume, Mrs. Louisa 

Davis, and Mrs. Laura J. Foster 

L. Ms. of C. H. M. S 218 71 

Dedham, First S. S., by Miss H. A. 

Guild 7 70 



5 

io3 


00 

SO 


6 


50 


10 


00 


57 


64 


44 


10 




25 


5 

640 


00 

00 


300 
196 


00 

5i 


5 


00 


15 


00 


30 


00 


8 


50 


2 


24 


52 00 
8 iS 


503 
28 


01 

00 


10 


00 


15 
31 


00 

36 


S 


00 


8 


00 


4 50 


4 04 
26 80 


37 


12 


3i 


59 



Dudley, First, by W. H. Upham.. $3 00 

Easthampton, First, by W. H. 

Wright 18 36 

Easton, by J. W. Gilliatt 25 04 

Enfield, by L. D. Potter 3969 

Erving, by Rev. J. W. Brownville. 4 00 

Fitchburg, German Evan. Ch. and 

C. E. Soc, by Rev. S. H. 

Schwab 10 00 

Framingham, South, Grace, by G. 

M. Amsden 

Gloucester, West, by Rev. Temple 

Cutler, Taft thank-offering 

Goshen, by C. N. Shaw 

Granville, East, by Rev. W. H. 

Sterns 

Great Barrington, First, by C. R. 

Sabin 

Greenfield, Second (in part), by 

Mrs. Ida A. C. Lowell 

Gurney, R. C. Fund — Income of.... 
Hale, E. J. M. Fund — Income of.. 
Halifax, Ch. and C. E. Soc, by 

Mrs. L. H. Grover 

Hanson, First, by Abbie J. Clark. 
Haverhill, C. E. Union, by Geo. 

E. Seavey 

Ward Hill, by H. P. Waldo.... 

Hawley, by Tyler T. Clark 

Hingham, by R. W. E. Vining.... 

Holbrook, A Friend 

Holden, by Mrs. M. E. Warren 

Holliston, by Rev. N. Vander Pyl. 
Hyde Park, First, by E. A. Run- 

nells 37 39 

Lawrence, Armenian residents, for 
local Armenian work, by Rev. 
W. E. Wolcott, $35.* 

Lawrence St., for local Armenian 

work, by W. L. Warden, $125.* 

Lee, Ch., $615; S. S., $30, by J. L. 

Kilbon 64500 

Lenox, by Frank J. Barrett 2764 

Lincoln, First, by Rev. E. E. Brad- 
ley 163 00 

Littleton, Orth., by Miss A. J. 

Cutter 14 00 

Lowell, First, for local foreign 

work, $43-58.* 
Lynn Central, by I. K. Harris, 
W. P. G., to const. John L. 
Parker and Caleb W. Marsh 
L. Ms 2500 

First, by Miss C. M. Staton 44 00 

North, by Anthony Earle, for 
Armenian work, $25.10.* 
Maiden, A Friend 5 00 

First, by Chas. F. Belcher 165 60 

Marblehead, First, Jr. C. E. Soc, 

by N. P. Sanborn, for Alaska. ... 7 00 

Marshfield, First, by H. B. 

Sprague 1965 



100 


00 


35 
7 


63 
62 


5 


00 


3i 


03 


37 
23 


64 
62 


54 


22 


25. 


.00 


4 29 


10 


00 


3 
3 

3 


00 
60 
87 




70 


10 


25 


10 


00 



•Received and credited on special account. 



April, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



263 



Middleboro, North, by Chas. S. 

Tinkham $36 27 

Millis, by Rev. W. H. Wheelock. 15 00 

Medway, West, Second, by James 

M. Fales 9 25 

Montague, First, by Sariford 

Marsh 6 45 

Newburyport, North, by J. B. 

Creasey 22 00 

New Marlboro, by Gilbert Hollis- 

ter 4 20 

Newton (Newtonville), Central, by 

L. E. Moore 6100 

(West), Second, by J. J. Eddy.. 78747 
Northampton, Edwards, by Geo. L. 

Metcalf 18 00 

North Attleboro, Oldtown, by C. E. 

Jordan S 33 

Trinity, by Rev. C. A. Ratcliffe.. 26 00 

North Reading, Union, by Rev. E. 

E. Colburn* 10 00 

Orange, North, by Miss M. L. C. 

Blodgett 800 

Palmer (Thorndike), First, by C. 

F. Smith 19 78 

Pepperell, by Chas. Crosby 4050 

Pittsfield, South, Members, by 

F. E. Peirson 1000 

Raynham, First, by N. G. Shurt- 

leff 15 20 

North, by Rev. S. K. B. Perkins. 3 40 
Reed, Dwight Fund — Income of.... 40 50 
Rochester, First, by Geo. B. Has- 
kell 25 50 

North, by Geo. H. Randall 600 

Rockport, First, C. E. Soc, by 

Miss A. M. Hutchins 1700 

First, Pastor's Bible Class, by 

Rev. I. Ainsworth 14 50 

Pigeon Cove, Swede Ch., by Axel 

Anderson 5 00 

Royalston, First, by Colin Macken- 
zie 616 

(South), Second, by E. L. Rich.. 7 00 

Rutland, Mrs. S. D. Spooner 5 00 

Salem, South, by Jos. A. Dane 141 90 

Tabernacle, by C. R. Washburn.. 50 07 

Sandisfield, by Mrs. S. J. Hawley. 2 75 

Somerville, Broadway, C. E. Soc, 

by C. L. Ogilvie 20 00 

Southboro (Southville), Second, by 

Samuel R. Day 2 50 

Southbridge, by Edwin S. Swift... 42 75 

South Carolina, A Friend, by Rev. 

Geo. H. Johnson 2500 

South Hadley Falls, by A. N. 

Chapin 8 70 

Springfield Memorial, by Henry N. 

Bowman 102 50 

Olivet, by J. W. Nourbourn 20 56 

Swede, Evang. Ch., by Rev. G. 
Lindstrom 6 35 



Taunton, Trinitarian, by A. E. 
Williams, to const. E. L. Hutch- 
inson, Mrs. H. L. Goff, C. J. 
Smerdon, Lucy B. Bliss, Mrs. 
Mattie J. Maynard, Geo. Sher- 
man, and Sallie W. Hall L. Ms.. $230 31 
Templeton, Baldwinsville, by Mrs. 

C. A. Smith 

Truro, by Eben F. Paine 

Wall, Fund — Income of 

Wellesley Hills, by L. V. N. Peck. 
Wendell, by Mrs. E. L. Baker.... 
Wenham, by Mrs. Frances Perkins. 
West Boylston, First, by E. B. 

Rice 

Westfield, Second, by R. L. Scott.. 
Weymouth, South, Old South, by 

Rev. H. C. Alvord 

Whitcomb, David, Fund— Income 

of 

Whitney, Fund — Income of 

Winchendon, First, by Rev. G. W. 

Jones , 

North, by H. S. Allen 

Winchester, First S. S., by E. H. 
Rice, for Rev. W. M. Wellman, 

Darlington, Okla 

Windsor, by Rev. Geo. Sterling. . . . 
Woburn, Scand. Ch., by Rev. L. 

Akeson 

Worcester, Damon, Mrs. Harriet 
W., Est. of, by Frank H. Wig- 
gin, Trustee 

Plymouth, by F. W. Chase 

Woman's Home Missionary Asso- 
ciation, by Miss L. D. White, 
Treas. : 
Toward salary and expenses of 
Miss Junek, Pole Bible Read- 
er, $57-25.* 
Toward salary of Mrs. I. N. 
Tillinghast, of French-Amer- 
ican College 50.00 

Boston, Roxbury, Walnut Ave. 
Aux., toward salary of Rev. 

S. Deakin 54'82 

West Springfield, First Aux., 

for Alaskan work 1000 

Winchester, First, Ladies' 
Western Miss. Soc, for Wom- 
an's Dept. in French-Amer- 
ican College 81 08 



21 


00 


7 92 


37 


00 


7 


00 


5 


00 


13 


00 


2 


31 


2b 


99 


II 


00 


290 79 


200 


00 


Q 


00 


127 


18 


20 


00 


14 


00 


5 


00 


3 


67 


'23 


22 



Home Missionary. 



$7,120 84 
3 60 

$7,124 44 



Receipts for January, igoo 



Abington, First, by J. T. Rich- 
mond $7 37 

Agawam, by R. De Witt 29 00 

Amesbury, Union, by John T. Bas- 

sett 11 00 

Andover, Free (add'l), by Mrs. 

Minnie C. Cole 2000 

South, by John Alden (of which 
$200 toward salary of Rev. R. B. 

Wright) 272 IS 

West, by F. S. Boutwell 3061 

Arlington, by E. H. Norris 119 83 



Athol, Evan., by C. A. Chapman.. $62 30 

Ayer, An Invalid 3 00 

Barnstable, West, by Rev. E. B. 

French 15 00 

Barre, " T " 1 00 

Bartholomew, Mrs. L. A., rem- 
nant 70 

Belmont, Waverley, by Rev. Geo. 

P. Gilman 5 00 

Beverley, Washington St., by C. L. 

Perry 20 00 

Boston, Allston, by F. B. Wheeler. 100 34 



*Received and credited on special account. 



164 



The Home Missionary 



April, 190c 



Allston, S. S., by Walter V. Bat- 
son 

Charlestown, Winthrop, by Geo. 

S. Poole 

Collection Env., Anonymous 

Dorchester, Second, John L. 

Barry, by Miss E. Tolman 

E. C. A. Day Band, by Mrs. 

E. F. Merrill 

Wilder, Mrs. E. B., by Miss 

E. Tolman 

Village, by H. D. Hutchinson.. 
Old South, balance of Rev. Mr. 

Foster's salary 

Richardson, Mrs. Mary Tyler 

Roslindale, by W. H. Warner 

Roxbury, Walnut Ave., by C. H. 

W. Wood (add'l) 

Shawmut, by D. E. Partridge.... 

By D. E. P., special to Rev. P. 

A. Simpkin, Gallup, N. Mex. 

Swede Evan., by G. F. Soder- 

gren 

W. H. White, for Greek work in 

French-American College 

Braintree, First, by A. H. Cobb.. 
Brockton, Porter, by Chas. P. Hol- 
land 

(Campello) South, S. S., by L. T. 

Copeland 

Brookline, Harvard, by Jas. H. 

Shapleigh 

By Jas. H. Shapleigh, special 

for Italian work 

Bulgaria, *' W. W.," by A. B. C. 

F. M _ 

Cambridgeport, Pilgrim, by N. H. 

Holbrook 

Carver, North, by Benj. W. Rob- 
bins . . -. 

Charlton, by F. O. Wakefield 

Chelsea, Central, S. S. Class of 
Mrs. R. H. Allen, special New 

Year's gift 

. First, by C. A. Bacon 

Chicopee, Third, by William J. 

Fuller 

China, Tung Chow, Rev. F. D. 

Wilder, by A. B. C. F. M 

Clinton, First, Evan., by Edward 

L. Greene 

Dalton, Miss Clara L Crane 

Mrs. Jas. B. Crane 

Miss Mollie Crane 

W. M. Crane 

Zenas Crane 

Mrs. Z. M. Crane 

Dedham, First, by Geo. W. 

Humphrey 

Douglas (East)j Second, by T. II. 

Meek 

Erving, by Rev. J. W. Brownville.. 
Essex, South, Conference, by Rev. 
T. F. Waters, work among for- 
eign pop., $10.* 
Everett, Mrs. F. Corbin, remnant. 
Fall River, First, by E. S. Thayer, 
Falmouth, North, by Ward"Eldred. 
Fitchburg, Rollstone, by David 

Lowe 

Foxboro, Phelps, Mrs. Mary N 

Framingham, Plymouth, by John 

H. Temple 

Freetown, Assonet, by G. M. Nich- 
ols 

Frost, Rufus S., Fund — Income of. 
Gloucester, Trinity, by Joseph O. 

Procter 

Granby (add'l), by Rev. R. C. Bell. 



$13 00 



6S 
1 


75 

00 


10 


00 


10 


00 


S 00 
14 29 


300 

5 
36 


00 
00 
55 


7 04 

218 86 


10 


00 


6 


91 


5 00 
14 42 


45 24 


11 


05 


86 76 


26 


03 


10 


00 


13 


36 


3° 
19 


00 
35 


25 
38 


00 
52 



28 


44 


300 


00 


200 


00 


150 


00 


250 


00 


250 


00 


300 


00 


151 


00 


43 


08 


10 


on 




70 


121 


12 


25 


00 


34 


65 


5° 


00 


82 


75 


5 


45 


3 n 


00 


97 


80 


20 


00 



Great Barrington, First, by Clar- 
ence R. Sabin 

Greenfield, First, by C. W. Dins- 
more 

Hadley, First, by Agnes Ayres.... 

S. S., by E. A. Randall 

North, by C. S. Abbott, to const. 

one L. M 

Haverhill, Bradford, by S. W. 

Carleton 

North, by E. G. Frothingham 

West, C. E. Soc, by E. A. Em- 
erson 

S. S., by H. A. Poore 

Hingham, Evan., Add'l, by W. E. 

Vining 

Holyoke, Second, Ladies' Prayer 
Circle, by Mrs. F. H. Chamber- 

lin 

Huntington, Second, by Rev. G. 

W. Fiske 

Ipswich, First, by Lucy R. Farley. 
South, by Rev. T. Frank Waters. 
Jessup, C. A., Fund — Income of... 
Lawrence, Law. St., by W. L. War- 
den 

Leicester, by David Bemis 

Lexington, Hancock, by A. C. 

Stone 

Lincoln, by Rev. E. E. Bradley, 

Add'l 

Lowell, Kirk St., by A. L. Thomp- 
son 

Pawtucket, Ch., $10; C. E. Soc, 

$5. by J. J. Colton 

Swede Evan., by Nills O. Del- 

gren 

Maiden, A Friend 

Mansfield, Orth., by S. E. Scholes. 
Marion, S. S., by Susan A. Conro. 
Medford, West, by Henry M. 

Clapp 

Medway, Village (add'l), by J. T. 

Adams 

Middleborro, Central S. S., by W. 

R. Mitchell 

Millbury, First, by Carolyn E. 

Waters 

Mrs. Louisa S. Putnam, by Rev. 

Geo. A. Putnam 

Natick, First, by Bertha L. Ran- 
dall 

South, John Eliot, by Rev. M. V. 

B. Bartlett 

New Marlboro, Mill River, by Rev. 

J. B. Lewis 

Newton, Auburndale, by C. C. 
Burr, special 

(Center), First, by J. E. Rock- 
wood 

Eliot, by Geo. N. Putnam 

C. E. Soc, by C. S. Ensign 

Highlands, "Old Glory" 

North Adams, by W. W. Richmond 
Northampton, First, by J. H. 

Searle , 

Northbridge, Whitinsville, E. C. A. 

Day Band, by Mrs. C. E. Whitin. 
North Brookfield, First, by H. F. 

Moore 

Oakham, by W. S. Crawford 

Orange, Swede, by J. A. Edman.. 
Oxford, First. Woman's Miss. Soc, 

by L. D. Stockwell 

Palmer, Three Rivers, by Thomas 

D. Frame 

Parkhurst, E. C, Fund — Income of. 
I'ittsfield, First, by Frank W. Dut- 

ton 



$17 00 

10 00 
^^ 06 
15 00 



50 00 
200 00 



4 47 
15 66 



13 


00 


55 

38 


19 

00 


150 


00 


40 18 
60 46 


132 


SS 


3' 


50 


296 


90 


15 


00 


6 


00 


100 


00 


30 


00 


2 


29 


20 


00 


14 


00 


5 37 


23 


08 


5 


00 


150 


00 


10 


84 


11 


34 


200 


00 


1 So 
42S 


84 
oS 


10 


72 


50 


00 


104 04 


219 75 


1685 


10 


22 


IS 


00 


4 


00 


6 66 


50 


00 


15 


00 



•Received and credited on special account. 



April, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



265 



Plymouth, Pilgrimage, by C. F. 

Cole $1800 

Princeton, by Rev. Chas. A. White. 87 94 

Quincy, Bethany, by Caroline S. 

Hubbard 51 00 

Reading, by Dean Peabody 3000 

Esther Emerson, Est of, by A. 

F. Emerson, Exec 10398 

Reed, D wight Fund — Income of.. 20250 
Richmond, Ch., $2.87; C. E. Soc, 

$8.03, by C. H. Dorr 10 90 

Rockland, by L. D. Perkins, to 

const. Fannie K. Studley L. M. 

of C. H. M. S 5° 00 

Rockport, First (of which $5 from 

Z. A. A.), by Zeno A. Appleton. 15 10 

Rowley, by Woodbury Smith _.. 13 10 

Royalston, First, special, by Colin 

Mackenzie 25 55 

Sharon, by D. W. Pettee 1627 

Somerset, by Cora W. Luther 10 16 

Springfield, Emmanuel, by N. Lom- 
bard 4 00 

Stoneham, Mrs. E. B. Smiley, 

thank-offering 5 00 

Sunderland, A Member (add'l), by 

W. L. Hubbard 1900 

Swampscott, First, by Rev. D. E. 

Burtner 29 00 

Townsend, by J. W. Eastman 7 53 

Wakefield, by W. P. Preston 2962 

Waltham, Trin., by T. W. Temple.. 28 12 

Westport, Pacific Union, S. S., by 

J. C. Macomber 15 03 

West Springfield, Ashley School 

and Charity Fund, by Ethan 

Brooks 182 40 

Weymouth, South, Old South, by 

Rev. H. C. Alvord 10 00 

Whitcomb, David, Fund — Income 

of 132 50 

Tremont Bank, Liq. Div'd. 

for reinvestment 400 00 

Whitin, J. C. Fund — Income of 120 00 

Wilbraham, First, by F. E. Clark.. 20 00 



Williamsburg, Haydenville, by C. 

D. Waite $ 7 01 

Williamstown, by C. C. Cole 7656 

White Oaks, C. E. Soc, by Rev. 

G. V. Stryker 7 82 

Winchester, First, by H. A. 

Wheeler 106 89 

By H. A. Wheeler, for foreign 
population, $33.32.* 

Wcburn, First, by J. W. Fox 240 78 

Montvale, by Mrs. J. A. Hall 5 00 

Worcester, Central, by G. W. 

Mackintire 303 33 

Mrs. H. W. Damon, Est. of, by 

F. II. Wiggin, Trustee 1649 

Hope, C. E. Soc, by E. W. Phil- 
lips, for Alaskan work 15 00 

Piedmont, by A. W. Eldred 50 00 

Union, by T. H. Reed 104 43 

Bible School, by C. W. New- 
hall 32 16 

Xenophon, special for Cleveland, 

Ohio, Bohemian work 1000 

Yarmouth, First, by E. D. Payne, 

Treas 60 13 

Woman's Home Missionary Asso- 
ciation, by Miss Lizzie D. 
White, Treas. : 
Grant toward salary of Mrs. Til- 
linghast, of French-American 

College 50 00 

For Miss J. Junek, Pole Bible 
Reader, $33.42.* 
Greenwich Aux., for general 

work S 32 

Boston, Roxbury, Walnut Ave. 
Aux., toward salary of Rev. S. 
Deakin 105 68 



161 00 



Home Missionary. 



'.745 30 
12 30 



,757 60 



Receipts for February, igoo 



Amherst, College, by Levi H. El- 
well 

Arlington, Park Ave., by C. T. 
Parsons 

Bank balances, quarterly interest 
on 

Barre (add'l), A Member, by Rev. 

J. F. Gaylord 

S. S., by Maude B. Hancock 

Bernardston, Goodale Mem'l, C. E. 
Soc, by Mrs. H. L. Crowell. . . . . . 

Boston, Boylston, by G. E. S. Kin- 
ney 

Park St., by G. M. Butler 

"T. G. " 

Boxboro, Evan., by A. W. Wether- 
bee 

Braintree, First, A Member 

Cambridge, E. D. Leavitt 

North Ave., by Adam K. Wilson. 

Charlemont, by Rev. Geo. H. 
Pratt 

Chelsea, Mrs. A. H. Palmer 

Concord, Norwegian Evan., by 
Rev. O. O. Thorpe 

Dartmouth, South, C. E. Soc, by 
Miss Jane R. Baker 



$ao 


27 


15 


00 


39 77 


5 
3 


00 

16 


4 


00 


55 
1 


02 

00 


30 


00 


18 


00 


7 

300 
104 


00 
00 
50 


18 


16 




50 


10 


00 


8 


00 



Dunstable, by William P. Proctor. 

East Bridgewater, Union, by Geo. 
M. Keith 

Easthampton, First, by W. H. 
Wright 

Erving, (add'l), by Rev. J. W. 
Brownville 

Foxboro, Bethany, Hannah Pay- 
son Est. Annuity, by T. B. Bon- 
ner, Trustee 

Georgetown, First, S. S., by H. A. 
Holmes 

Harvard, by J. W. Bacon 

Haverhill, West, by Walter F. 
Poore 

Hawley, by Tyler T. Clark 

Holyoke, French Evan., by Rev. 
C. H. Vessot 

Lancaster, Evan., by Leander Row- 
ell 

S. S., Penny Coll., by Miss E. 
F. Merrick 

Lawrence, United, S. S., by H. G. 
Mank 

Lincoln (add'l), by Rev. E. E. 
Bradford 



$38 80 

4 15 
39 85 

2 00 

5 00 



5 


00 


7 


00 


10 


00 


4 


00 


4 


00 


39 


22 


5 


00 


5 


00 


6 


75 



•Received and credited on special account. 



266 



The Home Missionary 



April, 1900 



Lowell, Arm. population, for local 
Armenian work, $20.* 

First Trin. Cong., by I. W. Bis- 
bee, for local Arm. work, 
$18.13;* local Greek work, 
„ $35-39-* 

Mass., A Friend $1000 

Medfield, by Rev. L. M. Pierce — 

Taft thank-offering 16 00 

Medford, West, C. E. Soc, by H. 

M. Clapp 8 00 

Newburyport, Mrs. Sophia C. Hale. 100 00 

New Salem, by D. A. Stowell 821 

Oxford, by Rev. W. N. T. Dean, 

to const. Miss Mary E. Knowl- 

ton a L. M 50 00 

Petersham, C. E. Soc, by Geo. 

Wilder 2 70 

Reed, Dwight Fund — Income of 64 00 

Rochester, East, by Geo. P. Morse. 12 50 

Rockland, Betsey A. Hicks, by L. 

D. Perkins 400 

Shrewsbury, by Henry Harlow 900 

Southbridge, Globe Village, Evan. 

Free, by Frank E. Randall 1000 

Spencer, First, by F. E. Dunton.. 314 38 
Springfield, Hope, by Jas. B. 

Keene, special coll 4000 

Olivet, by H. A. Stowell 15 12 

Special for Rev. C. W. Fra- 

zer, Fla 3 00 

Sutton, Wilkinsonville, A Friend, 

to const. Jas. T. Shirley L. M. 

of C. H. M. S So 00 

" T." 5000 

Ware, Alary F. Andrews, Est. of, 

by H. B. Anderson, Exec 20000 

Warren, by Eugene F. Wood 93 72 

Wayland, by F. H. Fowler 825 

Webster, S. S., Prim. Dept., by 

Miss fi. T. Larchar 4 00 

Wellesley Hills, C. E. Soc, by 

L. V. N. Peck 14 55 

West Boylston, First, by E. B. 

Rice 910 



Westfield, First, by M. E. Searle 
(of which $10.22 is a Union serv- 
ice collection) 

Westhampton, by E. H. Montague. 
West Newbury, Second, by P. H. 

Nason 

West Springfield, Park St., by Rob- 
ert D. White 

Westwood, Islington, by Rev. W. 

F. Bickford 

Whitcomb, David Fund — Income of 
Whitin, J. C. Fund — Bonds called, 
proceeds for reinvestment, 
net, $1,049.50! 

Income of 

Williamstown, Franklin Carter, 

LL.D 

(South) Second, by Frank S. 

Young 

Winchester, First, by Henry M. 

Shepard 

D. W. Wright 

Worcester, Harriet W. Damon, 
Est. of, by F. H. Wiggin, 

Trustee 

First (Old South), by Hollis W. 

Cobb 

Woman's Home Missionary Asso- 
ciation, Miss Lizzie D. White, 
Treas. : 
Grant toward salary of Mrs. I. 
N. Tillinghast, .of French- 
American College 

Grant toward salary of Miss J. 

Junek, Pole Bible Reader, $30.* 

Boston, Roxbury, Walnut Ave. 

Aux., toward salary of Rev. S. 

Deakin 



1158 

23 


47 
10 


4 37 


45 27 


S 

it) 


00 

00 


16 66 


100 


00 


10 


00 


68 
7 


43 

00 


3 


67 


45 


28 



50 00 



32 00 



82 00 



Home Missionary 



$2,556 99 
3 or 

$2,559 99 



- ILLINOIS HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 

Receipts of the Illinois Home Missionary Society in September, October, and November, 
iSgg. AARON B. MEAD, Treasurer 



Albion 

Anna 

Atkinson 

Austin, Swedish 

Batavia 

Belvidere 

Bloomington 

Cable 

Chesterfield 

Chicago, First, S. S., $6.24 

Plymouth 

New England S. S 

Union Park 

Leavitt Street 

Central Park Y. P. S. C. E 

Lake View S. S 

California Ave. Y. P. S. C. E.. 

Englewood, North 

Mizpah Chapel 

Rogers Park 

First Lutheran 

Fellowship 



$21 00 
2 60 
5 38 
5 00 
7689 
15 00 
28 50 

2 69 
23 83 

48 78 
10 00 

IS 85 

10 00 

44 09 

3 95 
10 00 
25 00 
17 00 

1 99 
75 

5 00 

2 50 



Clifton 

Danville, Mrs. A. M. Swan 

Denver, St. Alban's 

Dover, S. S 

Edelstein 

Elmwood 

Evanston Ladies' Soc. (Special). 

Fall Creek 

Farlow Grove 

Farmington, Mrs. Haskell 

Frankfort 

Geneva 

Glen Ellyn 

Granville, Jun. Y. P. S. C. E... 

Griggsville 

Grossdale 

Harvey 

Hennepin 

Hinsdale 

Kewanee, H. S. Lay 

La Grange 

Lawn Ridge 



$10 00 

6 00 

20 50 

5 00 

1 20 
10 20 
10 00 
25 00 

3 00 

20 00 
5 00 

10 30 
13 80 
19 00 

21 00 

11 59 
10 13 

2 00 
8 94 

75 00 

62 00 

2 67 



•Received and credited on special account. 
fHeld for reinvestment by conditions of the fund. 



April, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



267 



Loda $12 85 

Lyonsville 40 02 

Marseilles, Mrs. H. E. Baughman. 100 00 

Marshall 37 60 

Milburn, Y. P. S. C. E 500 

Mount Palatine, S. S 450 

Normal, First 3 75 

Oak Park, First 337 54 

Second, S. S 1245 

Oswego 15 00 

Ottawa 69 ss 

Payson 17 17 

Peoria, First, Martin Kingman.... 2500 

Peru 4 00 

Poplar Grove 26 70 

Prophetstown 25 71 

Rantoul 5 60 

Rockford, Second 50 20 

Rollo 1 1 00 

Rosemond ..., 790 

Roseville 10 55 

Sandwich 35 00 

Seward, Second 20 80 

Shaw 25 00 

South Danville, Rev. Jas. Hayes.. 2 50 

Stillman Valley 25 30 

Waverly 2 75 

Winnebago 15 00 

Winnetka 29 50 

Woodburn, Bert Welch 291 

Woman's Home Missionary Union. 79 75 

Amboy 25 20 

Blue Island 15 00 

Brimfield 5 00 

Chicago, New England 30 00 

Lincoln Park 10 00 

Leavitt Street 1 00 

Pilgrim, Jun. End 5 00 

Bowmanville 22 90 



Douglas Park $1 50 

Grace, S. S 1 00 

Waveland Avenue 5 00 

Godfrey, Y. P. S. C. E 2 50 

Gridley 4 00 

Griggsville 3 61 

Grossdale 1 40 

La Grange 20 00 

Loda 22 00 

Mendon 22 50 

North Aurora 5 00 

Oak Park, First SS So 

Second 1845 

Ottawa 7s 50 

Peoria, First 5 00 

Pittsfield 2 50 

Rantoul 5 00 

Rockford, Second 54 00 

Rollo 5 00 

Seward (Kendal Co.), First & 

Second 17 00 

Wilmette 6 70 

Winnebago 5 00 

532 01 

Administrative Fund 73 61 

Supply Fee 10 00 

Rev. E. M. Williams 31 00 

Balance due on Dietrich Est., per 

A. B. Mead, Trustee 41996 

S. D. Bough ton 10 00 

Estate of Mrs. Elvira L. Richard- 
son, per W. S. Freeman, Atty. . 1,000 00 

H. S. Thsmpson 5 00 

Cash 14 78 



$3,805 14 



Receipts for December, ii 



Alton, Ch. of The Redeemer, S. S.. $10 00 

Avon, S. S 3 30 

Byron 20 00 

Cambridge 3 65 

Canton 20 06 

Carpentersville 16 50 

Champaign 131 67 

Chicago, First 29 73 

Leavitt Street 8 75 

Immanuel 2 00 

Dundee 30 78 

Elgin, First 20 11 

Evanston, First 5 00 

Gilchrist, Union S. S 86 

Geneva, Mrs. D. Martin 500 

Harvard 10 00 

Hinsdale 9 17 

Joy Prairie . . . ; 44 80 

La Grange 22 00 

Morris 6 40 

Naperville, German 3 00 

Oswego, Rev. F. W. Long 5 00 

Ottawa 39 54 

Park Ridge, German 536 

Payson ' 17 33 

Peoria, German 6 00 

Providence 15 00 

Sandwich 106 85 

Sterling 66 52 

Toulon 50 08 

Waukegan, German 7 50 

Wayne 11 go 

Winnebago 1 00 



Winnetka $23 45 

Yorkville 7 50 

Illinois Woman's Home Missionary 

Union 20 00 

Aurora, New England -. ... 500 

Carpentersville 3 00 

Champaign, Ch. (Danville) 200 

Chebanse 5 00 

Chicago, New England 600 

Union Park 10 00 

Covenant 4 25 

Dundee 20 00 

Elgin, First, S. S 1500 

Hinsdale, S. S 2 00 

Jacksonville, Y. L. M. S 5 00 

Oak Park, First 2240 

Second 10 00 

Odell, C. E. Soc 400 

Ottawa 25 00 

Rockford, First 25 00 

Second 9 25 

Rollo 5 00 

Sandwich 64 55 

Winnebago 5 00 



Sturges Land, per L. L. Kiser, 

Agt 

G. S. Needham 



267 45 



101 79 
50 00 



1,184 IS 



268 



The Home Missionary 



April, 1900 



MICHIGAN HOME MISSIONARY SOCIETY 



Receipts of the Michigan Home Missionary Society for December, i8gg. Rev. John 

P. Sanderson, Treasurer 



Almont 

Ann Arbor 

Benzonia, Y. P. S. C. E. 

Carmel 

Charlotte 

Chassell, Y. P. S. C. E... 

Clarksville 

Clinton 

Detroit, First 

Douglas 

Eaton Rapids, S. S 

Harrison 

Y. P. S. C. E 

Jr. Y. P. S. C. E 

Highland 

Hudson , 

Jackson, First 

Plym. Y. P. S. C. E... 
Lacota 



$33 25 

109 71 
3 00 
3 00 
20 00 
3 00 
6 00 
16 00 

179 IS 
12 70 
2 89 
16 00 
2 00 
2 00 
2 50 
53 40 

190 26 
9 03 
1 00 



Lansing, Plymouth 

Lewiston 

Y. P. S. C. E 

Ludington 

Maple City 

Memphis 

Muskegon, First 

Olivet 

St. John's 

Sandstone, Y. P. S. C. E. 

Sault Ste. Marie 

Solon 

South Haven 

Standish 

Webster 

Williamston 



W. H. M. U. of Mich. 



$5 80 
5 50 

8 00 
65 00 

2 60 

2 05 
21 97 

5 00 
7 00 
11 00 
5 00 

3 22 
26 20 

3 3i 

9 50 
1 00 

196 32 



Total $1,043 36 



Receipts of the Woman s Home Missionary Union of Michigan for December, iSqq. 
Mrs. E. F. Grabill, Treasurer 



Allendale, W. H. and F. M. S.... 

Almont, W. M. S 

Ann Arbor, W. H. M. S 

Benton Harbor, L. M. U 

Clare, W. H. M. S 

Detroit, Fort St. W. M. S 

Farwell, W. H. M. S 

Fremont, W. M. S 

Grand Haven, W. M. S 

Grand Ledge, W. H. M. S. and L. 
A. S 

Grand Rapids Park, W. H. M. S.. 

Grass Lake, W. H. M. S 

Harrison, \V. H. and F. M. S 

Hopkins Station, W. H. M. U 

Jackson, First, W. H. M. S 

Plymouth, W. H. M. S 

Lansing, Plymouth, W. H. M. S.. 

Leslie, First, W. H. M. S 

Second, W. H. M. S 

Michigan Center, W. H. M. S 

Muskegon, First, W. M. S 

Napoleon, Mrs. A. F. Colgrove, 
Mrs. A. A. Rexford 

Pinckney, W. H. M. S 

Red Jacket, W. M. S 

Saginaw, W. S 

Salem, Second, W. H. M. S 

Sandstone, W. H. M. S 

South Haven, W. M. S 

Traverse City, W. H. M. S 

Watervliet, W. H. M. S., pledge, 
$2.95; self-denial, $5; thank-offer- 
ing, $17.50 • 

Ypsilanti, W. H. M. S 



$5 


00 


6 


00 


47 


00 


1 


50 


12 


50 


2 


50 


7 25 


5 


00 


2 


00 


2 


50 


59 32 


10 


00 


5 


00 


14 


SO 


66 


11 


5 


00 


9 


57 


10 


50 


5 


00 


5 


00 


20 


00 


10 


15 


5 


00 


5 


59 


75 


00 


9 70 


3 


4" 


8 


50 


25 


00 


25 45 


12 


00 



YOUNG PEOPLES WORK. 

Detroit, First, Y. W. Union $2500 

Int. Y. P. S. C. E 5 00 

Brewster, Jr. C. E. S 300 

Hudson, Y. P. S. C. E 500 

Muskegon, First, Y. W. Covenant 

Circle 1000 

Coral Workers (M. B.) 3 50 

Pontiac, Y. L. M. U 1250 

South Haven, Y. P. S. C. E., an 

offering 1000 

$74 00 

Grand total $555 04 

Charlotte, L. B. S 2500 

Detroit, First, W. A 16000 

Grape, W. M. S 5 00 

Kalamazoo, W. H. M. U 1630 

Litchfield, Gen'l Miss. Soc 1500 

Olivet, L. B. S 1400 

South Lake Linden, W. U 1300 

Vermontville, W. H. M. U 232 

Victor, W. M. S 275 



YOUNG PEOPLE S FUND. 



Detroit, Fort St. Jr. C. E. S 

First, Int., S. S. Dept 

Grand Rapids Park, Y. L. M. S. 

for salary of Stephen Vaughn 



$253 37 

$1 00 
1 81 

25 00 

27 81 

,$281 18 



Receipts of the Michigan Home Missionary Society for January, /goo. Rev. John 

P. Sanderson, Treasurer 



Brimley 

Carsonville 

Central Lake 

Charlevoix, Y. P. S. 
Chelsea 



C. E.. 



$2 00 

4 00 

6 00 

11 80 

107 04 



Chester, Second . , 

Chesterfield 

Clinton 

Detroit, Brewster 
Douglas 



$6 00 
8 00 
5 00 

25 00 
1 00 



April, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



269 



Eaton Rapids $24 55 

Ellsworth 5 00 

Flat Rock 1 40 

Gaylord 23 75 

Grand Blanc 25 00 

Grand Haven 10 50 

S. S S 00 

Y. P. S. C. E S 00 

Hancock 15 00 

Helena 1 53 

Johnstown and Barry 6 00 

Kalamazoo 32 52 

Kalkaska 4 40 

Lamont 7 00 

Lansing, Pilgrim, Y. P. S. C. E., 

Jr 1 00 

Ludington, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. N. 
Stray, to constitute Mrs. Jane 
Burns life member of C. H. 

M. S So 00 

Milletts 5 00 



Mulliken $22 55 

Nunica 2 00 

Port Huron, First 1500 

Port Sanilac 5 00 

Red Jacket 15 00 

Reed City 38 24 

S. S 10 00 

Rockford, Y. P. S. C. E 2 69 

Rondo 5 00 

Saginaw 25 00 

Salem, Second 18 73 

Standish 06 

Vanderbilt 419 

Vicksburg 21 00 

Vienna 9 25 

W. H. M. U. of Mich., by Mrs. 

E. F. Grabill, Treas 74256 

A Friend 40 00 

A Friend 200 00 

Total $i,574 7°" 



Receipts of the Woman's Home Missionary Union of Michigan for January, /goo. 
Mrs. E. F. Grabill, Treasurer 



Breckenridge, W. M. S $500 

Bridgeman, W. M. S 5 00 

Chelsea, W. M. S 1550 

Detroit, Woodward Ave. W. Union. 43 75 

Dexter, W. H. M. S 6 00 

Dorr, L. M. S., Martha Gilbert 

Memorial Fund 18 00 

Grand Rapids, South, W. M. S.... 6 00 

Greenville, W. H. M. S 600 

Hersey, Ladies' Aid Soc 1 05 

Highland Station, W. H. M. S.... 11 00 

Lawrence, W. M. S 2 50 

Mancelona, W. H. M. S 1500 

Manistee, W. H. M. S 25 00 

Ovid, W. Gen'l M. S 800 

Pontiac, W. M. S 1 50 

Somerset, W. M. S 1375 



Stanton, W. H. M. S. 
Three Oaks, W. M. U. 



YOUNG PEOPLE'S FUND. 

Cheboygan S. S., a Christmas offer- 
ing 

Hudson Intermediate C. E. Soc 

Junior C. E. Soc 

Owosso, Y. P. S. C. E 



Total for the month. 



$10 98 
9 55 



$203 58 



1 00 

10 00 

$23 33 
$226 91 



Receipts of the Michigan 



Home Missionary Society for February , igoo. Rev. John 
P. Sanderson, Treasiwer 



Ada, First 

Second 

Allegan 

Bay Mills 

Bellaire 

Benzonia 

Big Rapids, First... 

Bradley 

Charlotte 

Chase 

Copemish 

Custer 

Detroit, First 

Woodward Ave.... 

East Paris 

Flint 

Freeport 

Grand Blanc 

Grand Rapids, First. 

Grand Junction 

Kalamazoo 

Lacey 

Lake Linden, South. 

Lake Odessa 

Lakeview 

Lansing, Plymouth . 
Mackinac Island 



$1 


17 


I 


00 


12 
18 


76 
00 


5 


10 


74 


55 


12 


50 


4 


00 


25 
7 


00 

78 


2 


00 


3 


50 


100 


00 


100 


00 


5 

17 


00 
86 


8 


47 


2 


00 


30 
6 


00 
00 


90 25 


11 


00 


10 


00 


2 

6 


5° 
00 


49 


00 


5 


00 



Manistee, S. S $22 66 

Metamora 15 00 

Middleville 22 50 

Jr. Y. P. S. C. E 50 

Muskegon, Jackson St. S. S 75 

Highland Park 4 73 

S. S 2 00 

Newaygo Y. P. S. C. E 1 02 

Oakwood 8 30 

Oxford 25 90 

Pinckney 20 00 

Pontiac 33 00 

Rockford, Y. P. S. C. E 25 

St. Joseph Y. P. S. C. E 500 

Shelby 5 36 

Superior 5 00 

Thompsonville 2 00 

Union City 30 93 

Vicksburg 1 00 

Wayland 6 00 

Ypsilanti, Y. P. S. C. E 20 00 

Anonymous 362 00 

Sale of Maple Rapids Ch 165 00 

W. H. M. U. of Mich., by Mrs. 

E. F. Grabill, Treas 48281 

Total $1,852 15 



270 



The Home Missionary- 



April, 1900 



Receipts of the Woman's Home Missionary Union of Michigan for February, /goo. 
Mrs. E. F. Grabill, Treasurer 



Allegan, \V. M. S $11 25 

Bay View, Mrs. Joel Martin 1 00 

Benton Harbor, L. M. U 500 

Ceresco, \V. M. S 400 

Detroit, Mt. Hope L. A. S 5 00 

Galesburg, W. M. S 20 00 

Grand Ledge, W. H. M. U 2 50 

Grand Rapids, Park, M. S 2200 

Greenville, W. H. M. S., pledges, 

$6.75; thank-offering, $7.20 13 95 

Hancock, W. M. S 10 00 

Hudson, Mrs. C. B. Stowell 100 00 

Kendall, W. M. S 460 

Lacota, VV. M. S 1 18 

Muskegon, First, W. M. S 25 00 

Owosso, W. M. S., $9.70; Archie 

and Helen Roberts, 30 cents.... 1000 

Portland, W. M. S 251 

Rochester, W. M. S 1 25 

Saginaw, W. S 6500 



Tipton, W. M. S... 
Webster, W. H. M. 



YOUNG PEOPLE'S FUND. 

Cooper, Y. W. M. S 

Detroit, First, Boynton C. E. S., 

Juniors 

Woodward Ave. S. S. (branch of 

First Ch.) '. 

Muskegon, First Y. P. S. C. E 

Owosso, Y. P. S. C. E 

Rochester, Y. P. S. C. E 

Wyandotte, Jun. C. E. S 



$7 So 
19 50 



33i 24 



7 00 
5 00 



2 


50 


20 


00 


10 


00 


4 


00 


2 


00 


So So 



si 74 



THE MISSIONARY SOCIETY OF CONNECTICUT 



Contributions for the month of December, i8gg. 

Hartford 



Ward W. Jacobs, Treasurer, 



Andover, by Rev. Oliver Brown 

Barkhamsted, by Wallace Case.... 

Bethlehem, by Samuel P. Hayes, 
for C. H. M. S 

Bridgeport, King's Highway, by 
F. W. Storrs 

Bridgewater, by Elmer Frost 

Burlington, by Samuel Russell 

Canaan, First, by Rev. C. W. 
Hanna, for C. H. M. S 

Colchester, First, by W. L. Hart.. 

East Haddam, First, by Eugene 
W. Chaffee 

East Hampton, First, by S. Mills 
Bevin 

East Windsor, First, by E. G. Mor- 
ton 

Falls Village, by Rev. C. W. 
Hanna, for C. H. M. S 

Glastonbury, First, by M. S. 
Tracy 

Guilford, First, by E. W. Leete.. 

Hartford, Park, by Willis E. 
Smith 

Harwinton, by Albert G. Wilson.. 

Kensington, by S. M. Cowles, for 
C. H. M, S 

Killingworth, by N. H. Evarts 

Madison, First, Ladies' Mission- 
ary Soc, by Charlotte A. Gal- 
lup 

Meriden, First, by H. M. Billard. . 

Middletown, Swedish, by Edwin 
Anderson 

New Britain, South, by P. M. 
Bronson 

New Haven, Dwight Place, by 
Fred. C. Lum, for C. H. M. S.. 

North Haven, by Whitney Elliott. . 

North Madison, Children's Mission 
Circle, for C. H. M. S., for Cu- 



$20 
6 


25 

4C 


49 


22 


7 
7 
10 


00 
or. 
00 


S 
48 


00 
10 


4 


13 


32 


Si 


36 


06 


S 


00 


287 

20 


95 
00 


S3 

7 


53 

55 


IS 
13 


So 

75 


19 
69 


00 
35 


3 


5° 


272 


Si 


84 
60 


74 

00 



ban work in Florida and Cuba, 

by Mrs. C. A. Thompson $200 

North Windham, by O. E. Col- 
burn 4 36 

North Woodstock, by Esther E. 
Bishop 13 81 

Norwich, Park, by H. L. Butts.. 45 14 

Orange, by S. D. Woodruff 1326 

Plymouth, First, by Arthur Beards- 
ley 1250 

Poquonock, by L. R. Lord 550 

South Glastonbury, Ch. and S. S., 
by H. D. Hale 64 16 

Stonington, First, by Rev. J. O. 
Barrows 19 00 

Talcottville, by M. H. Talcott.... 17500 
By M. H. Talcott, for C. H. 
M. S 160 25 

Thomaston, First, by H. A. Wel- 
ton, for C. H. M. S 16 38 

Thompson, by George S. Crosby, 

for C, H. M. S 15 97 

By George S. Crosby 15 97 

Union, by Roscius Back 500 

Waterbury, Third, by Miller C. 
Haynor 18 20 

West Hartford, First, by E. S. 
Elmer 20 03 

West Haven, First, by S. J. Bry- 
ant 39 35 

Whitneyville, by James M. Payne. 15 00 

Woodstock, First, by Henry T. 
Child 1000 

W. XI. H. M. U. of Conn., by Mrs. 
Geo. Follett, Lebanon, First, by 
Miss Julia R. Maxwell 1329 

C. H. M. S 354 06 

M. S. C 1.468 52 



$1,822 58 



April, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



271 



Contributions for the month of January ', igoo 



Barkhamsted, by Wallace Case $500 

Bethel, by A. H. Knox 700 

Bridgeport, West End, by Rev. Cy- 
rus F. Stimson 4400 

Broad Brook, by S. B. Adams 1* 12 

For C H. M. S n 94 

Cornwall, First, by John E. Cal- 
houn, for C. H. M. S 10500 

Danbury, Second, by Rev. Frederic 

M. Hollister 600 

Sunday-school 5 00 

Danielson, by Charles Phillips... *i ri 

For C. H. M. S 26 11 

Griswold, by Rev. F. E. Allen 00 

For C. H. M. S 20 00 

Y. P. S. C. E., for C. H. M. S.. S 00 
Hartford, First, Mrs. E. A. Smith, 

personal 100 00 

Herbert Knox Smith, do 100 00 

Ernest \V. Smith, do 100 00 

Asylum Hill, by Charles E. 

Thompson 303 09 

Rev. W. H. Moore, personal... 2000 
Kent, Young Ladies' Mission 

Circle, by May Chamberlin 500 

Lyme, First, by Rev. E. F. Burr.. 50 00 

Mansfield, First, by H. S. Brown. 31 15 

Monroe, by A. Wheeler 700 

New Britain, South, S. S., by Ed- 
ward H. Case 30 00 

New Fairfield, Missionary Soc, by 

Mrs. Luella Knapp 1000 



New Haven, Danish, by Rev. Lud- 
wig Johnson 

New London, First, by P. LeRoy 
Harwood 

New Preston Hill, by W. L. Bir- 
kins 

North Guilford, by Benj. Rossiter. 

Norwalk, First, by E. L. Boyer. . . . 

Norwich, First, by Lewis A. Hyde. 

Old Lyme, by William F. Court.. 

Redding, by J. B. Sanford 

Shelton, S. S., by J. Tomlinson.. 

South Britain, by Miss Maria C. 
Bradley 

Union, by Roscius Back 

Waterbury, Second, Mrs. W. H. 
Camp, personal 

West Haven, First, by S. J. Bry- 
ant, Add'l 

Wethersfield, by S. F. Willard... 

Wolcott, by H. L. Andrews 

Woodbury, First, by J. H. Linsley. 



$5 00 

28 19 

10 00 
12 00 
50 00 
82 13 

17 35 
17 00 
25 00 

4 00 

i 56 

5 00 



42 75 
22 00 
10 00 



Missionary Society of Conn 

Congregational Home Missionary 
Society 



$1,368 83 

1,200 78 
168 05 

$1,368 83 



Contributions for the month of February, igoo 



Hartford, First, by C. T. Welles.. $161 07 
" Hawes Fund," for C. H. M. S. " 35 25 

Middletown, First, by E. P. Augur. 22 64 

Naugatuck, by Miss Ellen Spencer. 100 00 
For C. H. M. S., to constitute 
Deacon Sheldon F. Payne, Dea- 
con James Jones, and Deacon 

Rufus W. Lewis life members.. 150 00 
For C. H. M. S., special for 

work in Puerto Rico.... 15 00 

New Haven, Howard Ave., by 

C. C. Chalker 705 

Niantic, by Rev. F. A. Fuller. ... 8 87 

Norfolk, by Stephen A. Selden... 5000 

Southington, by R. G. Andrews.. 35 56 

Southport, John H. Perry, personal 20 00 
Stamford, Long Ridge, by Stephen 

S. Crane 3 00 



Thomaston, First, by H. A. Wel- 

ton, for C. H. M. S, $11 84 

Torrington, Torringford, by W. L. ' 

Durand 29 26 

Third, by F. M. Wheeler 13 82 

For C. H. M. S 35 94 

Windham, by William Swift 47 38 



Missionary Society of Conn 

Congregational Home Missionary 
Society 



$746 68 

$498 65 
248 03 

$746 68 



2J: 



The Home Missionary 



April, 1900 



WOMAN'S STATE HOME MISSIONARY 
ORGANIZATIONS 

OFFICERS 



1. NEW HAMPSHIRE 



5. MAINE 



FEMALE CENT INSTITUTION 

Organized August, 1804 

and 

HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized June, 1890 

President, Mrs. W. D. Knapp, Somersworth. 
Secretary, Mrs. M. W. Nims, 3 Liberty St., 

Concord. 
Treasurer, Miss Annie A. McFarland, 196 No. 

Main St., Concord. 



WOMAN'S MISSIONARY AUXILIARY 
Organized June, 1880 

President, Mrs. Katherine B. Lewis, So. Ber- 
wick. 

Secretary, Mrs. Gertrude H. Denio, 168 Ham- 
mond St., Bangor. 

Treasurer, Mrs. Rose M. Crosby, 64 Grove 
St., Bangor. 



6. MICHIGAN 



2. MINNESOTA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 
Organized September, 1872 

President, Miss Catherine W. Nichols, 230 E. 

9th St., St. Paul. 
Secretary, Mrs. E. R. Shepard, 2931 Portland 

Ave., Minneapolis. 
Treasurer, Mrs. M. W. Skinner, Northfield. 



WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 
Organized May, 1881 

President, Mrs. I. P. Powell, 76 Jefferson 

Ave., Grand Rapids. 
Secretary, Mrs. E. N. Thome, 212 So. Union 

St., Grand Rapids. 
Treasurer, Mrs. E. F. Grabill, Greenville. 



3. ALABAMA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized March, 1877 

Reorganized April, 1889 

President, Mrs. G. W. Andrews, Talladega. 
Secretary, Mrs. J. S. Jackson, Montgomery. 
Treasurer, Mrs. E. C. Silsby, Talladega. 



7. KANSAS 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 
Organized October, 1881 

President, Mrs. R. B. Guild, 1336 Dillon St., 

Topeka. 
Secretary, Mrs. M. H. Jaquith, 1157 Filmore 

St., Topeka. 
Treasurer, Miss May Wilkinson, Ottawa. 



4. MASSACHUSETTS AND RHODE 
ISLAND 



8. OHIO 



WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY ASSO- 
CIATION 

Organized February, 1880 

President, Mrs. C. L. Goodell, 607 Congrega- 
tional House, Boston. 

Secretary, Mrs. Louise A. Kellogg, 607 Con- 
gregational House, Boston. 

Treasurer, Miss Lizzie D. White, 607 Congre- 
gational House, Boston. 



WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 
Organized May, 1882 

President, Mrs. C. W. Carroll, 48 Brookfield 
St., Cleveland. 

Secretary, Mrs. A. H. Williams, 227 Princeton 
St., Cleveland. 

Treasurer, Mrs. George B. Brown, 21 16 War- 
ren St., Toledo. 



April, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



2 73 



9. NEW YORK 



15. CONNECTICUT 



WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 
Organized October, 1883 

President, Mrs. William Kincaid, 483 Greene 

Ave., Brooklyn. 
Secretary, Mrs. William Spalding, 513 Orange 

St., Syracuse. 
Treasurer, Mrs. J. J. Pearsall, 153 Decatur 

St., Brooklyn. 



WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 
Organized January, 1883 

President, Miss Ellen R. Camp, 9 Camp St., 

New Britain 
Secretary, Mrs. C. T. Millard, 36 Lewis St., 

Hartford. 
Treasurer, Miss Anne W. Moore, 15 Columbia 

St., Hartford. 



10. WISCONSIN 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1883 

President, Mrs. E. G. Updike, Madison. 
Secretary, Mrs. A. O. Wright, Madison. 
Treasurer, Mrs. L. E. Smith, Madison. 

11. NORTH DAKOTA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized November, 1883 

President, Mrs. E. H. Stickney, Fargo. 
Secretary, Mrs. Silas Daggett, Harwood. 
Treasurer, Mrs. J. M. Fisher, Fargo. 

12. OREGON 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized July, 1884 

President, Mrs. F. Eggert, The Hill, Port- 
land. 
Cor. Sec, Mrs. D. D. Clarke, 447 E. 12th St., 

No. Portland. 
Treasurer, Mrs. C F. Clapp, Forest Grove. 

13. WASHINGTON 

Including Northern Idaho 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

. Organized July, 1884 

Reorganized June, 1889 

President, Mrs. A. Judson Bailey, 805 First 

Ave., West, Seattle. 
Secretary, Mrs. W. C. Wheeler, 424 South K 

St., Tacoma. 
Treasurer, Mrs. E. B. Burwell, 323 Seventh 

Ave., Seattle. 



14. SOUTH DAKOTA 
WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized September, 1884 
President, 



Secretary, Mrs. K. M. Jenney, Huron. 
Treasurer, Mrs. F- M - WU C0X > Huron, 



16. MISSOURI 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1885 

President, Mrs. C. H. Patton, 3707 Westmin- 
ster Place, St. Louis. 

Secretary, Mrs. C. W. S. Cobb, 4415 W. Mor- 
gan St., St. Louis. 

Treasurer, Mrs. A. J. Steele, 2825 Washington 
Ave., St. Louis. 

17. ILLINOIS 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 
Organized May, 1885 

President, Mrs. Sydney Strong, 234 N. Elm- 
wood Ave., Oak Park. 

Secretary, Mrs. A. O. Whitcomb, 463 Irving 
Ave., Chicago. 

Treasurer, Mrs. Mary S. Booth, 30 S. Wood 
St., Chicago. 

18. IOWA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized June, 1886 

President, 

Secretary, Mrs. H. H. Robbins, Grinnell. 
Treasurer, Miss Belle L. Bentley, W. Grand 
Ave., Des Moines. 

19. CALIFORNIA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY SO- 
CIETY 

Organized June, 1887 

President, Mrs. E. S. Williams, Saratoga. 
Secretary, Mrs. F. B. Perkins, 600 17th St., 

Oakland. 
Treasurer, Mrs. J. M. Haven, 1329 Harrison 

St., Oakland. 

20. NEBRASKA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 
Organized November, 1887 

President, Mrs. D. B. Perry, Crete. 

Secretary, Mrs. H. Bross, 2904 Q St., Lin- 
coln. 

Treasurer, Mrs. Charlotte C. Hall, 1318 C St., 
Lincoln. 



274 



The Home Missionary 



April, 1900 



ax. FLORIDA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARYUNION 

Organized February, 1888 

President, Mrs. S. F. Gale, Jacksonville. 
Secretary, Mrs. W. H. Edmondson, Daytona. 
Treasurer, Mrs. W. D. Brown, Interlachen. 



22. INDIANA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARYUNION 

Organized May, 1888 

President, Mrs. W. A. Bell, 121 1 Broadway, 

Indianapolis. 
Secretary, Mrs. J. E. Hall, Alexandria. 
Treasurer, Mrs. Anna D. Davis, 1608 Belle- 

fontaine St., Indianapolis. 



27. GEORGIA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized November, 1888 

New Organization October, 1898 

President, Miss M. L. Graham, Savannah. 
Secretary, Miss Jennie Curtis. Mcintosh. 
1 reasurer, Miss Mattie Turner, Athens. 

28. MISSISSIPPI 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized April, 1889 

President, Mrs. C. L. Harris, 1421 31st Ave 

Meridian. 

Secretary, 

Treasurer, Mrs. L. H. Turner, 31 12 12th St. 

Meridian. 



23. SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARYUNION 

Organized May, 1888 

President, Mrs. Warren F. Day, 949 So. Hill 

St., Los Angeles. 
Secretary, Mrs. Kate G. Robertson, Mentone. 
Treasurer, Mrs. Katharine Barnes, Pasadena. 



24. VERMONT 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARYUNION 

Organized June, 1888 

President, Mrs. Rebecca P. Fairbanks, St. 

Johnsbury. 
Secretary, Mrs. C. L. Smith, 159 Pine St., 

Burlington. 
Treasurer, Mrs. Robert MacKinnon, St. 

Johnsbury. 



25. COLORADO 
WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARYUNION 

Organized October, 1888 

Htn.Pres., Mrs. J. W. Pickett, Whitewater. 
President, Mrs. E. R. Drake, 18 Mack Block, 

Denver. 
Secretary, Mrs. Addison Blanchard, 3023 

Downing Ave., Denver. 
Treasurer, Mrs. F. N. Thomas, Eaton. 

26. WYOMING 
WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1888 

Reorganized December, 1892 

President, Mrs. J. A. Raner, Cheyenne. 
Secretary, Mrs. W. L. Whipple, Cheyenne. 
Treasurer, Mrs, A, E. Kevan, Rock Springs. 



29. LOUISIANA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized April, 1889 

President, Mrs. L. St. J. Hitchcock, 2436 
Canal St., New Orleans. 

Secretary, Mrs. Matilda Cabrere, 2419 Conti 
St., New Orleans. 

Treasurer, Miss Mary L. Rogers, 2436 Canal 
St., New Orleans. 

30. ARKANSAS, KENTUCKY AND TEN- 
NESSEE 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION OF 
THE CENTRAL SOUTH ASSO- 
CIATION 
Organized April, 1889 

President, Mrs. Ella S. Moore, . Box 8, Fisk 
_■ University, Nashville, Tenn. 

Secretary, Miss Mary L. Corpier, Florence, 

Ala. 
Treasurer, Mrs. Preston Burrus, 815 Cedar 

St., Nashville. 

31. NORTH CAROLINA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1889 

President, Mrs. O. Faduma, Troy. 
Secretary 1 Miss A K Farrington, Talla- 

and y d Ala _ 

1 reasurer, ) 

32. TEXAS 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARYUNION 

Organized March, 1890 

President, Mrs. Eunice Heflin, Sherman. 
Secretary, Mrs. Donald Hinckley, Dallas. 
Treasurer, Mrs. A. Geen, Dallas. 



April, 1900 



The Home Missionary 



275 



33. MONTANA 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1890 

President, Mrs. V. F. Clark, Livingston. 

Secretary ) Mrs- W- s> BelI 6lI Spruce St., 

_, and r Helena. 
1 reasurer, ) 



38. INDIAN TERRITORY 
WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 
Organized April, 1892 



President, 

Secretary, Miss Louise Graper, Vinita. 
Treasurer, Mrs. Raymond, Vinita. 



34. PENNSYLVANIA 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized June, 1890 

President, Mrs. C. F. Yennie, Wilcox. 
Secretary, Mrs. C. A. Waid, Ridgway. 
Treasurer, Mrs. D. Howells, Kane. 

35. OKLAHOMA 
WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1890 

President, Mrs. J. H. Parker, Kingfisher. 
Secretary, Mrs. Joel Harper, Oklahoma City. 
Treasurer, Mrs. A. B. Hammer, Oklahoma 
City. 

36. NEW JERSEY 

Including District of Columbia, Maryland, 
and Virginia 

WOMAN'S HOME MISSIONARY UNION 
OF THE NEW JERSEY ASSOCIATION 

Organized March, 1891 

President, Mrs. Isaac Clark, cor. 4th and Col- 
lege Sts., N. W., Washington, 
D. C. 

Secretary, Miss Julia M. Pond, 607 T St., N. 
E., Washington, D. C. 

Treasurer, Mrs. G. A. L. Merrifield, Falls 
Church, Va. 

37. UTAH 

WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1891 

Reorganized December, 1892 

President, Mrs. Hemphill, 67 J St., Salt Lake 

City. 
Secretary, Mrs. L. E. Hall, 78 East First 

North St., Salt Lake City. 
Treasurer, Miss Anna Baker, 654 East Third 

South St., Salt Lake City. 



39. NEVADA 

< WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized October, 1892 

President, Mrs. L. J. Flint, Reno. 
Secretary, Miss Margaret N. Magill, Reno. 
Treasurer, Miss Mary Clow, Reno. 



40. NEW MEXICO 
WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION. 

Organized November, 1892 

President, Mrs. E. H. Ashmun, Albuquerque. 
Secretary, Mrs. F. A. Burlingame, Albu- 
querque. 
Treasurer, Mrs. M. McClaskey, Albuquerque. 



41. BLACK HILLS, SO. DAKOTA 
BLACK HILLS WOMAN'S MISSION- 
ARY UNION 

Organized October, 1893 

President, Mrs. J. B. Gossage, Rapid City. 
Secretary, Mrs. C. W. Barron, Rapid City. 
Treasurer, Mrs. E. L. Billings, Lead. 



42. IDAHO 
WOMAN'S MISSIONARY UNION 

Organized May, 1895 

President, Mrs. R. B. Wright, Boise. 
Secretary, Mrs. C. E. Mason, Mountainhome. 
Treasurer, Mrs. L. H. Johnston, Challis. 



276 The Home Missionary April, 1900 



SECRETARIES OF YOUNG PEOPLE'S WORK 



Minnesota - 



Young Ladies' Work, Mrs. B. W. Smith, 600 West 
Thirty-second St., Minneapolis. 

Christian Endeavor Work, Miss Bertha Hanneman, 
1816 Portland Ave., Minneapolis. 

Mass. and R. I Miss Bertha M. Shepard, 607 Congregational House, 

Boston. 

Michigan Mrs. W. J. Gregory, 459 Third St., Manistee. 

Kansas Miss Harriet Broad, Topeka. 

Ohio Miss M. C. Smith, 840 Doan St., Cleveland. 

New York Mrs. H. A. Flint, 604 Willis Ave., Syracuse. 

North Dakota Mrs. E. S. Shaw, Cooperstown. 

Oregon Mrs. W. D. Palmer, 443 West Park St., Portland. 

Washington Mrs. W. C. Davie, 423 North N St., Tacoma. 

South Dakota Mrs. Grace Burleigh, Mitchell. 

Illinois Mrs. J. T. Blanchard, 218 Walnut St., Aurora. 

Missouri Miss Katherine Jones, 4337 Washington Ave., St. Louis. 

Iowa Miss Fannie Spencer, Alden. 

Nebraska Mrs. J. N. Hyder, 1520 U St., Lincoln. 

Southern California. . Miss Phebe Mayhew, 4 Barnard Park, Los Angeles. 

Vermont Mrs. G. W. Patterson, East St. Johnsbury. 

Colorado Mrs. A. D. Blakeslee, 145 South Lincoln St., Denver. 

Montana Mrs. H. C. Arnold, 621 Spruce St., Helena. 

SECRETARIES OF CHILDREN'S WORK 

Minnesota Mrs. H. S. Baker, 2268 Blake Ave., St. Anthony Park. 

Michigan Mrs. C. R. Wilson, 65 Frederick Ave., Detroit. 

Kansas Miss Hattie Booth, Newton. 

Ohio Mrs. Effie Morgan, 380 St. Clair St., Cleveland. 

North Dakota Mrs. O. J. Wakefield, Wahpeton. 

South Dakota Mrs. I. Crain, Waubay. 

Illinois Miss Hattie Kline, 713 E. Sixty-third St., Chicago. 

Nebraska Mrs. H. D. Neely, 4371 Hamilton St., Omaha. 

Southern California. . Miss Emily M. Peck, 920 W. Eighth St., Los Angeles. 
Montana Mrs. H. B. Segur, Billings. 



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